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Economic Impacts of Aquatic Invasive Species Oconto County presentation Dale Mohr CNRED UW-Extension Originally Presented by Chad Cook Basin Educator August.

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Presentation on theme: "Economic Impacts of Aquatic Invasive Species Oconto County presentation Dale Mohr CNRED UW-Extension Originally Presented by Chad Cook Basin Educator August."— Presentation transcript:

1 Economic Impacts of Aquatic Invasive Species Oconto County presentation Dale Mohr CNRED UW-Extension Originally Presented by Chad Cook Basin Educator August 22 nd 2006

2 What are Invasive Species?   Definition: Non-native plants and animals that may cause economic, environmental, or recreational harm or affect human health.   Invasive because: No natural predators, parasites, etc. Often aggressive, prolific, and mature early (See Handouts and posters)

3 Plants Purple Loosestrife Eurasian Water-Milfoil Common Reed

4 Invertebrates Spiny & Fishhook Waterfleas Rusty Crayfish Zebra Mussels

5 Vertebrates White Perch Round Goby Alewife Sea Lamprey

6 Others  Quagga Mussels  Common Carp  Rainbow Smelt  Threespine Stickleback  Reed Canary Grass  Curly-Leaf Pondweed  Flowering Rush  ‘Cylindro’  And More

7 Future Threats?  Asian Carp  Snakehead  Three-spine stickleback  New Zealand mud snail  Numerous Plants: HydrillaHydrilla Water chestnutWater chestnut Water hyacynthWater hyacynth Water lettuceWater lettuce

8 AIS Economic Impacts In U.S.  Ecological damage & control costs: $9 billion annually (Pimentel, 2003) Fish - $5.4 billionFish - $5.4 billion Zebra/Quagga Mussels - $1 billionZebra/Quagga Mussels - $1 billion Plants - $500 millionPlants - $500 million

9 Zebra Mussels  Damage & control costs $1 billion annually (Pimentel et al., 2005)$1 billion annually (Pimentel et al., 2005) $5 billion annually (Lovell and Stone, 2005)$5 billion annually (Lovell and Stone, 2005)  Municipal and industrial water intake costs Small: $20,000 annuallySmall: $20,000 annually Large: $350,000 - $400,000 annually (Ruetter)Large: $350,000 - $400,000 annually (Ruetter)  Power plant costs (USGS) Hydropower: $83,000 annuallyHydropower: $83,000 annually Fossil fuel: $145,000 annuallyFossil fuel: $145,000 annually Nuclear: $822,000 annuallyNuclear: $822,000 annually

10 Sea Lamprey  Chemical Control - $13 million annually in Great Lakes  Release of sterile males  Barrier construction  Lake trout stocking program  Losses of other Lake Michigan sport and commercial fishes = $26 million/yr = $26 million/yr

11 Ruffe  Losses to native fishery: $500,000 annually (Lovell and Stone, 2005)

12 Eurasian Water-Milfoil & Curly-Leaf Pondweed  $400 - $600/ac to treat EWM/CLP in WI  $1.1 million spent for chemical treatment on 2,300 ac in 2003 in WI (DNR)

13 Purple Loosestrife  Spreading at 285,000 ac/yr  Losses and control: $45 million annually in U.S. (Pimentel et al., 2005)

14 Secondary Impacts – Difficult to measure  Nuisance Control  Property Values  Tourism  Fisheries  Health

15 Nuisance Algae  $4 million annually at each power plant on Lake Michigan on nuisance algae control (pers. comm. WE Energies)

16 Property Value Impacts  High potential from nuisance conditions created by AIS  Many costs born by riparians  Demand for lake front property remains strong

17 Property Value Impacts  Correlation between property value and water quality - clarity (Krysel et al., 2003)  Residential property value quantified as being at risk at approximately 10% due to EWM infestation (Deamud et al., 2004)  Infestation by hydrilla reduced property value by at least 10% (TVA, 1994 in Bell & Bonn, 2004) = Willingness to pay= Willingness to pay Complete control raised property values 17 – 35%Complete control raised property values 17 – 35%  No apparent impact of AIS on real estate market in Door County or Shawano Lake area (personal communication) Major effect is putting up with nuisance conditionsMajor effect is putting up with nuisance conditions  Studies to be conducted in Vilas County and Waupaca Chain O’Lakes in 2006

18 Tourism Impacts  Proliferation of EWM/CLP  Cladophora on beaches

19 Tourism Impacts  Value of day at the beach in Chicago estimated at $35/person (Shaikh, 2005)

20 Fishery Impacts  Lake Michigan fishery is comprised of many exotic species

21 Fishery Impacts  Zebra mussels are changing the Lake Michigan food chain  Potential to impact WI’s $120 million salmon and trout fishery

