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D1.HML.CL10.16 D1.HRM.CL9.09 D2.TRM.CL9.21 Slide 1.

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Presentation on theme: "D1.HML.CL10.16 D1.HRM.CL9.09 D2.TRM.CL9.21 Slide 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 D1.HML.CL10.16 D1.HRM.CL9.09 D2.TRM.CL9.21 Slide 1

2 Roster staff This Unit comprises four Elements: 1.Identify the role of rosters 2.Explain the operational aspects of employment instruments 3.Generate staff rosters 4.Update staffing records Slide 2

3 Assessment Assessment for this unit may include:  Oral questions  Written questions  Work projects  Workplace observation of practical skills  Practical exercises  Formal report from employer/supervisor Slide 3

4 Element 1 – Identify the role of rosters Performance Criteria for this Element are:  Explain the functions of rosters  Describe situations to which rosters might apply  Identify personnel responsible for developing staffing rosters  Identify the impact of labour budgets on rosters  Differentiate between roster formats  Identify factors that impact on the selection of staff for rosters Slide 4

5 Explain the functions of rosters A roster is a plan organising staff and indicating:  Names of staff working  Days/dates of work  Work times – perhaps with breaks shown  Work location  Role Slide 5

6 Explain the functions of rosters Rosters:  May also provide information about staff ‘movements’  Help ensure ‘the right people are in the right numbers in the right place at the right time’ Slide 6

7 Explain the functions of rosters Businesses use rosters to:  Organise staff  Balance their mix/use of staff  Communicate with employees  Control labour costs  Help workers  Meet imposed obligations Slide 7

8 Describe situations to which rosters might apply Rosters:  Will be developed to suit individual need  Are commonly prepared for: Departments/sections/specified areas The whole organisation A specific project Slide 8

9 Describe situations to which rosters might apply Department/section-based rosters:  Are common to larger businesses  Very common in hotels  Popular where businesses are open for long hours  Allows better allocation of staff to suit individual departmental need Slide 9

10 Describe situations to which rosters might apply Whole of organisation rosters:  Are less structured  Apply more to smaller operations  Are prepared by business owner/manager rather than supervisors  Apply to businesses open relatively few/er hours or standard hours which remain (more or less) constant Slide 10

11 Describe situations to which rosters might apply Project-based rosters:  Are prepared for special events, occasions, functions or activities  Address work which needs to be undertaken ‘before’, ‘during’ and ‘after’ the event/project Slide 11

12 Describe situations to which rosters might apply Those preparing rosters need:  Authority to act  Knowledge of all employment instruments in use  Good operating knowledge of the business  Good knowledge of staff of the business  Thorough understanding of factors impacting on staffing Slide 12

13 Describe situations to which rosters might apply Rosters may be prepared by:  Business owner  Managers/supervisors  Roster Committee Slide 13

14 Identify the impact of labour budgets on rosters Labour budget:  Is the amount of money available to pay staff  May also be called ‘staff budget’  Covers all classifications/types of employees Slide 14

15 Identify the impact of labour budgets on rosters Labour budget may also cover identified/nominated ‘on costs’ such as:  Training  Uniforms  Leave entitlements  Mandatory/legislated contributions Slide 15

16 Identify the impact of labour budgets on rosters Labour budget prepared by management – may be determined on a:  Lump sum basis  Percentage of sales basis Slide 16

17 Identify the impact of labour budgets on rosters ‘Labour cost percentage’:  Is the percentage of sales/revenue which can be used to pay labor used to generate that income  Calculated using formula: Labour costx100 Sales 1  For example: sales 8550, labour costs 2250 = labour cost percentage of 26.3% Slide 17

18 Identify the impact of labour budgets on rosters Rosters may need to be ‘costed’ which requires for each person listed on the roster:  Identifying their pay rate for every hour they are rostered  Multiplying hours worked by the appropriate rate/hour  Totalling costs for each worker to arrive at total labour cost for the period/roster Slide 18

19 Identify the impact of labour budgets on rosters Costed rosters need to be compared to labour budget:  Over-budget rosters may need to be re-worked  There may be extra funds available for ‘special circumstances’ where costs are ‘too high’  Situations where the percentage is ‘under budget’ may mean money can be carried over to use at a later time as/when needed Slide 19

