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Joy Leinenbach ARE 6195 November 18, 2008. Febreze-Range/16772/2 Objectives  Students will learn how to look.

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Presentation on theme: "Joy Leinenbach ARE 6195 November 18, 2008. Febreze-Range/16772/2 Objectives  Students will learn how to look."— Presentation transcript:

1 Joy Leinenbach ARE 6195 November 18, 2008

2 http://www.visit4info.com/advert/Febreze- Febreze-Range/16772/2 Objectives  Students will learn how to look critically at advertisements to determine the hidden messages that are sometimes conveyed to the viewer.  Students will determine how stereotypes and moral values are used in advertising.  Students will develop critical skills that will allow them to be more informed consumers. Procedures  Show students a thirty second commercial advertisement for Febreze  After showing the commercial lead students in a classroom discussion about the commercial they just watched.  Discuss aspects of television commercials to focus awareness on the messages and powers of commercials.  Ask students: What product is the commercial advertising? Does the commercial clearly show the function and ability of the product? Are the characters presented in a stereotypical way? If so, how or what stereotypes? Is there a message or belief being communicated in addition to the selling of the product ?

3 Assessment o Students will submit a written page naming a commercial of their choice. o Students will name: o the product o what time and channel it was viewed on o a description of the characters, setting, and plot of the commercial. o They must note aspects of the commercial that show or reinforce stereotypes and describe what they are. o Also, describe what kind of underlying message can be gotten from the commercial besides what product is for sale. Statement of Origin The purpose of this lesson stems from the assigned readings of excerpts from Rose K. Goldsen’s book The Show and Tell Machine. That reading emphasized how television plays such a large role in the life of us all and also points out the power It has to persuade us to do, think, and buy things. Since commercials are such a large part of our television viewing time, students need to learn how to look critically at commercials and determine what messages are being presented either blatantly or subversively.

4 Objectives Students will learn how to apply the Feldman method of art criticism when judging art and support their judgments using the visual facts. Students will become aware of how artists’ work reflects social issues like race and attitudes of the artist. Procedures Discuss the background information about the sport of basketball and basketball stars like Michael Jordan. Next, show the students Basketball and Chain by Hank Willis Thomas. Ask students for their first impressions. Guide the students through the steps of DESRIBE, ANALYZE, INTERPRET, & JUDGE by looking as a class at the image and ask questions to gather the information needed to reach a judgment. Did this process change alter their previous impression of the work? Students will then be asked to critique Hang Time (Circa 1923) individually using the steps practiced together.

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7 Assessment Students will write a critique. Students will include sections to address each of the steps of the Feldman method. Critiques will be assessed using a rubric that outlines the key information needed for each step. Statement of Origin In common with the article by Paul Duncam that discusses Aesthetics and Ideology in tension with each other, I also felt like the work of this artist embodies that idea as well. While the images are pleasing to look at you experience a shock while you are Looking because you know that the subject of the works address social injustices and hate.

8 Objectives Students will become aware of how the skill of art criticism develops through a series of stages. Students will learn what the stages are and how they are defined. Procedures Students will be shown an image of Mary Proctor’s work. They will be asked to make statements about the artwork. I would then show them an example of how people at the 5 different stages might react to the work they viewed. Students will identify what stage their comment would be categorized under After explaining that learning in art would include striving to reach the higher stages, I would then ask them to look at the 2 nd piece by Mary Proctor and attempt to make observations that would be made by those in the next stage up from where they were originally.

9 Assessment Using their written responses to the artists work, students will attempt to identify the stage that they are in based on the descriptions of the 5 stages by Parsons. Assessment will be based on the completion of the responses and the correct identification of their stage based on those responses. Statement of Origin I chose to use this project as an opportunity to show students what stage of criticism they are functioning at because of the Parson’s reading assignment. I think that if the students can be made more aware of the different levels they will realize what to strive for. It would work something like a rubric in letting the students know what high and low level looks like.

