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Chapter 6: Biomes and Aquatic Ecosystems

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1 Chapter 6: Biomes and Aquatic Ecosystems
Notes Can Also Be Found at

2 Chapter 6 Notes Goal Explain what biomes and aquatic ecosystems are
Explain how biomes are characterized. Describe how net primary productivity varies among biomes. Give an introduction to your Biome Project Give an example of your Biome Project

3 What are the differences
What are the differences? Climate, Biology, Limiting Factors, Adaptations?

4 Things Change? Fossil evidence suggests that the frozen continent of Antarctica was once covered in temperate forest.

5 Earth’s Biomes Groups of terrestrial ecosystems that share biotic and abiotic conditions 10 primary biomes: tropical rain forest dry forest savanna desert temperate rain forest temperate forest temperate grassland chaparral boreal forest tundra

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11 La Mesa, CA

12 Philadelphia

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14 Climate: Average conditions, including temperature and precipitation, over long periods of time in a given area Weather: Day-to-day conditions in Earth’s atmosphere Climatographs: Diagrams that summarize an area’s average monthly temperature and precipitation Each biome has a set of characteristic organisms adapted to its particular climate conditions.

15 Across the U.S.

16 Productivity Net primary production: The amount of organic matter (biomass) that remains after primary producers use some to carry out cellular respiration Ecosystems vary in their net primary productivity, the rate at which primary producers convert energy to biomass. Warm, wet biomes generally have higher net primary productivity than cold, dry biomes.

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18 Earth’s productivity: On land forests are highly productive in dark green, deserts least in brown. At sea, red indicates high productivity and deep oceans dark blue.

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20 Aquatic Ecosystems (Wet Biomes)
75% of Earth’s surface is covered by water.

21 Salinity: the amount of dissolved salt present in water
Salinity: the amount of dissolved salt present in water. Ecosystems are classified as salt water, fresh water, or brackish depending on salinity. Photosynthesis tends to be limited by light availability, which is a function of depth and water clarity. Aquatic ecosystems are either flowing or standing. Aquatic ecosystem zones: photic, aphotic, benthic

22 Aquatic Ecosystem Limiting Factors
Limiting factors may include: Salinity Ph Sunlight Dissolved oxygen Temperature

23 Freshwater Ecosystems: Ponds, Lakes, Inland Seas
Salinity is less than 0.5 ppt (parts per thousand)

24 Freshwater Ecosystems: Wetlands
Areas of land flooded with water at least part of the year Include freshwater marshes, swamps, bogs, and fens

25 Freshwater Ecosystems: Rivers and Streams
Bodies of surface water that flow downhill, eventually reaching an ocean or inland sea Delaware Water Gap

26 Estuaries Occur where a river flows into the ocean or an inland sea
Coastal estuaries are brackish ecosystems; organisms must tolerate wide salinity and temperature ranges. Coastal estuaries are home to salt marshes and mangrove forests.

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28 Oceans Intertidal Areas Neritic Zones Open Ocean

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30 Chapter 6 Review Explain what biomes and aquatic ecosystems are
Explain how biomes are characterized. Describe how net primary productivity varies among biomes. Give an introduction to your Biome Project Give an example of your Biome Project

31 Biome Project Online

32 Biome Project PowerPoint Example
Temperate Rain Forest JUST AN EXAMPLE – 2-5 minutes Remember 60% for information Also found at

33 Environmental Science Class
Temperate Rain Forest For Mr. Manskopf Environmental Science Class By Mr. Manskopf November 2011

34 Temperate Rainforest…Where on Earth?
Small Biomes in Area Small Pockets Around World

35 Temperate Rain Forests Locations
Mid-Latitudes Usually near coastline Largest found in Pacific Northwest of U.S. and British Columbia in Canada

36 Climate of the Temperate Rain Forest
WET, Year Round Rain Moderate Temperatures

37 Why is it wet year round?

38 Species Found In Temperate Rain Forest
TREES: Cedars, Spruce, Hemlock, Douglas Fir Grow Tall/Fast Evergreens Coniferous Trees (seed-bearing cones) Compete for sunlight Commercially important

39 Species Found In Temperate Rain Forest
Damp conditions perfect for moss Slugs Numerous amphibian creatures Squirrels Deer Elk

40 Species Found In Temperate Rain Forest
Limiting Factors Sunlight Too much precipitation (Precipitation in Olympic's rain forest ranges from 140 to 167 inches (12 to 14 feet) every year.)

41 Threats Timber/Logging

42 Example Hoh Rain Forest

43 Temperate Rain Forest Cites
https://biomesfirst09.wikispaces.com/Temperate+Rainforest+Home


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