20 Identify the impact of labour budgets on rosters If labour budget continues to be exceeded this may mean:  Need to apply techniques to control it  Allocation of extra funds  Increasing labour cost percentage  Closing the business Slide 20

21 Identify the impact of labour budgets on rosters Possible ways to control/improve labour cost percentages:  Reduce staff numbers and/or hours  Increase selling prices  Change opening/operating hours  Use online alternatives  Alter service levels, standards and criteria  Undertake advertising/promotion  Examine mix of workers being used Slide 21

22 Differentiate between roster formats Two options for presenting approved rosters:  Paper-based format  Electronic format Slide 22

23 Differentiate between roster formats The paper-based format option:  Produced by hand on paper  A template may be used as the model/basis  Roster is photocopied for distribution  Inexpensive  No special training required Slide 23

24 Differentiate between roster formats Electronic format rosters:  Produced using dedicated software  Requires base data/parameters to be entered  Special training required  Can give fairer and more cost-effective outcome  May save time  Facilitates storage of past rosters Slide 24

25 Differentiate between roster formats Many rosters feature abbreviations – interpretations can vary between businesses who use them:  *** = Not on roster; ADO = Accrued Day Off  LSL = Long Service Leave; AL = Annual Leave  What do the following mean? COM; FO; DR; NA; RDO; Pub Hol; SL; WC; Trg Slide 25

26 Differentiate between roster formats Basic requirements for rosters:  Easy to understand  Provided in print which is easy to read  Made available as required  Not changed with appropriate consultation  Include relevant/necessary information Slide 26

27 Differentiate between roster formats The ‘24-hour clock’ often used on rosters to avoid confusion between AM and PM times:  Midnight = 0000 or  3AM = 0300 or  9.35am = 0935 or  Midday = 1200 or  4:45PM = 1645 or  11.25pm = 2325 or Slide 27

28 Differentiate between roster formats Rotating rosters:  Used where times/staff can be repeated on some sort of rotating basis  Suited to businesses where trade and staffing needs are constant  May be based on early shift, middle shift and late shift basis  May rotate through different jobs/positions Slide 28

29 Identify factors that impact on the selection of staff for rosters Considerations when selecting staff may include:  Experience  Gender  Age  Skills  Languages  Service delivery levels/ability  Leave entitlements  Staff requests Slide 29

30 Summary – Element 1 When identifying the role of rosters:  Understand reasons the business uses staff rosters  Learn information required in a roster  Identify organisational requirements (restrictions and parameters) applying to rosters  Determine labour budget for each roster period and/or how such figure is calculated (Continued) Slide 30

31 Summary – Element 1  Identify different occasions/situations for which rosters need to be prepared  Determine frequency with which rosters must be prepared and the duration of rosters  Identify who prepares/prepared rosters in order to learn from them  Develop comprehensive knowledge of workplace and staff (Continued) Slide 31

32 Summary – Element 1  Find out who needs to view, approve or authorise rosters before they are communicated to staff  Learn or develop solutions to apply to unacceptable/out-of-control labour budgets and rosters  Identify roster format used by the organisation and obtain samples of same (Continued) Slide 32

33 Summary – Element 1  Learn how to interpret and read existing rosters  Learn how to use ‘international time’ to state times of the day  Establish the factors the organisation considers when selecting staff for rosters Slide 33

34 Element 2 – Explain the operational aspects of employment instruments Performance Criteria for this Element are:  Describe the range of employment instruments in use by the industry  Differentiate between staff employment classifications  Distinguish between applicable pay rates  Identify leave entitlements (Continued) Slide 34

35 Element 2 – Explain the operational aspects of employment instruments  Identify meal and break entitlements  Identify allowance entitlements  Describe legislated requirements that apply to staff rosters  Identify requirements that apply to specific work-related incidents and situations Slide 35

36 Describe the range of employment instruments in use by the business Employment instruments:  Document containing entitlements and conditions of employment  Also known as ‘Terms of Employment’  Legally enforceable  Must comply with IR legislation Slide 36

37 Describe the range of employment instruments in use by the business Employment instruments may:  Vary between countries  Differ between industries/industry sectors  Change for individual employees  Alter depending on job position/title Slide 37

38 Describe the range of employment instruments in use by the business Contents of employment instruments can include:  Rates of pay  Classifications of staff  Hours of work (Continued) Slide 38

39 Describe the range of employment instruments in use by the business  Definitions  Leave entitlements  Breaks  Allowances  Redundancy and termination information Slide 39

