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Environmental and Climate Finance in a New World Christopher Marcoux DePauw University Michael Tierney The College of William and Mary www.aiddata.org.

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Presentation on theme: "Environmental and Climate Finance in a New World Christopher Marcoux DePauw University Michael Tierney The College of William and Mary www.aiddata.org."— Presentation transcript:

1 Environmental and Climate Finance in a New World Christopher Marcoux DePauw University Michael Tierney The College of William and Mary

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3 Environmental Impacts of Development Finance

4 Brown vs. Green Environmental Aid ProjectDonorRecipientYearAmount Aluminum RecyclingSwedenSerbia2001$28,215 Elephant Awareness EducationU.S.Zimbabwe2007$9,136 Waste Management / DisposalSpainBrazil2008$80,753 Water and SanitationUNICEFTajikistan2000$39,855

5 Annual Environmental Aid, Source:

6 Annual Environmental Aid, Source:

7 Bargaining Theory and Aid Allocations Weaker Donor Outside Options Stronger Recipient Outside Options Donors More Dependent on Recipient Collaboration Donors Have Less Bargaining Power Donors Contribute Less Donors Contribute More Club Goods Present

8 Conjectures on Environmental Aid Allocation As recipients’ outside options weaken, donor allocation increases. As recipients’ outside options strengthen, donor allocation decreases. If donors’ outside options weaken, donor allocations to multilateral organizations will likely decrease. However, donors’ direct activity (e.g. provision of bilateral aid) may remain constant or even increase. If donors do not internalize the entire benefit of global public goods (e.g. mitigating climate change), donors may strengthen their outside options by shifting from multilateral to bilateral aid provision. The presence of Club Goods tends to increase donor allocation.

9 Trends in Green Aid Delivery, Source:

10 Trends in Brown Aid Delivery, Source:

11 The Future of the Green Climate Fund? Developing countries have been united in their demands for climate funds to be administered by the UNFCCC and COP to the Kyoto Protocol. Related demands have been for ‘direct access’ to funds, in which national governments in recipient countries administer funds through NIEs. While the steps toward establishing the GCF have been celebrated as a victory, questions remain regarding how much funding it will govern. Only about 2 per cent of Fast Start climate funds have been channeled through COP and Kyoto Protocol (KP) Funds, with limited consistent or predictable sources of revenue (Ciplet et al. 2013). The creation of funding structures that reflect principles of adaptation finance justice may be largely hollow victories.

12 What AidData Can Do... Track nearly all climate finance in one place using existing technology Leverage open data, linkages, current standards and partnerships Consistently identify climate adaptation and mitigation activities across all donors and systems By doing so, we would create a quantum leap in transparency and increased participation in monitoring Improve targeting and effectiveness of climate finance through mapping and evaluation

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14 Composition of Multilateral Environmental Aid, Source:

15 Composition of Bilateral Environmental Aid, Source:


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