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Technology-Enhanced Lesson Presentation Natural Dyeing with Natural Fabrics PPT for CCAD, 2011 Instructor – Irina Grebennik Phoenix University, 05/17/2011.

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Presentation on theme: "Technology-Enhanced Lesson Presentation Natural Dyeing with Natural Fabrics PPT for CCAD, 2011 Instructor – Irina Grebennik Phoenix University, 05/17/2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Technology-Enhanced Lesson Presentation Natural Dyeing with Natural Fabrics PPT for CCAD, 2011 Instructor – Irina Grebennik Phoenix University, 05/17/2011

2 WHAT IS THE NATURAL DYIENG? NATURAL DYES IN CONTENT oskMiniP A GLOBAL ART Review Review ARTISAN FABRICS NATURAL AND CHEMICAL COLORS

3 UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS DYEING EQUIPMENT Dyeing the natural way: plastic apron, thermometer, scales, plastic bucket, large stainless steel vessel, airtight containers, sieve, mask, scarf or 1/2yard natural fabric (cotton, silk, organza, ); stainless steel pot, spoons, rubber gloves, stove; mordants, natural dyes-plants, roots, berries; shibori technique- clamps, needle, heavy duty thread/floss, pipe. DID YOU KNOW? Just because your doing 'Natural Dyeing' does not mean you aren't careful, take precautions, or use safety procedures.. Never ever use the same implements in your natural dyeing process that are used for cooking: pots, pans, spoons, cups etc. Always take the time to do it safe and do it right. When in doubt, don't do it.

4 UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS WOOL SILKS COTTON LINEN WOOL FIBERS BLENDS STEPS: PROCEDURES:

5 UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS THE BEST WAY OF PREPARING TO DYE FABRICS Mordanting your fiber material: WEIGH your textile material. All recipes are proportional, just as in cooking. ALUM: Divide the weight of the material to dye BY FOUR. Weight out that much alum mordant. A scant two tablespoons equals one ounce of alum. Add the alum to the pot, and almost fill with warm water. Leave enough room to add the wet textile material. Stir until fully dissolved. OTHER MORDANTS: ½ oz (two teaspoons) per pound fiber for tin, chrome, iron and copper. Wet out the textile in warm water. Add the wet textile. Gently stir so that it is opened out in the solution.

6 THE BEST WAY OF PREPARING TO DYE FIBERS Preparing the Fabric: scouring The first step in dyeing cotton fabric using natural dye is to ensure that it is scoured of all natural waxes as well as added finishes that might interfere with the fixation of the dye. Of course this is also important when using fiber reactive dyes, but it is more so when using natural dye extracts. Starting with "PFD" ("prepared for dyeing") fabrics will help, but scouring even those would be wise. The traditional method of scouring cotton and other cellulose fibers is to boil it well for several hours with a mixture of soda ash and detergent or some other wetting agent. The Earthues people sell a proprietary "scour" that we used in class but I don't like it-- the company is not forthcoming with information on what it is and it doesn't work well with fabrics you later intend to dye with madder. Instead, I would suggest using the wetting agent/detergent Synthrapol. It also is proprietary, but at least the manufacturer, ICI, will give you a MSDS for it, it is widely used, and is known to be effective in stripping unwanted substances from cotton fabric. Do not use standard laundry detergent because they contain "optical brighteners" which are actually dye. The brighteners will compete for the dye attachment sites on the fabric and affect the depth of shade you are going to get. Instead use some brand of detergent that doesn't have brighteners such as Seventh Generation, or us e plain hand dishwashing soap (but be warned that the latter two may foam up a lot). Needless to say, do not use fabric softener or any detergent that has fabric softener in it! Step one: Weigh the fabric, ideally using a scale accurate to a tenth of a gram or better if you hope to have repeatable colors, and write it down in a place where you will be able to find it when you get ready to dye. If you are going to be dyeing many pieces of fabric it would be wise to mark the weight of the fabric on the edge using a laundry marker. Step two: Weigh out an amount of soda ash equal to 2% of the weight of the fabric to be scoured, and "liquid scour" (or "Synthrapol" or other detergent/wetting agent, but you may have to adjust the amount) at 5.5% of the weight of the fabric. I like to use cheap plastic disposable drinking cups as weigh boats. Step three: Starting with cold water, begin heating it in your dedicated dye pot. Always start with cold water because there are often metal salts and other things that will interfere with your dye that come from the hot water heater & pipes. The dye pot ideally should be non-reactive: stainless steel or enameled steel. But many report getting good, if different, results with aluminum pots. Whatever you are using, don't ever use the pot you use to dye in for food. Step four: Once the water starts to get warm, add the soda ash and detergent and stir well. I find the best method is to fill the cups holding the soda ash and detergent with warm water from the pot, stir well to dissolve, and then add back into the pot, again stirring well. Step five: Add the pre-weighed fabric and stir well. Stir frequently throughout the whole process.

7 NATURAL DYEING WITH NATURAL FABRICS INSTRUCTIONS HOW TO WORK WITH FABRIC PAINT DYES? s.html HOW TO USE NATURAL DYES? se_natural_dyes.html HOW TO BLACK WITH NATURAL DYES? ldyes.html

8 NATURAL DYEING WITH NATURAL FABRICS ARTICLES THE ECOLOGY OF COLOR ur.html THERAPEUTIC PROPERTIES OF NATURAL DYED SILKS herapeutic_properties.html ARE MORDANT SAFE? dants_safe.html WHY NATURAL DYES? uraldyes.html

9 NATURAL DYEING RECIPES YELLOW COLOR/YELLOW DYE Yellow is an easily obtainable dye from commonly available local plants. We can get different grades of yellow from different kinds of plants. Marigold Flowers yield a fluorescent yellow. Turmeric Root gives a very strong yellow but it is light sensitive. Pomegranate Rind gives a very warm yellow. The dye extraction is done by boiling the pre soaked raw material (marigold flowers, pomegranate rind) for 1- 2 hours. The solution is then filtered and used to dye pre-mordent fiber.