40 Describe the range of employment instruments in use by the business Example instruments may take the form of:  Awards  Agreements  Contracts Slide 40

41 Describe the range of employment instruments in use by the business Those preparing rosters need to know the employment instruments for staff selected to work on rosters in order to:  Ensure most cost-effective roster  Roster staff according to conditions/terms of employment  Be able to properly cost the roster Slide 41

42 Differentiate between staff employment classifications ‘Time worked’ is key in terms of classifying staff:  Hours worked are often assessed on a weekly/fortnightly basis  Classifications include: Permanent/full-time Part-time Casual  Spread of hours  Requirements that require/trigger payment of penalty rates Slide 42

43 Differentiate between staff employment classifications Considerations relating to classifications include:  Definitions of each classification in relation to hours of work  Specification of how identified hours for each classification may be worked (Continued) Slide 43

44 Differentiate between staff employment classifications Awards and Agreements may also distinguish between ‘categories of staff’:  By name/definition of category  By grade of employee  List of tasks/work each category may perform Slide 44

45 Distinguish between applicable pay rates Payment of the correct wages to staff is important because:  It is a real requirement  It keeps staff happy  It helps retains staff  It ensures labour costs actually reflect hours worked ‘Employment instruments’ are the source documents. Slide 45

46 Distinguish between applicable pay rates Considerations relating to pay rates:  Pay rates based on classification  Applicable penalty rates  Allowances  Grade-related payments  Mandatory contributions Slide 46

47 Distinguish between applicable pay rates Some businesses make a conscious decision to pay staff more wages than they are entitled to under applicable employment instruments – these payments may be called:  Over-Award payments  Above-Award payments  Bonuses Slide 47

48 Distinguish between applicable pay rates Businesses usually offer/make over-Award payments in order to:  Attract staff to work at the organisation or at a certain job  Motivate workers  Reward and recognise staff achievement Slide 48

49 Distinguish between applicable pay rates Where over-Award payments are made:  Staff need to know when they are entitled to them  Staff must be told when they will be paid  Staff must be told how they are calculated  They must be paid without failure every time staff are entitled to them Slide 49

50 Distinguish between applicable pay rates Standard ways to determine what applies in relation to pay rates:  Read relevant employment instruments  Talk to staff with previous rostering experienced  Speak with ‘relevant others’ Slide 50

51 Identify leave entitlements In relation to leave entitlements:  There is an absolute need to read and understand the provisions of each employment instrument relevant to the workplace in relation to: Types of leave provided for Eligibility Amount of leave  Employers may offer additional entitlements at their own discretion Slide 51

52 Identify leave entitlements Annual leave:  Payable to F/T and P/T staff after 12 months  May be X weeks paid leave for every year worked  Loadings and/or pro rata payment may apply  Can be deferred by arrangement/agreement  May be able to be taken as single days instead of a block Slide 52

53 Identify leave entitlements Sick leave:  Available when workers are unable to work due to sickness or injury  X hours/year will be allocated  Employee needs to work minimum hours to be eligible  Unused sick leave is not ‘paid out’ when staff leave the employer  Evidence may be required to support authorisation of payment Slide 53

54 Identify leave entitlements Bereavement leave:  Provided to enable F/T and P/T staff to have paid time to deal with the death of nominated persons such as family members  X hours per family member or per year provided  Evidence may be required to provide proof of the death before payment will be made Slide 54

55 Identify leave entitlements Carer leave:  Not a common type of leave  Provided to enable staff to have unpaid time away from work to look after nominated persons (family) who are ill or require support or care Slide 55

56 Identify leave entitlements ‘Parental leave’ is a generic term for:  Maternity leave  Paternity leave  Adoption leave Slide 56

57 Identify leave entitlements Jury service:  Employers usually required by law to release staff for jury service  Make up pay may have to be paid by employer to supplement money paid by Court to jury members  Proof of attendance may be required Slide 57

58 Identify leave entitlements Study leave:  May be provided by employers to support staff undertaking approved training  May apply only to certain staff and/or courses  May embrace time off and/or cost of training  Payment may only be made on successful completion of the training  Proof of enrolment/attendance may be required Slide 58

59 Identify leave entitlements Leave without pay:  Organisations have the right to grant this as they see fit  Advanced notice usually required and certainly preferred  The reason for the leave is usually required and is often a significant factor in determination of whether or not the leave will be granted Slide 59

