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Expository Reading and Writing Course i3 Day 2 Moving from Theory to Practice Date and/or Subtitle.

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Presentation on theme: "Expository Reading and Writing Course i3 Day 2 Moving from Theory to Practice Date and/or Subtitle."— Presentation transcript:

1 Expository Reading and Writing Course i3 Day 2 Moving from Theory to Practice Date and/or Subtitle

2 Expository Reading and Writing Course Preparation Transfer and Engagement: From Theory to Enhanced Practice by Nelson Graff Modifying the ERWC Assignment Template for English Learners at the Expanding and Bridging Levels by Robby Ching and Adele Arellano Formative Assessment for ERWC Professional Learning by Norm Unrau and Jennifer Fletcher

3 Expository Reading and Writing Course Agenda i3 Grant Critical Friends PLCs Clone the Author Teaching Writing Assessing Writing: Protocols for Looking at Student work Handling the Paper Load Reflecting on the ERWC Experience

4 Expository Reading and Writing Course i3 GRANT

5 Expository Reading and Writing Course You have been selected as an i3 study teacher!

6 Expository Reading and Writing Course Responsibilities as an i3 Teacher Complete Fidelity to Implementation Chart. Complete 8 of the 12 modules. Participate in coaching. Participate in PLC/Critical Friend Support Group. Complete teacher surveys: One survey for each class section.

7 Expository Reading and Writing Course Fidelity of Implementation Charts Completed/Modified Reason Time Spent Level of Depth Successes Challenges Formative Assessment

8 Expository Reading and Writing Course Grammar Please note what grammar activities you have completed for: Guided Composition; Reading to Connecting Reading to Writing; and Editing Rhetorically.

9 Expository Reading and Writing Course Coaching A coach has been assigned to each school. The coach will help you form into groups of critical friends to help with the implementation of the curriculum. With the help of your coach, each site will form an implementation group to support each other as the year progresses.

10 Expository Reading and Writing Course PLC/Critical Friend Support Group Each site will have a PLC or a Critical Friend Support Group. Coaches will help you set up your groups. Groups will meet to discuss issues and concerns with implementation and to offer help and advice on: Pacing; Assessments; Fidelity to Implementation; and Assignments.

11 Expository Reading and Writing Course Surveys All ERWC and non-ERWC teachers will be asked to complete teacher surveys. Some students may be asked to complete short surveys on student motivation and engagement.

12 Expository Reading and Writing Course CRITICAL FRIENDS PLC

13 Expository Reading and Writing Course What Are Critical Friends? Professional educators working together: to reflect on current practices; to expand, refine, and build new skills; to share ideas and teach one another; to conduct classroom research; and to solve workplace problems. How to Plan and Implement a Peer Coaching Program Pam Robbins, 1991, ASCD p. 1

14 Expository Reading and Writing Course Why Do We Need Critical Friends? “To improve the instructional practices of teachers in order to increase student learning” (163); To develop teacher potential; and To support teachers. Professional Development: What Works Sally J. Zepeda 2008

15 Expository Reading and Writing Course Why Do We Need Critical Friends? Fidelity of implementation

16 Expository Reading and Writing Course Types of Coaching Collegial coaching Instructional coaching Literacy coaching Mentor coaching Peer coaching Critical friends Professional Development: What Works --Sally J. Zepeda 2008

17 Expository Reading and Writing Course Critical Friends Work together like peer coaches.

18 Expository Reading and Writing Course Two ERWC Coaching Models Critical Friends For colleagues in a building to use together for support, to improve instruction, and to address grant issues. Instructional Coaching For the Advisory Board member or the ERWC Professional Developer to use with individual teachers or a school.

19 Expository Reading and Writing Course Both ERWC Models CLEAR separation of coaching and evaluation. Focus on fidelity of implementation and student learning.

20 Expository Reading and Writing Course Bridging the Gaps What ERWC teachers know and can do… and what we need them to know and be able to do— with FIDELITY!.

21 Expository Reading and Writing Course Critical Friends Help ensure the transfer of newly learned skills from an in-service learning opportunity into practice.

22 Expository Reading and Writing Course Key Relationship Components Collaboration, NOT evaluation Trust Friendly, supportive, and interactive learning environment.

23 Expository Reading and Writing Course Tasks of the Critical Friend Help setting goals. Encourage action.

24 Expository Reading and Writing Course Tasks of the Critical Friend Act as a sounding board. Give feedback.

25 Expository Reading and Writing Course Tasks of the Critical Friend Prompt thinking and problem solving. Question to push thinking.

26 Expository Reading and Writing Course Critical Friends THINKING PARTNERS: we are thinking through and learning together as a team. Less formal than instructional coaching. Teachers should select their own partners. Critical friends can get a divorce (no fault!).

27 Expository Reading and Writing Course Some Characteristics of the Relationship Critical Friends partnerships are voluntary. Information shared within the relationship is strictly confidential. Each participant is responsible to complete any work that both have deemed beneficial.

