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Area 4: Walsall South March 2015 Version 1.1

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1 Area 4: Walsall South March 2015 Version 1.1
Area Partnership Profile Area 4: Walsall South March 2015 Version 1.1

2 Profile Structure Geography, Demographics, Deprivation & Social Segmentation Economy & Employment Education & Young People Health & Wellbeing Crime & Community Safety Annex A: Guidance notes, useful links and acknowledgements (Includes help with interpreting charts that reference confidence intervals)

3 1 Geography, Demographics, Deprivation & Social Segmentation

4 Key Issues Relatively young population profile, with a higher than borough average proportion of children and younger adults Very diverse ethnic mix, with a large (and increasing) Asian population Variable levels of life expectancy across the Area Partnership High levels of privately rented properties and under 65s living alone Broad east/west divide in deprivation levels, with extremely high deprivation in the west and around the town centre but very low deprivation in the east Diverse social mix, with higher than average proportions of both low income families and successful professionals

5 Geography Covers 17.48 sq km (1,748 ha)
Wards and Community Areas Covers sq km (1,748 ha) Makes up 16.9% of the area of Walsall borough Population density of 35 people per hectare (higher than borough average of 26) The End Source: Ordnance Survey; ONS, Mid-2013 Population Estimates

6   Population Structure Total Population: 60,600
90+ 5 - 9 0 - 4 Total Population: 60,600 Younger age profile than borough overall More young children and younger working age in particular Much fewer older people aged 45+ The End Source: ONS, Mid-2013 Population Estimates

7 Ethnicity Pakistani: 17.6% Indian: 13.9% Bangladeshi: 6.4%
Other Asian: 3.7% Minority ethnic groups (Asian in particular) account for a majority of residents, almost double the borough average (Walsall av. 23.1%) Source: ONS, 2011 Census The End

8 Female Life Expectancy
Average life expectancy (LE) for females in Walsall is 82.7 years All wards within Walsall North have significantly lower LE for females than the borough average, with the exception of Paddock (84 yrs) The End Source: PHMF , Life Expectancy Tool

9 Male Life Expectancy Average life expectancy (LE) for males in Walsall is 77.8 years All wards within Walsall North have significantly lower male LE than the borough average, with the exception of Paddock (79.4 yrs) Source: PHMF , Life Expectancy Tool

10 Household Composition
22,040 households (with at least 1 usual resident) Increase of 8.0% since 2001 (Walsall av. 6.0%) Average household size: 2.7 (Walsall av. 2.5) The End Above average proportion of adults under 65 living alone Source: ONS, Census 2011

11 Housing Tenure High proportion of privately rented properties
Average level of socially rented, and slightly below average owner occupied households 10.7% of households ‘overcrowded’* (Walsall av. 6.5%) 3.3% of households without central heating (Walsall av. 2.8%) The End Source: ONS, Census *ONS measure – based on (room) occupancy rating of -1 or less

12 Deprivation Broad east/west split in levels of deprivation.
Areas close to the Town Centre, Caldmore and Pleck experience very high levels of deprivation. Some n’hoods in Gillity and Park Hall are among least deprived quarter in England. The End Source: DCLG, Index of Multiple Deprivation, 2010

13 Deprivation Residents in AP4 are relatively more deprived than national and borough average. 1 in 2 residents (55%, over 30,000 people) experience levels of severe multiple deprivation (in the worst 20% in country) – compared with 44% across Walsall overall. Only 9% live in the least deprived quintile in England, slightly less than the 12% across Walsall overall. The End Source: DCLG, Index of Multiple Deprivation, 2010

14 Social Segmentation The largest group of households (32.4%) are classified as group I – Urban Cohesion: ‘Residents of settled urban communities with a strong sense of identity’ Key Features Settled extended families City suburbs Multicultural Own 3 bedroom homes Sense of community Younger generation interested in technology The End Source: Experian, Mosaic Public Sector 2014

15 2 Economy and Employment

16 Key Issues Presence of Walsall town centre in the Area means a high number of workplaces, with above borough average density. Retail sector is particularly important locally. Very low level of economically active adults compared with Walsall average, with especially low numbers in full time employment: 2 in 5 women and 1 in 5 men are economically inactive (i.e. out of the labour market altogether). Slightly higher than borough and national average levels of out‐of‐work benefit dependency. Levels of adult basic skills (literacy, numeracy and ICT) similar to borough average, but with a relatively high proportion of adults with higher level qualifications.

17 Businesses 95.5% of workplaces are private sector / 4.5% public sector. The Area has a much higher density of businesses per resident than the borough average, but still below national level. 2,275 workplaces* The End Source: ONS, BRES 2014 *A workplace is a ‘local unit’: an individual site (for example a factory or shop) associated with an enterprise.