60 Identify leave entitlements ‘Continuous service’:  May need to be calculated to determine eligibility for leave/payments  Employment instruments should specify what events do not break continuity  Employer may be required to notify staff in writing where action is deemed to constitute a break in continuous service Slide 60

61 Identify meal and break entitlements Knowledge of breaks is important so as to:  Schedule them on rosters as required  Avoid penalties for failing to schedule breaks as required  Keep staff happy and rested  Comply with regulations and requirements  Demonstrate respect and concern for workers All staff are usually eligible for breaks. Slide 61

62 Identify meal and break entitlements Meal breaks:  Provided so staff can eat a meal  Usually regarded as unpaid time  Eligibility relates to: A minimum number of hours have to have been worked A set amount of time for the break is allocated Slide 62

63 Identify meal and break entitlements Rest breaks:  Provided for rest and recovery  Usually treated as paid time  Criteria apply regarding eligibility, timing and duration Slide 63

64 Identify meal and break entitlements Breaks between shifts:  Usually a requirement for staff to have a given number of hours between shifts  Penalties apply if they do not get this break  The requirement can even apply where staff arrange between themselves to swap shifts Slide 64

65 Identify meal and break entitlements Employer approaches to meal breaks:  They provide no food  They may provide basic food at a basic cost/charge  They may provide food free-of-charge  They may give an allowance Slide 65

66 Identify allowance entitlements Allowances:  Cash payments made to eligible staff  Paid under prescribed situations as identified in employment instruments  Paid as part of regular pay/wages  Proof of eligibility may be required Slide 66

67 Identify allowance entitlements Allowances available may include:  Meal allowance  First-aid allowance  Clothing allowance  Tools and equipment allowance  Travel allowance (Continued) Slide 67

68 Identify allowance entitlements  Disability allowance  Shift allowance  Higher duties allowance  Per diem allowance Slide 68

69 Describe legislated requirements that apply to staff rosters Requirements may be contained in Acts and Regulations within:  IR legislation  Employment legislation  Workplace relations legislation  Labour legislation  Anti-discrimination legislation  Workers’ compensation legislation Slide 69

70 Describe legislated requirements that apply to staff rosters Ways to identify legislated requirements:  Contact relevant government departments/agencies  Visit websites  Obtain support documentation  Speak to relevant others Slide 70

71 Describe legislated requirements that apply to staff rosters Anti-discrimination and EO legislation may provide:  Staff are not to be discriminated against when rosters are developed or training is arranged  The basis on which discrimination is deemed to take place – such as in relation to age, gender, race, disability Slide 71

72 Describe legislated requirements that apply to staff rosters Legislation may also require:  Staff get copy of terms and conditions of employment  Copy of same is available in workplace  Rosters provided in advance  Changes must be negotiated and not imposed  Certain things must be shown on rosters  Employers to check staff hold necessary licences, permits or qualifications as required by their work role Slide 72

73 Describe legislated requirements that apply to staff rosters Workers’ compensation legislation may provide:  All workers are registered under a nominated scheme  Employers pay a premium to cover/insure all workers  Employers administer claims and compensation when a need to do so arises  Employers facilitate return to work of injured workers Slide 73

74 Describe legislated requirements that apply to staff rosters Other IR requirements may relate to:  Appeal mechanisms  Payment of wages  Contributions to schemes  Need to take annual leave  Restrictions relating to annual and long service leave  Requirements for advanced notification of nominated requests Slide 74

75 Identify requirements for specific work-related incidents/situations Important to note:  Legislation and employment instruments govern situations and what applies  Variations require approval  Standard business ethics should apply  Not all will have potential to impact rosters  Different countries and different documents may contain different requirements Slide 75

76 Identify requirements for specific work-related incidents/situations Employee stand down – wages may be able to be deducted where:  Workers go on strike or attend stop-work meeting  Plant/machinery breaks down and affects work  Power is rationed and impacts work  There is lack of fuel  Materials required for work are not delivered  Any cause arises (except ‘slackness of trade’) which employer cannot be held responsible for Slide 76

77 Identify requirements for specific work-related incidents/situations Where stand down provisions exist:  A minimum ‘notice time’ usually apply  Notification normally must occur in a specified manner/way  Staff who are already at work may be entitled to a guaranteed number of hours pay for that day Slide 77

