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Mini movie nite! (okay…afternoon) Screening of A Room with a View Wednesday 17 August 5.30 pm TDC Sign up today with Ms Yao Bring your texts!!!

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Presentation on theme: "Mini movie nite! (okay…afternoon) Screening of A Room with a View Wednesday 17 August 5.30 pm TDC Sign up today with Ms Yao Bring your texts!!!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Mini movie nite! (okay…afternoon) Screening of A Room with a View Wednesday 17 August 5.30 pm TDC Sign up today with Ms Yao Bring your texts!!!

2 A Room with a View Revision lecture Approaches to the context question

3 Typical wording Write a critical appreciation of the following passage paying particular attention too… The wording seldom changes significantly although you will be prompted on an aspect of the passage that may be of particular literary interest In recent years many paper 1 prose questions have focused on the author’s presentation of character, thematic concept, setting etc

4 What are the main expectations? The majority of the answer should be centred around the passage itself There should be clear, explicit literary analysis that shows an awareness and familiarity with the author’s style The essay should feature a significant amount of close reference to the chosen text howing how the style ‘operates’

5 The extract Opening of Chapter 14 (p132 – 133) “Of course Miss Bartlett accepted” – “…a somewhat lugubrious sextet upon the upper lawn for tea” Focus – a potential ‘turning point’ in the plot as Lucy receives news of Charlotte’s imminent arrival George’s presence continues to play on Lucy’s mind She is able to ‘dismiss’ her emotional response for the time being

6 Content and plot Of course Miss Bartlett accepted. And, equally of course, she felt sure that she would prove a nuisance, and begged to be given an inferior spare room – something with no view, anything. Her love to Lucy. And, equally of course, George Emerson could come to tennis on the Sunday week. Lucy faced the situation bravely, though, like most of us, she only faced the situation that encompassed her. She never gazed inwards. If at times strange images rose from the depths, she put them down to nerves. When Cecil brought the Emersons to Summer Street, it had upset her nerves. Charlotte would burnish up past foolishness, and this might upset her nerves. She was nervous at night. When she talked to George – they met again almost immediately at the Rectory – his voice moved her deeply, and she wished to remain near him. How dreadful if she really wished to remain near him! Of course, the wish was due to nerves, which love to play such perverse tricks upon us. Once she had suffered from "things that came out of nothing and meant she didn't know what." Now Cecil had explained psychology to her one wet afternoon, and all the troubles of youth in an unknown world could be dismissed.

7 Content and plot Of course Miss Bartlett accepted. And, equally of course, she felt sure that she would prove a nuisance, and begged to be given an inferior spare room – something with no view, anything. Her love to Lucy. And, equally of course, George Emerson could come to tennis on the Sunday week. Lucy faced the situation bravely, though, like most of us, she only faced the situation that encompassed her. She never gazed inwards. If at times strange images rose from the depths, she put them down to nerves. When Cecil brought the Emersons to Summer Street, it had upset her nerves. Charlotte would burnish up past foolishness, and this might upset her nerves. She was nervous at night. When she talked to George – they met again almost immediately at the Rectory – his voice moved her deeply, and she wished to remain near him. How dreadful if she really wished to remain near him! Of course, the wish was due to nerves, which love to play such perverse tricks upon us. Once she had suffered from "things that came out of nothing and meant she didn't know what." Now Cecil had explained psychology to her one wet afternoon, and all the troubles of youth in an unknown world could be dismissed.

8 Content points and how to write about them Do not paraphrase what is happening in the passage! Your opening paragraph should have established an overview of where the extract ‘fits’ in the schema of the novel –e.g. “The passage comes at a point where Lucy is clearly confused about her emotions towards both Cecil and George. This is very much in line with Forster’s approach to the bildungsroman and how Lucy in particular is shown to be “muddled”. The narrative very effectively prompts the reader to respond to Lucy’s current dilemma…”

9 Content points (contd) If we consider the highlighted sections, we can focus specifically on what Forster is emphasising here. Lucy is clearly ‘troubled’ at the prospect of charlotte’s imminent arrival This is due to Charlotte’s secret ‘confidence’ which has been kept since Chapter 7 Lucy’s confusion over her feelings is at the core of the novel and therefore the extract illustrates this concept

10 Content points What to quote? Do not merely copy ‘chunks’ for a content point. A paraphrase of key concerns will get to the point. Save major quotation for your language points

11 Language Points Consider what has been said in terms of content so far – what is the focus of the extract? Lucy’s muddle Charlotte’s arrival The ‘reassessment’ of George

12 Language points Of course Miss Bartlett accepted. And, equally of course, she felt sure that she would prove a nuisance, and begged to be given an inferior spare room – something with no view, anything. Her love to Lucy. And, equally of course, George Emerson could come to tennis on the Sunday week. Lucy faced the situation bravely, though, like most of us, she only faced the situation that encompassed her. She never gazed inwards. If at times strange images rose from the depths, she put them down to nerves. When Cecil brought the Emersons to Summer Street, it had upset her nerves. Charlotte would burnish up past foolishness, and this might upset her nerves. She was nervous at night. When she talked to George – they met again almost immediately at the Rectory – his voice moved her deeply, and she wished to remain near him. How dreadful if she really wished to remain near him! Of course, the wish was due to nerves, which love to play such perverse tricks upon us. Once she had suffered from "things that came out of nothing and meant she didn't know what." Now Cecil had explained psychology to her one wet afternoon, and all the troubles of youth in an unknown world could be dismissed.

