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Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Understanding & Preventing Work-Related Burnout Kathleen Johnston, MA www.kathleenjohnston.com.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Understanding & Preventing Work-Related Burnout Kathleen Johnston, MA www.kathleenjohnston.com."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Understanding & Preventing Work-Related Burnout Kathleen Johnston, MA P. (780)

2 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Seminar Objectives 1.To understand burnout. 2.To understand stress, stress overload and the relationship to burnout. 3. To recognize the symptoms and stages of burnout. 4. To learn prevention and intervention strategies for burnout.

3 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Audience Poll Pair Discussion “Why are you interested in the topic work-related burnout?”

4 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Stress Overload vs Burnout Stress Overload Burnout ● Over-engagement ● Disengagement ● Over-reactive emotions ● Blunted emotions ● Urgency and hyperactivity ● Helplessness/hopelessness ● Loss of energy ● Loss of motivation/ideals/hope ● Primary damage: physical ● Primary damage: emotional ● Premature aging ● Makes life not seem worth living

5 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. What Is Stress?  inborn biological mechanism existing in all living creatures  purpose is to protect the organism to ensure its’ survival and to ensure the survival of its’ species  this stress mechanism, (survival instinct) operates through the concept “fight, flight or freeze” (Source: Stress vs Distress by Hans Selye)

6 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. STRESS is ENERGY

7 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Stress Hormones When the stress response [“known as fight or flight”] is triggered in our brain, our bodies are injected with important hormones:  Adrenaline (upper)  Cortisol (downer)

8 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Physiological Response Decreased: digestion immune system mental creativity emotional stability sex hormones Increased: muscle tension blood pressure breathing rate heart rate mental alertness emotional anxiety blood sugars and fats metabolism

9 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Single Stress Event Stressor Response Intensity Immediate response Quick return to relaxation Passage of Time

10 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Multiple Stress Events Response Intensity Stressors Stress Build Up Weeks/Years 2

11 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Stress Overload Repeated stressors over weeks, months, years with little to no satisfaction in return for the stress energy invested, and with no regular return to a fully relaxed state, leads to stress overload and eventually to health collapse. Eventual Health collapse Response Intensity

12 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Stress Overload Leads to Illness Stages of Stress Overload Fatigue 2. Relationship problems 3. Negative Emotions 4. Aches/Pains 5. Illness (Source: Canadian Institute of Stress)

13 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Chronic Stress-Related Disorders & Diseases  Heart Disease  Hypertension  Lowered Immunity  Gastrointestinal  Reduced sex drive  Substance abuse  Sleep disorders  Depression  Anxiety  Asthma  Reproductive issues  Migraines  Musculoskeletol  Type II Diabetes

14 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Risk Factors For Stress Overload 1. Negative perception/outlook (pessimist) 2.Family pressure 3. Having a “helper” mentality 4. Work problems 5. Negative coping patterns 6.Undeveloped stress management skills 7.Broken inner “compass” 8.Personal tragedy 9.Limited support system ( Source: Canadian Institute of Stress)

15 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Work-Related Stress (Source: Statistics Canada 2010 General Social Survey)  One quarter of working adults describe their daily life as highly stressful  60% of highly stressed workers identify work as their main source of stress  Workers stressed mainly about work are well-educated and have white- collar jobs  Workers stressed about not having enough time have children at home  Most workers stressed about family matters are women  Employers lose productivity to stress through absenteeism, reduced output and increased disability claims  Mental health problems cost employers $20 billion annually and account for 75% of short-term disability claims in Canada

16 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Source of Stress Among Workers  Poor fit between the individual and the job  Little control over work conditions and terms  Insufficient support from supervisors and colleagues  Financial concerns  Not enough time  Family matters  Personal issues, i.e. relationships, health, worry (Source: Statistics Canada, What’s Stressing the Stressed? 2010)

17 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. My Personal Distress Signals Relationships Mental PhysicalEmotional Spiritual Vocation / Work

18 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. My Favorite Coping Techniques What’s your response to feeling OVERWHELMED by stress?  Eating?  Shopping?  Drinking?  Television vegging?  Booking a massage?  Phoning a friend?  Walking in green space?