78 Identify requirements for specific work-related incidents/situations ‘Accident pay’:  Employer may be required to lodge claim in support of worker  Payment of nominated wages for a specified period may be required  Make up pay may have to be paid within prescribed parameters Slide 78

79 Identify requirements for specific work-related incidents/situations Injured workers:  Must not be forced back to work  Must be helped back into the workforce by rostering them appropriately – for example: Fewer hours/days Lighter/suitable or different duties Slide 79

80 Identify requirements for specific work-related incidents/situations If terminating F/T or P/T staff requirements may include:  Prescribed notice is given – or payment in lieu of notice  Notice period may depend on: Length of Continuous service Age of employee  Time may be added for job-seeking  Staff are also obliged to give notice of intention to leave Slide 80

81 Identify requirements for specific work-related incidents/situations Redundancy = where business decides a job no longer exists. Possible causes can include:  Changes in business ownership or direction  Economic conditions  Action taken by competitors  Falling profits Slide 81

82 Identify requirements for specific work-related incidents/situations Redundancy provisions usually:  Apply only to F/T and P/T staff  Cover transfer to lower paid duties  Allow pay in lieu of notice  Indicate severance pay applicable and how it is to be calculated Slide 82

83 Identify requirements for specific work-related incidents/situations In relation to severance pay:  It may be calculated on a sliding scale: One year service or less = nil severance pay One to two years service = four week’s pay Five to six years = 10 week’s pay  A maximum normally applies (for example) 10 years service and above = 12 week’s pay  Requirements usually apply to when and how it is paid Slide 83

84 Summary – Element 2 When explaining the operational aspects of employment instruments:  Identify all relevant employment instruments applicable to staff  Read and understand every aspect of all relevant employment instruments  Be able to define and differentiate between classifications for under employment instruments (Continued) Slide 84

85 Summary – Element 2  Develop knowledge of rostering restrictions including liability for payment of penalty rates  Learn and be able to differentiate between categories/grades of staff  Identify and be able to differentiate between pay rate options (including allowances and entitlements) (Continued) Slide 85

86 Summary – Element 2  Identify and be able to differentiate between leave and break types and eligibility and entitlements  Identify legislated requirements and obligations which apply to the development of staff rosters  Learn requirements which apply to specific work- related incidents which have the capacity to impact roster formulation/operation. Slide 86

87 Element 3 – Generate staff rosters Performance Criteria for this Element are:  Prepare staff rosters to comply with identified operational demands  Distribute rosters to staff Slide 87

88 Prepare staff rosters to comply with identified operational demands Critical points:  Allocate ‘adequate’ time to: Become aware of relevant internal issues Draft and revise the roster Cost the roster Liaise with others (Continued) Slide 88

89 Prepare staff rosters to comply with identified operational demands  Avoid distractions  Be sure of the rules: Have copies of relevant employment instruments, legislation and internal policies, criteria, service delivery standards and procedures (Continued) Slide 89

90 Prepare staff rosters to comply with identified operational demands  Gather relevant information: Trade/activity Staff requests and absences  Obtain relevant documents: Previous rosters Job descriptions Rates of pay (Continued) Slide 90

91 Prepare staff rosters to comply with identified operational demands  Consider using technology to assist in the process  Work in a structured manner as appropriate to the department or organisation  Ensure/double-check roster will: Cover all required times Address all required services Meet internal requirements Minimise payment of penalty rates Accommodate ‘special circumstances’ Provide required mix/blend of staff (Continued) Slide 91

92 Prepare staff rosters to comply with identified operational demands  Create the ‘right’/’best’ mix of F/T, P/T and casual staff  Consider alternatives when penalty rates apply: Service rooms later/next day Close department or reduce opening times Reduce staffing/service levels (Continued) Slide 92

93 Prepare staff rosters to comply with identified operational demands  Be alert to savings offered by combining duties  Person developing roster may need to work at times to save labour/money  Consider paying small amounts of overtime rather than employing another person  Stagger times for: Starts Breaks Finishing work Slide 93

94 Prepare staff rosters to comply with identified operational demands Before distributing roster there may be a need to:  Prove roster is within budget  Communicate with other supervisors/ managers  Obtain management approval  File a copy for future reference Slide 94

95 Distribute rosters to staff Communication ways to distribute/communicate rosters:  Post in workplace  Give out copies to individuals  rosters to staff  Discuss at staff meetings/briefings Slide 95

