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Slide 7 - 2 Data collected from students in Statistics classes included their heights (in inches) and weights (in pounds): Data collected from students.

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Presentation on theme: "Slide 7 - 2 Data collected from students in Statistics classes included their heights (in inches) and weights (in pounds): Data collected from students."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Slide Data collected from students in Statistics classes included their heights (in inches) and weights (in pounds): Data collected from students in Statistics classes included their heights (in inches) and weights (in pounds): Here we see a positive association and a fairly straight form, although there seems to be a high outlier. Here we see a positive association and a fairly straight form, although there seems to be a high outlier. CORRELATION

3 Slide How strong is the association between weight and height of Statistics students? How strong is the association between weight and height of Statistics students? If we had to put a number on the strength, we would not want it to depend on the units we used. If we had to put a number on the strength, we would not want it to depend on the units we used. A scatterplot of heights (in centimeters) and weights (in kilograms) doesn’t change the shape of the pattern: A scatterplot of heights (in centimeters) and weights (in kilograms) doesn’t change the shape of the pattern: CHANGING UNITS

4 Slide 7 - 4STANDARDIZING Since the units don’t matter, why not remove them altogether? Since the units don’t matter, why not remove them altogether? We could standardize both variables and write the coordinates of a point as (z x, z y ). We could standardize both variables and write the coordinates of a point as (z x, z y ). Here is a scatterplot of the standardized weights and heights: Here is a scatterplot of the standardized weights and heights:

5 Slide CORRELATION (CONT.) Note that the underlying linear pattern seems steeper in the standardized plot than in the original scatterplot. Note that the underlying linear pattern seems steeper in the standardized plot than in the original scatterplot. That’s because we made the scales of the axes the same. That’s because we made the scales of the axes the same. Equal scaling gives a neutral way of drawing the scatterplot and a fairer impression of the strength of the association. Equal scaling gives a neutral way of drawing the scatterplot and a fairer impression of the strength of the association.

6 Slide CORRELATION (CONT.) Some points (those in green) strengthen the impression of a positive association between height and weight. Some points (those in green) strengthen the impression of a positive association between height and weight. Other points (those in red) tend to weaken the positive association. Other points (those in red) tend to weaken the positive association. Points with z-scores of zero (those in blue) don’t vote either way. Points with z-scores of zero (those in blue) don’t vote either way.

7 Slide CORRELATION (CONT.) The correlation coefficient (r) gives us a numerical measurement of the strength of the linear relationship between the explanatory and response variables. The correlation coefficient (r) gives us a numerical measurement of the strength of the linear relationship between the explanatory and response variables.

8 Positive Correlation In general, both sets of data increase together. Correlation Coefficient The closer r is to 1, the stronger the positive correlation. An example of a positive correlation between two variables would be the relationship between studying for an examination and class grades. As one variable increases, the other would also be expected to increase. Negative Correlation. In general, one set of data decreases as the other set increases. Correlation Coefficient The closer r is to -1, the stronger the negative correlation. An example of a negative correlation between two variables would be the relationship between absentiism from school and class grades. As one variable increases, the other would be expected to decrease. No Correlation. Sometimes data sets are not related and there is no general trend. Correlation Coefficient The closer r is to zero, the weaker the correlation. A correlation of zero does not always mean that there is no relationship between the variables. It simply means that the relationship is not linear. For example, the correlation between points on a circle or a regular polygon would be zero or very close to zero, but the points are very predictably related.

9 PERFECT CORRELATION COEFFICIENT VALUES Reminder – these are likely to RARELY happen with real data. Reminder – these are likely to RARELY happen with real data.

10 EXAMPLES – POSITIVE CORRELATIONS

11 Slide APPLY IT: For the students’ heights and weights, the correlation is For the students’ heights and weights, the correlation is What does this mean in terms of strength? What does this mean in terms of strength?

12 Slide CORRELATION CONDITIONS Correlation measures the strength of the linear association between two quantitative variables. Correlation measures the strength of the linear association between two quantitative variables. Before you use correlation, you must check several conditions: Before you use correlation, you must check several conditions: Quantitative Variables Condition Quantitative Variables Condition Straight Enough Condition Straight Enough Condition Outlier Condition Outlier Condition

13 Slide QUANTITATIVE VARIABLES CONDITION: Correlation applies only to quantitative variables. Correlation applies only to quantitative variables. Don’t apply correlation to categorical data masquerading as quantitative. Don’t apply correlation to categorical data masquerading as quantitative. Check that you know the variables’ units and what they measure. Check that you know the variables’ units and what they measure.

14 Slide STRAIGHT ENOUGH CONDITION: You can calculate a correlation coefficient for any pair of variables. You can calculate a correlation coefficient for any pair of variables. But correlation measures the strength only of the linear association, and will be misleading if the relationship is not linear. But correlation measures the strength only of the linear association, and will be misleading if the relationship is not linear.

15 Slide OUTLIER CONDITION: Outliers can distort the correlation dramatically. Outliers can distort the correlation dramatically. An outlier can make an otherwise small correlation look big or hide a large correlation. An outlier can make an otherwise small correlation look big or hide a large correlation. It can even give an otherwise positive association a negative correlation coefficient (and vice versa). It can even give an otherwise positive association a negative correlation coefficient (and vice versa). When you see an outlier, it’s often a good idea to report the correlations with and without the point. When you see an outlier, it’s often a good idea to report the correlations with and without the point.

16 Slide CORRELATION PROPERTIES The sign of a correlation coefficient gives the direction of the association. The sign of a correlation coefficient gives the direction of the association. Correlation is always between –1 and +1. Correlation is always between –1 and +1. Correlation can be exactly equal to –1 or +1, but these values are unusual in real data because they mean that all the data points fall exactly on a single straight line. Correlation can be exactly equal to –1 or +1, but these values are unusual in real data because they mean that all the data points fall exactly on a single straight line. A correlation near zero corresponds to a weak linear association. A correlation near zero corresponds to a weak linear association.

17 Slide CORRELATION PROPERTIES (CONT.) Correlation treats x and y symmetrically: Correlation treats x and y symmetrically: The correlation of x with y is the same as the correlation of y with x. The correlation of x with y is the same as the correlation of y with x. Correlation has no units. Correlation has no units. Correlation is not affected by changes in the center or scale of either variable. Correlation is not affected by changes in the center or scale of either variable. Correlation depends only on the z-scores, and they are unaffected by changes in center or scale. Correlation depends only on the z-scores, and they are unaffected by changes in center or scale.

18 Slide CORRELATION PROPERTIES (CONT.) Correlation measures the strength of the linear association between the two variables. Correlation measures the strength of the linear association between the two variables. Variables can have a strong association but still have a small correlation if the association isn’t linear. Variables can have a strong association but still have a small correlation if the association isn’t linear. Correlation is sensitive to outliers. A single outlying value can make a small correlation large or make a large one small. Correlation is sensitive to outliers. A single outlying value can make a small correlation large or make a large one small.

19 LET’S PRACTICE


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