19 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Definition of Burnout “Burnout is a painful affliction of good people who are trying to give their very best.” “Burnout is the extinction of motivation or incentive, especially where one’s devotion to a cause or relationship fails to produce” ( Source: Herbert Freudenberger from his 1980 book Burnout: The High Cost of High Achievement quoted in Joan Borysenko’s book Fried: Why You Burnout and How to Revive, 2011 )

20 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Definition of Burnout Burnout is a syndrome consisting of: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment (Source: Maslach Burnout Inventory, 1996)

21 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Understanding Burnout (Source: Joan Borysenko, PhD Fried: Why You Burnout & How to Revive )  Burnout is poorly understood  Physicians misdiagnosis it and hand out antidepressants  Underlying traits predispose people to burnout  Burnout is inevitable if stress overload is unmanaged  Burnout includes a component of depression  Burnout affects thinking, behavior, emotional experiences, relationships and work  Recovery involves changing one’s orientation to life and to work

22 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved.  Personality  Personal values system  Expectations (self and others)  Individual’s relationship with work (identity, passion)  Attitude  Habits  Situational context  Stress overload Burnout Risk Factors

23 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Yerkes-Dodson Law Stress Performance Connection

24 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Structural Model of Burnout Diminished:  Coping  Social Support  Autonomy  Decision interest Increased Demands: Work Overload Personal Conflict Burnout Syndrome:  Exhaustion  Depersonalization  Diminished Personal Accomplishment Costs: Diminished Turnover and Physical organizational absenteeism Illness commitment Source: Maslach Burnout Inventory Manual by Christina Maslach, Susan E. Jackson & Michael P. Leiter)

25 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. …..Burnout…..  Patterns  Insightful self-understanding  Ongoing honest self-monitoring

26 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. 12 Stages of Burnout  Stage 1 - Driven by an Ideal [Insight: Be clear about what motivates your work]  Stage 2 – Working like a Maniac [Insight: Be clear about when your best work occurs]

27 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. 12 stages of Burnout  Stage 3 – Putting Your Own Needs last [Insight: Assess your joy-in-life score]  Stage 4 – Miserable and Clueless as to Why [Insight: Take a sabbatical to evaluate your life]

28 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. 12 Stages of Burnout  Stage 5 – The Death of Values [Insight: Recall how you lived in earlier years]  Stage 6 – Frustrated, Aggressive and Cynical [Insight: Identify your energy drains and do something about them]

29 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. 12 Stages of Burnout  Stage 7 – Emotionally Exhausted and Disengaged [Insight: Who are you truthful with?]  Stage 8 – I’ve Morphed into What? [Insight: What, Who and Why?]

30 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. 12 Stages of Burnout  Stage 9 – Get Away From Me! [Insight: How are you compassionate with yourself?]  Stage 10 – Inner Emptiness [Insight: Find something that feels better]

31 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. 12 Stages of Burnout  Stage 11 – Who Cares and Why Bother? [Insight: Do you need professional help?]  Stage 12 – Physical and Mental Collapse [Insight: What means the most to you and how can you bring more of it into your life?]

32 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Prevention Strategies For Stress Overload & Burnout  Manage Perfectionism/Idealism/Drivenness  Work From Your Strengths  Maintain Strong Boundaries  Monitor Your Energy Investment  Use a Stress Management Model  Ask for Help  Practice X-treme Self-Care

33 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Control Your Ideal !!! STOP PERFECTIONISM !!! Consistently look for opportunities to downgrade, delegate, or drop things to control workload

34 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Be Authentic: Work From Strength & Essence  Your strengths are a combination of your natural talents, plus your knowledge, skills, and practiced experience.  Know your values: who you are at your inner core  Know your life purpose and your priorities

35 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Develop Strong Boundaries Weak/Permeable Strong/Healthy Boundaries are the invisible barriers that separate you—physically, emotionally, and spiritually—from the world around you. Boundaries define who you are and keep you secure. What “boundary work” might you need to do? (Source: Boundaries: Where you end and I begin by Anne Katherine, MA, 1991)

36 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Monitor Your Energy Investment Ask yourself:  What / who are the Energy Drainers in my life?  What / who are the Energy Restorers in my life?

37 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Stress Management Model A lter: How might I change something to remove the source of the stress? A void How might I get away from the stress? A ccept How might I live with the stress by:  b uilding up resistance, and  c hanging myself or my perception

38 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Ask For Help I hesitate to ask for help because... And the things I could use help with right now include...

39 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Practice X-treme Self Care How are the caretaking activities I offer to others different from those which I apply to myself?

40 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Work-related Burnout: Preventable & Reversible From This To This

41 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Satisfaction V. Stress Good Days Bad Days Satisfaction Stress Personal Vitality Quotient = Your R eturn on Investment

42 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Personal Action Plan One action I will take immediately to diminish stress overload in my life and reduce the chance of burnout.

43 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. WOMEN’S CAREERS Ordinary Women— Extraordinary Lives: 1. A Woman’s Career Legacy 2. A Woman’s Career Diary WORK Kathleen Johnston’s Monthly Newsletter!

44 Copyright © 2009 Kathleen Johnston. All rights reserved. Kathleen Johnston, MA – Career Strategist P. (780)


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