96 Distribute rosters to staff Internal communication/distribution of rosters may be required with:  Managers/supervisors  Owner-manager  Personnel/HR department Slide 96

97 Summary – Element 3 When generating staff rosters:  Allocate time for the process  Draft an original  Cost the draft and revise as required  Liaise and cooperate with relevant others (Continued) Slide 97

98 Summary – Element 3  Comply with internally and externally rules/requirements  Accommodate known upcoming trade levels and staff movements/preferences  Refer to previous rosters and other relevant/supporting documentation  Work in a structured manner to develop rosters (Continued) Slide 98

99 Summary – Element 3  Roster staff to accommodate service levels/criteria and to include opening and closing procedures  Double-check to ensure all requirements have been addressed  Be prepared to stagger starting times, finishing times and breaks (Continued) Slide 99

100 Summary – Element 3  Use a blend of staff as best suits customer and organisational need  Apply acceptable options for addressing rosters which are cost-excessive  Communicate rosters to staff in accordance with internal and legislated requirements Slide 100

101 Element 4 – Update staffing records Performance Criteria for this Element are:  Verify and approve timesheets for payment  Maintain staff records that impact on roster preparation Slide 101

102 Verify and approve timesheets for payment Timesheets:  Form the basis for staff payment  Often need to be checked and approved before payment can be processed  Record/contain necessary detail relevant to individual staff and their work history for the period Slide 102

103 Verify and approve timesheets for payment Where timesheets are used:  They must be completed and signed by each staff member on a daily basis  They must be easily/readily accessible  A clock should be close by  Training must show staff how to complete them  False entries may lead to dismissal  Overtime worked may require management signature Slide 103

104 Verify and approve timesheets for payment Information on timesheets:  Staff name and payroll number  Cost centre  Employment status  Start date with organisation  Hours worked  Dates for the period Slide 104

105 Verify and approve timesheets for payment Person responsible for verifying timesheets will vary depending on:  Size of the business/number of staff  Nature of structure/departmentalisation  Scopes of authority/responsibilities attached to individual management-level roles Slide 105

106 Verify and approve timesheets for payment Responsible persons may be:  Business owner, operator or manager  Division manager  Department/section manager  HR personnel  Person who developed the roster Slide 106

107 Verify and approve timesheets for payment Options to timesheets may be:  Time cards and a time clock  Electronic swipe cards It is a standard requirement staff must only use their own card and must not process/use anyone else’s under any circumstances. Slide 107

108 Verify and approve timesheets for payment Activities in approving timesheets for payment:  Comparing time claimed against roster  Applying personal knowledge of the period and hours worked  Making sure all required details are included  Signing timesheets  Forwarding timesheets for payment  Responding to queries from payroll/HR Slide 108

109 Maintain staff records that impact on roster preparation Security, privacy and confidentiality issues mean records and data:  Must be protected from loss  Need to be protected from unauthorised access/use Slide 109

110 Maintain staff records that impact on roster preparation Needs to update staff records may be imposed by:  Legal compliance requirements  Staff-generated reasons  Internal organisational requirements Slide 110

111 Maintain staff records that impact on roster preparation Information to be maintained may include:  Leave entitlements/updates  Public holidays – taken/not taken  Warnings and disciplinary action  Applications for leave (Continued) Slide 111

112 Maintain staff records that impact on roster preparation  Requests for preferential treatment  Details relating to action taken in regard to Workers’ Compensation – claims, payment, return to work HR/payroll may maintain/keep these records. Slide 112

113 Maintain staff records that impact on roster preparation Considerations regarding staff records/data:  Staff may be allowed to view their own records  Filing options: Paper-based system Electronic Slide 113

114 Summary – Element 4 When updating staff records:  Monitor and verify staff timesheets and time cards  Check overtime claimed has been worked or otherwise approved  Sign timesheets and cards for payment/processing (Continued) Slide 114

115 Summary – Element 4  Confirm revenue centres against which labour costs are to be charged  Follow up and resolve discrepancies and unauthorised claims  Respond to queries by administration in relation payment of wages (Continued) Slide 115

116 Summary – Element 4  Create and maintain staff records/files which influence staffing decisions  Take and keep copies of compliance certification required/held by staff  Ensure privacy and confidentiality of staff records Slide 116


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