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Biodiversity at the World Bank Dr Kathy MacKinnon Lead Biodiversity Specialist Environment Department The World Bank February 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "Biodiversity at the World Bank Dr Kathy MacKinnon Lead Biodiversity Specialist Environment Department The World Bank February 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 Biodiversity at the World Bank Dr Kathy MacKinnon Lead Biodiversity Specialist Environment Department The World Bank February 2006

2  $5.1 billion (492 projects)  250+ PA projects ($3.3b)  105 countries, 37 multi-country  35% IBRD & IDA lending  21% GEF  50%+ forest ecosystems 1.World Bank Support for Biodiversity

3 2. FY05 Bank Biodiversity projects $5.1 billion

4  Amazon Region Protected Areas  Strengthen 12.5 m ha PAs  New 28.5 m ha PAs in Amazon rainforest  Est. Tumucumaque 1.9m ha  Rain Forest Trust Fund ($124m)  Indigenous Lands – land titling  Extractive reserves 3. Amazon Basin

5 4. East Asia  Kerinci-Seblat ICDP (1.4m ha), Indonesia  Virachey N.P. Cambodia (indigenous mapping)  Forest protection & Rural Development, Central Highlands, Vietnam (ICDP)  Indonesia Tsunami Rebuilding - $17.5 m for protection of Leuser Ecosystem, Aceh

6 5. Congo Basin  Congo - Wildlands Protection and Management  Regional Environmental Information and Mapping (REIMP)  Cameroon Biodiversity Conservation and Management  Forest sector reform Cameroon (DPL)  Forest sector reform DRC, including PA support  Forest Law Enforcement and Governance (FLEG) – ministerial agreements

7 6. Eastern Europe & Central Asia  Russia Far East - Sustainable Forestry  Khabarovsky Habitat Protection -tigers  Central Asia Transboundary (West Tien Shan)  Eastern Caucasus – Georgia  Azerbaijan PAs

8 7. Large Landscape - Regional Partnerships in MesoAmerica THE MABC Initiative: Components provide the “glue” to national conservation efforts  2.PROMOTION  /COMMUNICATION  STRATEGY 1.MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING TOOLS 3.MAINSTREAMING 4.CAPACITY BUILDING

9 8. Marine Conservation  Large Marine Ecosystems, MPAs, ICZM  COREMAP, Komodo, Indonesia  MesoAmerican Barrier Reef System  Coral Reef Targeted Research

10 9. Strategic Partnerships  Global partnerships (GEF, CBD and other international agreements), Millennium Ecosystem Assessment  CGIAR network - CIFOR  NGO Partnerships: WWF/World Bank Alliance for Forests, Critical Ecosystems Partnership Fund, Global Invasive Species Programme, Forest Trends, EcoAgriculture, Alliance of Religions and Conservation.  Partnerships with private sector: CEOs Forum on Forests, World Business Council for Sustainable Development, IFC.  Local Language Field Guides Program (99 guides)

11 10. Bank/WWF Global Forest Alliance 2005 targets:  50 million hectares of new protected areas  50 m ha more effectively managed Pas  200 m ha sustainably managed forest  Achievements:  28.5 m ha Amazon rainforest (ARPA, Brazil)  Certification for SFM in Vietnam  Tools for PA management effectiveness

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13 11. Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF)  Conservation International (CI), Global Environment Facility (GEF), World Bank, Govt. of Japan, MacArthur Foundation  $125m – 15 hotspots (from 19 eligible)  $73 million grants awarded  570 partners in 34 countries  Next: W Ghats, Sri Lanka, Indochina

14 12. Challenges & Opportunities  Conservation Finance  Measuring biodiversity impact  Logging & wildlife trade  Biodiversity-poverty linkages  Payments for Ecosystem Services  Invasive alien species

15 13. Conservation Finance  Conservation Trust Funds for Protected Areas - Peru, Bolivia, Bhutan, Uganda  Vietnam Conservation Fund  Direct payments to maintain wildlife corridors (Kenya)  Tradable development rights - Brazil

16 14. Measuring Biodiversity Impact  Simple tools to use at project sites e.g. PA management effectiveness tool  RAPPAM – network level  Simple tools for assessing SFM  Biodiversity impact in production landscape e.g. impact of agricultural practices.

17 15. Logging and Wildlife Trade  Well managed forests - effective extension of the conservation estate, supplementing PA network  FLEG: AFR, EAP, ECA –illegal logging (costs up to $5 billion annually in lost revenues)  Analysis of wildlife trade (East Asia, Congo Basin)  Costs & benefits of improved regulation to stop wildlife harvesting in forest concessions  Improved certification to include biodiversity

18 16. Poverty-Biodiversity Linkages  Forest governance and management systems to increase benefits to local communities  Synergies between biodiversity and community benefits (problems with ICDPs – what are win-wins?)  Lessons learned and BP for SFM and community forestry   Protected Areas and Indigenous Peoples, how to generate social and conservation outcomes  Ecosystem services to generate benefits for forest stewardship

19 17. Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES)  Linking forest protection to downstream agriculture e.g. Madagascar (additional 6m ha protected)  Ecomarkets project in Costa Rica  Integrated Silvopastoral approach to ecosystem management (Colombia, Nicaragua, Costa Rica)  Carbon Funds, especially BioCarbon Fund  Effective mechanisms to generate sufficient short- term returns for long-term protection

20 18. Invasive Alien Species 2nd greatest threat to biodiversity, esp. on islands  Reduce crop yields, Land degradation  Ecosystems services, water quality & quantity  Reduce lifespan of development investments, choke irrigation canals, HEP dams  Impact on poorest sections of society…..  Bank support to GISP secretariat & program  IAS projects: Lake Victoria, Mauritius, Seychelles

21 19. Invasive Alien Species Constraints to Development Annual Costs  Australia US$ 13 billion  Brazil US$ 50 billion  India US$ 116 billion  South Africa US$ 7 billion  UK US$ 12 billion  USAUS$140 billion  ( Source: Pimentel et al. 2001, National Geographic 2005)

22 20. IAS and Forestry  Deliberate & accidental introductions, including “Aid trade”  Rapid growth, tolerant of range of conditions  653 woody species invasive e.g. Acacia nilotica, Prosopis juliflora  22 of 43 worst invasives S. Africa –forestry, e.g. black wattle (estimated costs $1426 million)  Solutions linked to poverty alleviation – who gains, who loses?  Working for Water ($100m/annually to remove invasives)

23 Biodiversity at the World Bank  For more information please visit:


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