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12 Objectives Students will become aware of how cultural symbols are used in artwork Students will understand the meanings that can be attached to an artwork by those symbols and how it affects their interpretation. Procedures Students will look at the image The Perfect Marriage and list the cultural symbols that are present in the work and what they stand for. Students will then view The Girl I Left Behind and discuss how the meaning is changed by adding different symbols. Assessment Students would then create their own plan in their sketchpad for a clothing item and embellishments that symbolize their “identity”. Students would then present their drawing and explain to the group their selections and the meaning that they intended. Statement of Origin I was interested in how certain images were used as symbols to represent ideas of a subgroup within our society

13 The Perfect Marriage March 2000 78" x 48" x 36" Mixed media

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15 Objectives Students will understand that there are a variety of schools of criticism from which the viewer may work. Students will understand the basis and function of Feminist criticism. Procedures Give examples of various schools of criticism. Briefly explain the focus of feminist criticism in particular. Ask the students to choose one of the two works by Karen Searle and complete the written assignment (see assessment) Assessment Pick three aspects of the work that relate to woman’s roles in society or and tell how they might give the viewer an insight into the meaning of the work. Statement of Origin I wanted to create a lesson to show students how criticism can be done from a variety of different points of view, and in particular how the feminist point of view can give insight.

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18 Objectives Students will learn that the description of an artwork includes titles and materials used. These aspects can have a great influence on the meaning of the work. Procedures Students will view Strike Anywhere and discuss together how the title and materials contribute to the meaning of the work. Students will then view the work 22 Caliber Flag and write their own description of the work. Students can share parts of their description with the group to see if anyone came up with points that others missed. Assessment Students will turn in completed written descriptions of the work 22 Caliber Flag

19 Strike Anywhere, 2000 23 x 24 x 8 in. Leather case, matches

20 22 Caliber Flag, 2001 1 x 28.5 x 18 in. Lead and copper-tipped bullets

21 Feldman, E. B. (1994). Practical art criticism. Englewood Cliffs, N J: Prentice Hall. Goldsen, R. K. (1978). The show and tell machine. New York: Delta Publishing. Holmes, Kathleen (Artist). (2000). The Perfect Marriage [Image of painting]. Lake Worth, Florida; Collection of the artist. Retrieved October 22, 2008, from http://www.kathleenholmes.com/galleries.http://www.kathleenholmes.com/galleries Holmes, Kathleen (Artist). (2008). The Girl I Left Behind [Image of painting]. Lake Worth, Florida; Collection of the artist. Retrieved October 22, 2008, from http://www.kathleenholmes.com/galleries.http://www.kathleenholmes.com/galleries Parsons, M. (1992). How we understand art. New York: Cambridge University Press. Proctor, Mary (Artist). (Unknown). We walk by faith not by sight [Image of painting]. Proctor, Mary (Artist). (Unknown). Grandma's Blue Willow [Image of painting].

22 Searle, Karen (Artist). (unknown). Woman Within II [Image of sculpture]. Minneapolis, Minnesota; Collection of the artist. Retrieved October 15, 2008, from http://karensearle.com. http://karensearle.com Searle, Karen (Artist). (unknown). Essence: Image and Reality [Image of sculpture]. Minneapolis, Minnesota; Collection of the artist. Retrieved October 15, 2008, from http://karensearle.com. http://karensearle.com Salvest, John (Artist). (2000). Strike Anywhere [Image of painting]. New York, New York; Morgan Lehman Gallery of Contemporary Art. Retrieved October 24, 2008, from http://www.morganlehmangallery.comhttp://www.morganlehmangallery.com. Salvest, John (Artist). (2001). 22 Caliber Flag [Image of painting]. New York, New York; Morgan Lehman Gallery of Contemporary Art. Retrieved October 24, 2008, from http://www.morganlehmangallery.com.http://www.morganlehmangallery.com Taunton, M. (1983). Questioning strategies to encourage children to talk about art. Willis-Thomas, Hank (Artist). (2003). Basketball and Chain [Image of painting]. Atlanta, Georgia; Wertz Contemporary Art Gallery. Retrieved October 20, 2008, from http://wertzcontemporary.com/artistshttp://wertzcontemporary.com/artists. Willis-Thomas, Hank (Artist). (2008). Hang Time (Circa 1923) [Image of painting]. Atlanta, Georgia; Wertz Contemporary Art Gallery. Retrieved October 20, 2008, from http://wertzcontemporary.com/artistshttp://wertzcontemporary.com/artists.


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