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Goal 7.  Investigative journalists who wrote exposés on large corporations  Politicians who were willing to do anything to get reelected  Interest-group.

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Presentation on theme: "Goal 7.  Investigative journalists who wrote exposés on large corporations  Politicians who were willing to do anything to get reelected  Interest-group."— Presentation transcript:

1 Goal 7

2  Investigative journalists who wrote exposés on large corporations  Politicians who were willing to do anything to get reelected  Interest-group leaders who supported Progressive reforms  Philanthropists who pledged their money to eliminate corruption  Government officials who supervised the elimation of brothels

3  Investigative journalists who wrote exposés on large corporations

4  Town homes  Single-family housing  Tenements  Skyscrapers  Sod houses

5  Tenements

6  under mixed public and private control.  completely in private hands but that was regulated by the government.  completely under government control.  with a decentralized system of private state banks that operated without federal regulation.  under private control with no branches.

7  under mixed public and private control.

8  Susan B. Anthony  Jane Addams  Carrie Chapman Catt  Francis Willard  Harriet Tubman

9  Jane Addams

10  Few employers accepted any responsibility for the frequent accidents and illnesses.  Most employers had begun to provide generous vacations and retirement benefits.  Most had been convinced by progressive reformers that each employer had to take care of his or her own employees and help them prepare for a healthy retirement.  Few were prepared to deal with the problem themselves, but most had become convinced that the federal government should institute a workers' compensation program.  Most believed that programs to help workers during times of illness would result in a nation of sissies.

11  Few employers accepted any responsibility for the frequent accidents and illnesses.

12  Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois were key black leaders.  Lynchings were quite common, with anywhere from fifty to seventy occurring each year.  Most progressives believed that improving black American rights should be a high priority.  Black Americans typically could not vote.  William Lloyd Garrison led a campaign against lynchings.

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14  They were a method of imposing strict segregation in places like streetcars, trains, schools, parks, public buildings, and cemeteries.  They were declared in the Danbury Hatters case to be unconstitutional.  They were laws instituted by many northern municipalities in the early twentieth century in an effort to ensure honest and effective government.  They were federal laws outlawing discrimination in public accommodations.  They laws that set aside public monies to aid black Americans.

15  They were a method of imposing strict segregation in places like streetcars, trains, schools, parks, public buildings, and cemeteries

16  Businesses should adopt progressive reforms in an effort to make business more humane.  Business could increase efficiency by standardizing job routines and rewarding the fastest workers.  Businesses should combine several competing corporations into one larger holding company.  Corporations should narrow the scope of their business so that they could focus on the core areas they understood best.  Corporations should provide workers with better wages and working conditions in an effort to prevent government regulation or outside unionization.

17  Business could increase efficiency by standardizing job routines and rewarding the fastest workers.

18  They wanted to rid city governments of corruption.  They wanted to regulate and/or end private monopolies on water, gas, electricity, and public transportation.  They wanted to weaken party loyalty and reduce voter interest.  They wanted to improve sanitation conditions.  They wanted to bring efficiency and expertise to municipal government with professional managers and administrators.

19  They wanted to weaken party loyalty and reduce voter interest.

20  He was a progressive reformer who established policies that were labeled the Wisconsin Idea.  He was the Republican nominee for president in  He was the chief justice of the Supreme Court who fought against most progressive legislation.  He was the architect of Carnegie Hall.  He was the founder of the new version of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1910s.

21  He was a progressive reformer who established policies that were labeled the Wisconsin Idea.

22  The Sixteenth Amendment permits Congress to apportion and collect income taxes.  The Seventeenth Amendment allows the direct election of members of the House of Representatives.  The Eighteenth Amendment prohibited the manufacture and sale of alcohol.  The Nineteenth Amendment guarantees the right to vote for women.  All of these.

23  The Seventeenth Amendment allows the direct election of members of the House of Representatives.

24  Progressives wanted to restrain big business and protect the economically vulnerable.  Most progressives rejected the capitalist system, preferring a system based on cooperation for the good of the whole community.  Like the earlier Populist Movement, the Progressive Movement was primarily agrarian-based.  Progressives respected civil liberties so highly that they rejected any legislation that dealt with people's personal morals such as their sexual activities, drinking, and choice of entertainment.  All of these.

25  Progressives wanted to restrain big business and protect the economically vulnerable.

26  They should struggle militantly against all forms of racial discrimination to gain educational opportunity.  They should form a nationwide council to work for federal laws against lynching.  They should accommodate themselves to segregation and disenfranchisement while at the same time working hard and proving their economic value to society.  They should migrate to the cities and open shops and other small businesses.  They should leave the United States and return to their African origins.

27  They should accommodate themselves to segregation and disenfranchisement while at the same time working hard and proving their economic value to society.

28  the oil-refining business.  steel manufacturing.  the railroads.  the meatpacking industry.  the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

29  the meatpacking industry.

30  Local party bosses refused federal government assistance.  Congressmen believed only the president had the constitutional authority to regulate societal issues.  Americans believed that volunteer Christian organizations should take care of societal problems.  Most American leaders, regardless of party, believed in the laissez-faire doctrine and did not support a large governmental role in the economy.  Most leaders believed in communism's focus on individual decision making and not government-directed policy.

31  Most American leaders, regardless of party, believed in the laissez-faire doctrine and did not support a large governmental role in the economy.

32  giving voters the power to enact laws directly.  simplifying the procedure for voting by giving voters preprinted  ensuring the most qualified senators by shifting their election to the state legislatures.  having candidates for public office be selected by the party leadership rather than through the more cumbersome and time-consuming process of having all party members vote.  all of these.

33  giving voters the power to enact laws directly.

34  It was common in the coal mines and cotton mills.  It was uncommon because children were not strong enough to handle the large machines and fast pace of factory production.  It was uncommon because children had to stay in school until age sixteen.  It was uncommon because, for the first time, childhood was seen as a distinct stage of life reserved for innocence, play, education, and maternal love.  It was common in the economically depressed South, but it was uncommon in the prosperous North.

35  It was common in the coal mines and cotton mills.

36  The exodus from rural and small-town America  The increasing birthrate within the cities themselves  Immigration  Medical advances that ended the major urban diseases  Improvements in sanitation

37  Immigration

38  It revealed that industrialists cared about the best interest of their workers.  It revealed the effectiveness of state regulation of factories.  It revealed just how little Woodrow Wilson understood about fire safety.  It revealed that most Americans cared very little for black workers.  It revealed how abusive factory working conditions could be.

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40  Meat Inspection Act  Pure Food and Drug Act  Narcotics Act  All of these  None of these

41  All of these

42  It weakened the Sherman Anti-Trust Act.  It placed more restrictions on business activities that could lead to the formation of a monopoly.  It prohibited companies from having more than 500 employees.  All of these.  None of these.

43  It placed more restrictions on business activities that could lead to the formation of a monopoly.

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