10 NATURAL DYEING RECIPES cont. Yellow with marigold flowers INGREDIENTS: o 1. Tussar Silk 2. Marigold Flowers 70% of the weight of the fibre 3. Alum 20 % of the weight of the fibre 4. Water 1:20 MORDANTING Soak the tussar silk in water for 24 hours. Grind the alum to a fine texture and dissolve it in water separately Take out the silk and squeeze the water out. Heat the alum solution and enter the silk to be dyed at 60 deg Celsius. Roll the silk every five minutes for one hour. The temperature should be raised from 60°C – 90°C, gradually, and then maintained for one hour. Take the silk out of the mordant solution and keep it aside. DYEING PROCESS Soak the marigold flowers in water for 3 days. Boil the flowers in a steel utensil for 2 hours to extract the color in the water. Filter the solution with a fine cloth. Heat water in a steel utensil and add the dye solution to it. Take the mordanted silk (Do not squeeze it!) and dip it in the above solution. Roll for one hour. The temperature should be raised from 60°C to 90°C, gradually and maintained during rolling. Take the silk out. Let it drip to cool and then squeeze it to dry. Wash the dyed silk in water to remove excess dye and let it dry in shade.

11 NATURAL DYEING RECIPES Marigolds The garden variety kind, fresh or dried will give you from pale yellow to rich orange - depending on the mordant. Use between one quart to 1/2 bushel of flower heads. The more you use, the deeper the color. Cook about 15 minutes; strain and add your fabric. Simmer until the color you want is achieved. Red Oak Use the bark and roots to discover a good shade of 'chocolate' brown. Soak and boil as with other bark, before adding your fabric. Ragweed Besides causing us to sneeze, we can secure a good green from all the mordants by adding some copperas. It almost makes the sneezing worth-while! St. John's Wort Used after its been dried, produced a warm orange shade. As popular as it's become, you might have a difficult time finding the plant itself though.

12 INDIGO - NATURAL DYE THE OLDEST DYE KNOWN TO MAN DYEING WITH INDIGO at_ferm_vat.html THE HISTORY OF INDIGO digo.html

13 NATURAL DYEING WITH NATURAL FABRICS DID YOU KNOW? If you use a different mordant on the same plant, you'll get a different color result. If you harvest the plant from a different location, you see a different color reaction. Everything effects the color when using natural dyeing techniques.

14 MORDANT FOR NATURAL DYEING “MORDRE”- FROM FRENCH “TO BITE” A METHOD TO PRE-TREAT NATURAL FABRICS BEFORE OR AFTER DYEING WELL KNOWN MORDANTS: ALUM CHROME TIN CREAM OF TARTAR IRON

15 MORDANT USE IN NATURAL DYEING Basic Mordanting Points to Learn To much mordant can cause: Alum - harsh and sticky; Chrome - color streaky; Tin - harsh and brittle feeling All should be pre-dissolved, and added separately to water bath. Fabric must be removed before adding additional mordants. Don't Over Crowd the Bath! Avoid sudden changes in the bath; steadily increase the temperature. Add additional water as the boiling causes evaporation. Dispose of any remaining solution safely; Do not use it to water your garden or in your septic tank. These are still chemicals and care must be taken. A good idea would be to contact your local city health or sanitation department to see what they recommend for disposal.

16 VOCABULARY OF NATURAL DYEING VOCABULARY Auxiliary product – a chemical or formulated chemical product that used in dyeing, printing, finishing – or if a given effect is desired – and enables these processes to be more effectively. Wetting-out – is the full penetration of a solution into a fiber in order that dyeing or printing will take place evenly. Ooze – extraction of dye solution of natural dye stuff. Resist – a substance that prevents the uptake or fixation of dye on a fabric in the areas where the resist been applied. Resist can be mechanical or chemical barriers. Scouring/washing – the removal of impurities such as natural waxes, fats and dirt from a fabric by means of washing with a detergent, and the addition of other assistants, or a solvent (the process will vary with type of fiber). Mordant- is a chemical substance, commonly a metal salt (alum, chrome, copper, iron, etc.) that combines with a dye to form an insoluble compound, thus fixing a color permanently. An adjective dyes which have no affinity for the fiber, require a mordant to fix the color onto the fibers of the fabric. A mordant can be applied to the fibric befor or during the dying. Greige goods – fabrics that have not received finishing treatments such as bleaching, brushing, embossing, or dyeing, unfinished fabrics. Yarn dyeing – the dyeing of a yarn before it is woven or knit into a fabric. Piece dyeing – the yarns used are not colored – the fabrics are dyed after it has been woven or knit. Garment dyeing – the dyeing of a completed garment. Stock dyeing – the dyeing staple fibers before they are spun into the yarn. Shibori – variety of ways of embellishing textiles by shaping cloth and securing it before dyeing – squeeze, press, and twist- manipulating fabric. To treat cloth as 2-dimensional surface with shibori and give 3-dimensional form by folding, twisting, clamping, stitching, plucking or pleating. To shape cloth by these methods and then secure in a number of ways by binding or knotting; tie-dye is a part of shibori.

17 NATURAL DYEING AND SHIBORI WHAT IS SHIBORI? TECHNIQUES OF SHIBORI Read: Shibori Vocabulary of Natural dyeing PROJECT: Shibori Scarf with Natural Dyeing.

18 BEST REFERENCES OF NATURAL DYEING


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