18 Industrial Sectors Above average for:
Retail (Walsall 13.3%) Health (Walsall 7.2%) Strategically important companies include: Barhale Construction Plc (Construction) European Food Brokers (Wholesale, Retail, Trade) The Staffing Group (Professional Services) The End Source: ONS, BRES 2014

19 Economic Activity % of working age residents (aged 16-64) who are:
Employed: % Full time: 33.9% Part time: 16.3% Self-employed: 8.6% Unemployed: 10.0% Retired: 4.3% Student (inc full time): 8.4% Looking after home/family: 8.3% Long term sick/disabled: 5.8% Other: 4.6% Economically Active: % Economically Inactive : 31.3% 77.9% 59.3% 22.1% 40.7% The End Source: ONS, Census 2011

20 Unemployment and Benefits
Over 1 in 7 adults (5,750) dependent on an out-of-work benefit. Slightly above borough level and well above national level of claimants. Largest group are those on employment support allowance/incapacity benefit: 3,100 people. The End Source: DWP, Working Age Client Group, May 2014

21 Jobseekers JSA claimant count Jan15: 1,367 claimants
JSA claimant rate: 3.6% of yr olds (Walsall 3.1%, England 1.9%) Young claimants (18-24): 5.7% (Walsall 5.4%, England 2.9%) Average (median) length of claims: 21.6 weeks (Walsall 22.5, England 19.5) The End Source: ONS, Jobseeker’s Allowance Claimant Count, Jan 2008 – Jan 2015

22 Basic Skills Adult literacy, numeracy and ICT skills similar to borough average. 1 in 2 adults have literacy skills at a good GCSE level or above. 3 in 5 adults have numeracy skills below GCSE level. Entry Level (and below) Level 1 Level 2 (and above) Literacy Area 4 18.6% 31.5% 50.0% Walsall 19.0% 31.9% 49.1% Numeracy 59.8% 23.4% 16.8% 58.0% 25.0% 17.0% ICT* 35.8% 27.1% 37.1% 34.9% 28.1% 37.0% · Entry Level: Pre-GCSE · Level 1: Equivalent to GCSE grades C - G · Level 2: Equivalent to GCSE grades A*- C *Based on Multiple Choice test of ICT knowledge The End Source: BIS, Skills for Life Survey 2011

23 Qualifications Over 1 in 5 working age residents (approx 8,550 people) have no formal qualifications. However, similar number hold degree level qualifications (better than borough average). · None: No formal qualifications · Level 1: 1-4 GCSEs or equivalent qualifications · Level 2: 5 GCSEs or equivalent qualifications · Level 3: 2 or more A-levels or equivalent qualifications · Level 4+: Bachelors degree or equivalent, and higher qualifications · A’ship: Apprenticeship · Other: including foreign qualifications The End Source: ONS, Census 2011

24 3 Education and Young People (Note: See Annex A for guidance on interpreting slides containing confidence intervals)

25 Key Issues Improvement in educational attainment, particularly at Key Stage 4 (GCSE) and Key Stage 5 (AS/Alevel) Low take up of the childcare element of tax credits amongst low income families (for a variety of reasons) Main child health issues in the area are: Infant and perinatal mortality Low birth weight Childhood obesity Unintentional and deliberate injuries in 0‐5 year olds

26 Perinatal / Infant Mortality
Chuckery and Delves areas within AP 4 have highest rates of infant mortality from 2010 to 2014 in comparison to the Walsall average (7.6). Most communities within AP4 have higher perinatal mortality rates (babies who are still born or die within 7 days of birth) than the Walsall average (4.16) except Chuckery and Park Hall. Source for Peri and IM is CDOP (different from what was used last time) Source: Child Death Overview Panel,

27 Low Birth Weight Source: Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust, Care Plus The End Alumwell, Palfrey, Pleck and Walsall Central communities are statistically significantly higher than the Walsall average.

28 Childhood Obesity Source: National Child Measurement Programme The End Across AP4 the proportion of obesity in Reception (aged 4/5) and older (aged from 8 to 11) children are statistically significantly higher than the Walsall average.

29 Births to Teenage Mothers 13-17 years
Data source: Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust, Care Plus All communities except Chuckery and Walsall Central in area 4 are below the Walsall average (1.5%) with Palfrey being statistically significantly lower than Walsall average. The End

30 Emergency Admissions Unintentional / Deliberate Injuries in Children 0 to 4 Years
Source: Secondary Uses Service dataset and Public Health Outcome Framework The End Alumwell, Caldmore, Pleck and Walsall Central community areas in the area 4 have higher emergency admissions than the Walsall average (32.3).