13 Language points Note here how the focus from content shifts We are now more concerned with ‘what else’ is conveyed through the text The opening paragraph brings Charlotte ‘to life’ even though she is no yet present – how is this done? Narrative ‘voice’

14 Now start quoting! Charlotte’s key words (presumably from a letter) are ‘embedded’ in the narrative Charlotte does not want to be a “nuisance” etc. However, this is part of Forster’s satirical presentation – of course Charlotte will be a nuisance! This is brilliantly emphasised with the excessive apologies being followed by Charlotte ‘granting permission’ – “of course Mr Emerson could come…”

15 Start quoting Your quotations need to allow you to build a sense of purpose “Of course” – is used throughout the extract. It is derived from both Charlotte’s voice in paragraph 1 as well as Lucy’s in para 2. Note: this voice is NOT outwardly spoken – it is an inner contemplation What is Lucy doing? - an attempt at self- persuasion that reflects her insecurity

16 Why “nerves” The opening paragraphs are dominated by the concept of “nerves” In a Victorian context, “nerves” represents psychological disturbance as well as emotional disturbance. It is a euphemism that Forster uses on purpose to emphasise how Lucy is at this point in time falling back on the ‘wisdom’ of her elders Note: the final reference to Cecil’s advice is an extension of this concept – he refers to the newer study of Psychology BUT – how does Forster PRESENT this? –“Now Cecil had explained psychology to her one wet afternoon, and all the troubles of youth in an unknown world could be dismissed.”

17 The external and the internal Forster use his language very simply to identify two ‘forces’ at work (another binary!!!) “She only faced the situation that encompassed her” the use of the word “encompassed” immediately conveys the concept of not only the external forces but also of being ‘surrounded’ “She never gazed inwards” – note here the emphatic use of the word “never” – Lucy is not yet capable of understanding her inner feelings

18 It is obvious enough for the reader to conclude, "She loves young Emerson." A reader in Lucy's place would not find it obvious. Life is easy to chronicle, but bewildering to practise, and we welcome "nerves" or any other shibboleth that will cloak our personal desire. She loved Cecil; George made her nervous; will the reader explain to her that the phrases should have been reversed? But the external situation – she will face that bravely. The meeting at the Rectory had passed off well enough. Standing between Mr. Beebe and Cecil, she had made a few temperate allusions to Italy, and George had replied. She was anxious to show that she was not shy, and was glad that he did not seem shy either.

19 Dear Reader… One of the most significant techniques in the passage is the narrator’s DIRECT REFERENCE to the reader. “It is obvious enough for the reader to conclude” “…will the reader explain to her that the phrase should have been reversed?

20 Dear Reader What is the purpose and the effect of this? The writer (Forster) makes the reader explicitly aware that this is fiction. There is a sense that the reader cannot intrude upon the process of Lucy’s emotional learning – it is up to the author to decide her fate and this will happen in the course of the narrative. The approach also creates ironic humour – it is now obvious that Lucy must decide between Cecil and George but that this is not within the reader’s scope!

21 Dear Reader The technique can often be referred to as the writer being ‘self-aware’ For a moment the narrative ‘escape into another world’ is purposely broken and the reader also becomes aware of the fable- like nature of the tale itself

22 "A nice fellow," said Mr. Beebe afterwards "He will work off his crudities in time. I rather mistrust young men who slip into life gracefully.“ Lucy said, "He seems in better spirits. He laughs more.“ "Yes," replied the clergyman. "He is waking up.“ That was all. But, as the week wore on, more of her defences fell, and she entertained an image that had physical beauty. In spite of the clearest directions, Miss Bartlett contrived to bungle her arrival. She was due at the South-Eastern station at Dorking, whither Mrs. Honeychurch drove to meet her. She arrived at the London and Brighton station, and had to hire a cab up. No one was at home except Freddy and his friend, who had to stop their tennis and to entertain her for a solid hour. Cecil and Lucy turned up at four o'clock, and these, with little Minnie Beebe, made a somewhat lugubrious sextet upon the upper lawn for tea.

23 He is waking up Beebe’s observation that George “is waking up” is significantly ironic Lucy is the one who needs to ‘wake up’ Beebe is seen as perceptive but only in a limited sense

24 Humour In this extract, humour depends almost wholly upon Charlotte The false humility of her statements in para 1 Her arrival at the end of the extract – note the way Forster ambiguously phrases this…“Miss Bartlett contrived to bungle her arrival” Additional humour is ‘inserted’ by the concept of Freddy and his friend having to “entertain” her “for a solid hour” The closing sentence “a somewhat lugubrious sextet” emphasises the significant change in atmosphere that Charlotte brings to Windy Corner

25 Conclusions about context questions Do not spend time describing and explaining! Get down to worthwhile analysis Demonstrate an understanding of sentence structure (eg what difference is made by short or long sentences and parts of speech – active and passive verbs?)

26 Conclusions Only choose the context question if you are genuinely observant about LANGUAGE Think of how repetition, tense, perspective etc help to craft the ‘message’ Always consider how the extract ‘operates’ as part of the whole novel


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