22 Uses of AIS Economic Data  Actual Costs to control AISCosts to control AIS oWater intake costs to control ZM oRiparians’ costs to control EWM Cost data for impacts other than control are sparseCost data for impacts other than control are sparse  Fear-Based Drives many AIS management decisionsDrives many AIS management decisions oRiparians fear reduction in property value oLocal gov’ts concerned about potential for reduced property tax revenue Fears can be realFears can be real

23 Summary  AIS cost estimates often vary widely, either due to actual differences in AIS impacts, or because of inconsistent estimation methodology  Many impacts have not been estimated or are difficult to economically assess  Economic fear drives many AIS management decisions  AIS cost estimates need to consider valuations other than just control costs – e.g., human health values, use values, existence values, or valuations of ecosystem services

24 AIS Management Messages Wisconsin’s Comprehensive AIS Management Plan 1.Prevent new introductions Collaborate with user groups representing potential transport vectors Collaborate with user groups representing potential transport vectors 2.Limit the spread of established populations Public awareness Public awareness Monitoring Monitoring 3.Abate the harmful impacts from AIS Develop control strategies Develop control strategies

25 Effective AIS Management/Control Programs  Clean Boats, Clean Waters Contact Laura Felda, UWEX/DNRContact Laura Felda, UWEX/DNR  AIS Grants Contact DNR regional lakes/AIS grant coordinatorContact DNR regional lakes/AIS grant coordinator  Purple loosestrife bio-control Contact Brock Woods, DNRContact Brock Woods, DNR  Citizen Monitoring Network Contact Laura Herman, UWEXContact Laura Herman, UWEX  Fish hatchery/bait collector HACCP plans Contact Phil Moy, Sea GrantContact Phil Moy, Sea Grant  Sea lamprey control

26 Resources Available  AIS Handbook for Education Efforts  Clean Boats, Clean Waters Volunteer watercraft inspection programVolunteer watercraft inspection program  AIS Grants  Citizen Lake Monitoring Network  Protect Your Waters National partnership representing water recreation usersNational partnership representing water recreation users

27 Resources Available  Habitattitude National partnership representing pet and aquatic plant industryNational partnership representing pet and aquatic plant industry  See Chella Chow Purple loosestrife biological control manual for educatorsPurple loosestrife biological control manual for educators  Wisconsin Wild Cards Activity Guide  Environmental Education for Kids (EEK!) Alien InvadersAlien Invaders  Aquatic Invasive Species: An Educator’s Information and Materials Guide Sea GrantSea Grant

28 References   Bell, F., and Bonn, M., Economic Sectors at Risk from Invasive Aquatic Weeds at Lake Istokpoga, Florida. Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Online at 20Report% pdf   Deamud, J., Henderson, J., Lennon, M., Mongin, M., and Pastula, D., Economic Impact Survey of Eurasian Watermilfoil Removal from Houghton Lake. Houghton Lake Improvement Board.   Krysel, C., Boyer, E., Parson, C., and Welle, P., Lakeshore Property Values and Water Quality: Evidence from Property Sales in the Mississippi Headwaters Region. Mississippi Headwaters Board and Bemidji State University. Online at  Lovell, S. J. and Stone, S. F The Economic Impacts of Aquatic Invasive Species: A Review of the Literature. National Center for Environmental Economics U.S. EPA, Working Paper # Accessed January 14, 2005, online at  Pimentel, D., Zuniga, R., Morrison, D Update on the environmental and economic costs associated with alien-invasive species in the United States. Ecological Economics 52(3): In Press DRAFT Accessed September 26, 2005 online at

29 References  Pimentel, D., Economic and Ecological Costs Associated with Aquatic Invasive Species, Cornell University. Proceedings of the Aquatic Invaders of the Delaware Estuary Symposium, Malvern, Pennsylvania, May 20, 2003, pp Accessed May 13, 2005 online at  Shaikh, S., The Economic Value of Chicago Beaches. Presented at Lake Michigan: State of the Lake & Great Lakes Beach Association Joint Conference, November 2-3,  Personal communication: John Babinec, WE EnergiesJohn Babinec, WE Energies Lori Flick, Door Real EstateLori Flick, Door Real Estate Terry Hilgenberg, Hilgenberg Coldwell-Banker RealtorsTerry Hilgenberg, Hilgenberg Coldwell-Banker Realtors Phil Moy, Sea GrantPhil Moy, Sea Grant Paul Peeters, DNRPaul Peeters, DNRWebsites: Habitattitude. Accessed on December 5, 2005, at Accessed on December 5, 2005, at Stop Aquatic Hitchikers. Accessed on December 7, 2005, at Aquatic Hitchikers. Accessed on December 7, 2005, at The Economic Impacts of Aquatic Invasive Species:A Review of the Literature, at:

30 Thank You! New Exotic Found in Wisconsin July 2 nd 2006 – Originally introduced by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) to control the Deer population and spread of CWD.


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