31 4 Health & Wellbeing (Note: See Annex A for guidance on interpreting slides containing confidence intervals)

32 Key Issues Main health issues in the area are:
Prevention and early detection of long term conditions (Diabetes) Trauma related to fall and hip fractures (aged 65 and over) Alcohol admissions NHS health checks

33 Admissions to Hospital for Falls Aged 65 Years
Source: Secondary Uses Services (SUS) dataset 2011/12 – 2013/14 and Census 2011 population estimates for Walsall communities. Caveat: Community estimations were derived by using SUS patient postcode sector and allocating postcode sectors to each community area with greatest number of postcode sectors. The End Alumwell and Chuckery community areas are statistically significantly higher rate of admissions to hospital for falls in people aged 65+ than Walsall average (33.9 per 1,000).

34 Residents with identified Carers
The charts show the number of service users who have an identified, informal carer per 1,000 clients resident within the Ward or Area. There are differences between areas of the borough which identifies where a need to support carers exists.

35 Hip Fracture Hospital Admissions
Source: Secondary Uses Services (SUS) dataset 2011/12 – 2013/14 and Census 2011 population estimates for Walsall communities. Caveat: Community estimations were derived by using SUS patient postcode sector and allocating postcode sectors to each community area with greatest number of postcode sectors. The End Most communities (with recorded admissions) within Area 4 had higher rate of admissions due to hip trauma in people aged 65 and over than the Walsall average (22.7 per 1,000) except Delves, Hatherton and Walsall Central.

36 Dementia Prevalence Source: Quality and Outcomes Framework 2013/14 and Public Health Outcome Framework Caveat: GP practice location used as estimate for corresponding community and area partnership prevalence rather than patient location. The End All communities within AP4 are statistically significantly lower than Walsall and national averages except Caldmore.

37 Diabetes Prevalence Source: Quality and Outcomes Framework 2013/14 and Public Health Outcome Framework Caveat: GP practice location used as estimate for corresponding community and area partnership prevalence rather than patient location. The End Most community areas in Area 4 have higher estimated prevalence for diabetes than Walsall average (8.7%), with the exception of Caldmore and Delves which are statistically significantly lower than Walsall average.

38 Mental Illness Prevalence
Source: Quality and Outcomes Framework 2013/14 and Public Health Outcome Framework Caveat: GP practice location used as estimate for corresponding community and area partnership prevalence rather than patient location. The End Most communities in area 4 have higher estimated prevalence for mental health than Walsall (0.85%) and national average (0.86%). Walsall central is statistically significantly higher than the Walsall average.

39 Depression Prevalence
Source: Quality and Outcomes Framework 2013/14 and Public Health Outcome Framework Caveat: GP practice location used as estimate for corresponding community and area partnership prevalence rather than patient location. The End All communities within AP4 have a statistically significantly lower estimated prevalence for Depression than Walsall (7%) and national average (6.5%) except Walsall central.

40 Learning Disabilities Prevalence
Source: Quality and Outcomes Framework 2013/14 and Public Health Outcome Framework Caveat: GP practice location used as estimate for corresponding community and area partnership prevalence rather than patient location. The End Caldmore, Palfrey and Pleck communities have a higher estimated prevalence for Learning Disability than Walsall (0.47%) and national average (0.48%).

41 % Health Check Uptake 40 to 74 Years
The End Source: Health Intelligence Caveat: GP practice location used as estimate for corresponding community and area partnership prevalence rather than patient location. The Alumwell community has a significantly higher uptake than the Walsall average, while all others in the area are lower than the average.

42 Alcohol Admissions Rate
The End Source: Secondary Uses Service (SUS) - NHS Midlands and Lancashire CSU A large variation within this areas, with Park Hall being one of the lowest in the Borough and Walsall Central being the highest in the Borough.

43 5 Crime & Community Safety

44 Key Issues Relatively high level of crime in the Area as a whole — although crime across the borough is currently at an all time low Town centre is a particular hot spot for crime and anti‐social behaviour within the Area Partnership as reflected in existence of town centre Police Priority Area. Theft from shops and stalls is the most commonly recorded type of crime

45 Geography The Area Partnership is within the South Walsall Police Sector It is covered by the following 4 Police Neighbourhoods (which are coextensive with ward boundaries) Paddock Palfrey Pleck St Matthews There are three areas in Walsall that have been identified as priority areas for crime and community safety issues, based on an analysis of key datasets. These areas have been identified by a range of local partnership services as they experience a relatively high number of repeat incidents that create multiple demands. Whilst short and medium term plans and activity take place, a longer term partnership wide approach is seen as necessary to resolve key issues in these areas. Walsall Town Centre Bloxwich Birchills