28 Expository Reading and Writing Course Critical Friends Coaching Model for Classroom Observations (If There Are Any!) “Inviting teacher” steers the coaching process: Observation focus; Form of data collection; Agreed upon guidelines; Discussion parameters; Date and time of observation.

29 Expository Reading and Writing Course Focus on the Practical Effective coaching partnerships focus on the practical, not the abstract. (“It’s About the Questions” p. 76.)

30 Expository Reading and Writing Course Post Conference Critical Friend asks the inviting teacher questions to promote reflection about the lesson. Questions; what happened as expected? What happened differently from expectations? How would the inviting teacher teach this lesson next time?

31 Expository Reading and Writing Course “It’s about the Questions” “A [critical friends] relationship isn’t about providing a quick fix or a recipe for success. Rather the most powerful relationships focus on reflecting, exploring, analyzing, and digging deeper into good practice.” (Ronald R. Bearwald, p. 74)

32 Expository Reading and Writing Course How To Be a Critical Friend https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpfGFKcguV0 As you watch: What is the relationship between the partners? What are your key take-aways?

33 Expository Reading and Writing Course CLONE THE AUTHOR Select one of the handouts you read last night. Briefly look through the article and choose what you believe to be the author’s six main ideas. Write one main idea on each 4x6” card.

34 Expository Reading and Writing Course PAIR AND COMPARE With your partner, condense your ideas into six!

35 Expository Reading and Writing Course PAIRS SHARE Join another pair and reach consensus on the six big ideas of your article!

36 Expository Reading and Writing Course GROUP DEBRIEF What did you gain from the text? How would you use this activity in your classroom?

37 Expository Reading and Writing Course TEACHING WRITING

38 Expository Reading and Writing Course TEACHING WRITING Read the article assigned. “The Five Paragraph Theme Redux” by Elizabeth Rorschach “The Ill Effects of the Five Paragraph Theme” by Kimberly Wesley Compose a Rhetorical Précis of your article. Discuss your article with table group. Share comments.

39 Expository Reading and Writing Course ASSESSING WRITING: PROTOCOLS FOR LOOKING AT STUDENT WORK

40 Expository Reading and Writing Course A Definition of Protocols The customs and regulations dealing with diplomatic formality, precedence, and etiquette. A prescribed procedure for observation and the discussion following the observation. Basically a protocol is a scripted method of doing something.

41 Expository Reading and Writing Course Looking at Student Work Protocols for looking at student work provide teachers with a script that leads them through looking at student work, asking particular questions and noticing particular features, and talking about it in a particular way.

42 Expository Reading and Writing Course The Value of Protocols Safe, non-threatening way to look at—and learn from—student work What do these students know? What do they know how to do? What do they need to learn next? What instruction would best support that learning?

43 Expository Reading and Writing Course From The National School Reform Faculty Available on the Online Community website Focus on looking at student work

44 Expository Reading and Writing Course Looking at Student Work Protocol #1 Looking at ONE student work sample minutes For use by critical friends or an ERWC coach with a small group of teachers.

45 Expository Reading and Writing Course Looking at Student Work Protocol #2 Focuses on looking at a range of work from students in one classroom or in multiple classrooms. Designed to provide insights about a particular student population. Designed to help teachers draw conclusions and generate implications for instruction in general.

46 Expository Reading and Writing Course ASSESSING WRITING HANDLING PAPER LOAD

47 Expository Reading and Writing Course Work Smarter, Not Harder!

48 Expository Reading and Writing Course Some Hints Good student work is easier to assess than poor student work. What can you have students do before work is handed in to improve its quality? What kinds of practices and rehearsals will improve student work before it is handed in? Shared rubrics in department or school All teachers are working on similar items. Shared language.

49 Expository Reading and Writing Course Some Hints Be selective in your responses. Students write several pieces and choose one to be graded. Use portfolio assessment. Plan collaborative writing experiences. Increase the impact of your responses. You comment; they correct. Target your comments and corrections. Students write an advice note to themselves for next essay.

50 Expository Reading and Writing Course Final Hints Use your time wisely. Spend more time responding at beginning of course than at the end. Skim/ read a number of papers before grading any. Stagger due dates. Refer to Rowlands’ “Handling the Paper Load” in the appendices for a more detailed discussion of this topic.

51 Expository Reading and Writing Course REFLECTING ON THE ERWC EXPERIENCE

52 Expository Reading and Writing Course Video As you watch, look for: How application and theory come together in ERWC? How to use theory and research to make intentional instructional decisions?

53 Expository Reading and Writing Course Final Reflection Explain both reading and writing in terms of purpose, audience, and other features of the rhetorical context. Describe inter-relationships between reading and writing tasks (reading as the content, the model, the source, and the inspiration for writing). How do you see this impacting your teaching this year? How has ERWC already impacted your teaching?

54 Expository Reading and Writing Course


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