46 Anti-Social Behaviour
Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB) incident hotspots, Jan - Dec 14 The map (right) shows hotspots of Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB) incidents within the Area Partnership. Data includes Police reported ASB offences 1st January – 31st December 2014, along with partnership data from the ASB Unit, Beechdale, Caldmore Accord, Clean and Green, Environmental Health, Fire Service, Trading Standards, Walsall Housing Group and Watmos. Walsall South has the highest level of ASB incidents across the borough accounting for 26.4% of all incidents. Although this AP does not have the highest rate of incidents with 91.8 ASB incidents per 1,000 residents being the third most prevalent AP but still sitting above the Walsall average of 77.5. There are a number of prevalent areas across the AP but the main areas are the Town Centre extending into Caldmore and the border between Pleck and Birchills-Leamore. Source: Walsall Partnership Jan – Dec 14

47 Crime Rates Recorded crimes by type, per 1,000 residents (mid-2013) population, Jan 14 – Dec 14 Crime across the borough has seen a slight increase of 7.6% comparing Jan13 – Dec13 against the period of Jan14 - Dec14. This was an increase of 1,205 victims of crime. Of the six AP’s, Walsall South has the highest Total Recorded Crime with 31.4% of all offenses in the borough committed here, although this is to be expected with this area containing the town centre. There are over 25 more crimes committed per 1,000 residents than in Walsall overall (87.57 in Walsall South compared to in Walsall). The chart above shows that rates for all crime types are above the Walsall average with particular reference to Violent Crime which sits well above the borough average. Source: West Midlands Police, 2014

48 The Top 3 issues identified in the local area in wave 36
Perception of problems: Respondents to the feeling the difference survey conducted by bmg research on behalf of West Midlands Police were asked to identify their top three issues in their locality. The graph on the left shows the top issues identified by respondents. Walsall residents hold perceptions that predominantly fall in line with the Force average and there has been no significant movements since Wave 35 in any of the key indicator measures. There is a clear divide by Constituency, with the most positive views held by residents in Aldridge Brownhills and Walsall South, and the least in Walsall North. Public confidence in the police is most likely to be increased if the local police are viewed to ‘deal with things that matter to communities’, ‘be relied on to be there when needed’, and ‘work with people in the community to improve neighbourhoods’.

49 Annex A: Guidance notes, useful links & acknowledgements

50 Understanding Confidence Intervals (CI)
1 Below is an explanation of charts that include 95% confidence intervals (CI) to help you understand how to interpret their meanings. 3 The example chart shows Respiratory mortality per 1,000 population. The results relating to the AP for which this profile relates are coloured red. 2 The dotted line running through the chart shows the average rate of respiratory mortality across the whole of Walsall. The Confidence Interval symbol I represents how sure we are in the actual result within a +/- margin of error at 95% CI . 1. Statistically significantly higher: If the overall CI -/+ range lies entirely above comparison average line then the result is seen as statistically significantly higher than the borough average. Example #1 North Walsall. 2. Statistically significantly lower If it lies entirely below the comparison average line then the result is seen as statistically significantly lower than the borough average. Example # 2 Chuckery. 3. Within normal range If the CI -/+ range crosses the average line at any point then the result is not seen as statistically significant but the actual result maybe still be higher or lower than the average. Example # 3 Moxley. NB in this example a lower rate is better, in some charts a higher rate is better.

51 Useful Links Walsall Intelligence: Data and intelligence portal for Walsall Partnership, including links to profiles, needs assessments and additional resources 2011 Census: Information related to the release of the latest census results, including analysis and reports for Walsall and links to official ONS websites Neighbourhood Statistics: Office for National Statistics website providing a wealth of small‐area data on people, health, work, education, housing, crime and the environment. Nomis: detailed and up‐to‐date UK labour market and economic statistics from official sources

52 Contact: WalsallIntelligence@walsall.gov.uk or call 01922 652509
Produced by : Walsall Intelligence Network (WIN) – Analytical / Performance Group Contact: or call March 2015 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS These profiles have been compiled by core analysts from across the WALSALL INTELLIGENCE NETWORK (WIN): Liz Connolly (Strategic Regeneration, Walsall Council), Martin Ewin (Public Health – Walsall Council), Karen Marcroft (Children’s Quality Assurance and Performance – Walsall Council) Kevin Slater (Social Care Performance – Walsall Council), Richard Rawlinson (Business & Partnership Intelligence, Walsall Council), Contents are informed by input from analysts and service information specialists across WIN, including: Sarbjit Uppal, Ben Watkins, Angela Woodley Mapping used in this profile is reproduced from the Ordnance Survey mapping with the permission of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office. ©Crown Copyright. Unauthorised reproduction infringes Crown Copyright and may lead to prosecution or civil proceedings. Crown copyright and database rights (2015) Ordnance Survey A‐Z Mapping is reproduced by permission of Geographers' A‐Z Map Co. Ltd. © Crown Copyright All rights reserved. Walsall Council licence number


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