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2001 NFHS Football Rules Changes and Points of Emphasis John Hoffmann July 23rd, 2001.

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Presentation on theme: "2001 NFHS Football Rules Changes and Points of Emphasis John Hoffmann July 23rd, 2001."— Presentation transcript:

1 2001 NFHS Football Rules Changes and Points of Emphasis John Hoffmann July 23rd, 2001

2 Football Rules Revisions for the 2001 Season a: Blocking below the waist is restricted to only players who are on the line of scrimmage and in the free blocking zone at the snap : Penalty. There are now two penalties for illegal contact with a scrimmage kicker or holder , : Delete and reword that previously required the automatic declination of certain fouls committed by the opponents of the scoring team : Prior to the game, the referee shall meet with the head coach(es) and captain(s) and explain that everyone is expected to exhibit good sportsmanship throughout the game : The NFHS Football Rules do not recognize protests a: Deleted the panel requirement for footballs g-1-a: Standards for metal tipped cleats changed to conform better with industry h: Jerseys, undershirts or exterior arm covers/pads manufactured to enhance contact with the football are not permitted.

3 Blocking Below the Waist (2-17-2a) Blocking below the waist is now restricted to players who are on the line of scrimmage and in the free-blocking zone at the snap. It is no longer legal for a back to block below the waist. New offensive schemes have evolved that include more offensive backs participating in such blocks, causing an increase in knee injuries. Last year, there was no requirement for the player to be on his line of scrimmage; he only needed to be in the free-blocking zone at the snap. The rule regarding clipping in the free-blocking zone is unchanged. An offensive player who is on his line of scrimmage may legally clip provided all players involved in the contact were in the free-blocking zone at the snap and the contact occurred in the free-blocking zone.

4 Blocking Below the Waist (2-17-2a) An offensive player is on his line of scrimmage when he faces his opponent's goal line with the line of his shoulders about parallel thereto and with his head or foot breaking the plane of an imaginary line drawn parallel to the line of scrimmage through the waist of the snapper. When an offensive player is standing, his foremost body part is used to determine whether he is on the line or is in the backfield. (Rule ) A defensive player is on his line of scrimmage when he is within one yard of his scrimmage line at the snap (Rule ).

5 Blocking Below the Waist (2-17-2a) The free-blocking zone measures eight yards wide by six yards deep centered on the spot of the snap. An offensive or defensive player may legally contact an opponent below the waist provided all players involved in the contact were on their team's line of scrimmage and in the free-blocking zone at the snap. The offensive player must also be stationary (not in motion) at the snap. To be legal, the contact must occur in the free-blocking zone. By definition, a player is in the free-blocking zone if any part of his body is in the free-blocking zone. The free-blocking zone disintegrates and the right to legally block below the waist ends when the ball has left the free-blocking zone.

6 Blocking Below the Waist (2-17-2a) Note: In the following plays, all players are in the free-blocking zone at the snap and the block takes place in the zone unless otherwise stated Play 1: A2 lines up three yards behind the line. After the snap he immediately blocks defensive tackle B4 below the waist in front. Ruling 1: Illegal block. Although A2 was in the free-blocking zone at the snap, he was not on the line. Play 2: As A1 takes the snap and takes a two-step drop to pass, guard A6 takes a step backward and then blocks defensive end B2 below the waist in front. B2 was on his scrimmage line at the snap. Ruling 2: Legal. A6 was on the line at the snap and the block took place in the zone while the ball was still in the zone.

7 Blocking Below the Waist (2-17-2a) Play 3: Immediately after the snap, guard A7 blocks linebacker B8 below the waist in front. At the snap, B8 was two yards behind his line of scrimmage. Ruling 3: Illegal block because B8 was not on the line at the snap. Play 4: Immediately after the snap, guard A7 blocks linebacker B8 below the waist in front. At the snap, B8 was one yard behind his line of scrimmage. Ruling 4: Legal. B8 is considered on the line of scrimmage at the snap.

8 Kicker/Holder Contact (9-4-4) There are now two penalties for illegal contact with a scrimmage kicker or holder. Roughing the kicker or holder remains a 15-yard penalty and an automatic first down. Roughing includes any act that endangers the safety of the kicker or holder. Running into the kicker or holder is a foul that occurs when the kicker or holder is displaced from his kicking or holding position but is not roughed. The penalty is five yards from the previous spot with the down repeated.

9 Kicker/Holder Contact (9-4-4) The rules committee felt the yardage penalty should be commensurate with the severity of the foul and depend on the risk of injury to the player. State associations have been experimenting with this change for several years and have reported positive results. For a 15-yard foul, the personal-foul signal precedes the roughing signal. Although not part of the rule, it is recommended that when in question, the foul is for roughing. It is recommended you distinguish between contact on the kicker's plant leg and his kicking leg. Illegal contact on the plant leg has a higher probability of serious injury than contact on the free or kicking leg.

10 Kicker/Holder Contact (9-4-4) Play 5: Fourth and 20 on team K's 25 yard line. K1 punts. After the kick is in flight and untouched by any team R player, R5 (a) tries to avoid Kl, but brushes his shoulder, causing K1 to stagger to maintain his balance; (b) tries to avoid Kl, but bumps his shoulder, causing Kl to lose his balance and fall; or (c) charges into Kl's chest, knocking him to the ground. The penalty is accepted in each case. Ruling 5a: No foul; that is incidental contact. Ruling 5b: R5 is guilty of a five-yard penalty for running into the kicker. The five-yard penalty is enforced from the previous spot. The result is fourth and 15 from team K's 30 yard line. Ruling 5c: R5 is guilty of a 15-yard personal foul for roughing the kicker. The penalty includes an automatic first down, resulting in first and 10 for team K from its own 40 yard line.

11 Kicker/Holder Contact (9-4-4) Play 6: Fourth and eight on team R's 16 yard line. Placekick holder K2 takes the snap and as Kl kicks an unsuccessful field goal, R4 breaks through the line and dives parallel to the line in an effort to block the kick. R4 (a) hits the ground and slides up against K2, barely making contact; (b) hits the ground and slides into K2, causing K2 to fall; or (c) lands on K2. Ruling 6a: No foul; that is incidental contact. Ruling 6b: R4 is guilty of a five-yard penalty for running into the holder. If accepted, the five-yard penalty is enforced from the previous spot. The result is fourth and three from team R's 11 yard line. Ruling 6c: R4 is guilty of a 15-yard personal foul for roughing the holder. If accepted, the 15-yard penalty is enforced half the distance from the previous spot. The result is first and 10 from team R's eight yard line.

12 Kicker/Holder Contact (9-4-4) Play 7: Fourth and 10 on team K's 40 yard line. Right-footed Kl punts. After the kick is in flight and untouched by any team R player, R9 (a) tries to avoid Kl, but hits his right foot, causing K1 to stagger to maintain his balance; (b) tries to avoid K1, but hits his right foot, causing K1 to lose his balance and fall; or (c) charges into K1's left leg, knocking him to the ground. Ruling 7a: No foul; that is incidental contact. Ruling 7b: R9 is guilty of a five-yard penalty for running into the kicker. If accepted, the five-yard penalty is enforced from the previous spot. The result is fourth and five from team K's 45 yard line. Ruling 7c: R9 is guilty of a 15-yard personal foul for roughing the kicker. If accepted, the 15-yard penalty is enforced from the previous spot. The result is first and 10 from team R's 45 yard line.

13 Penalties During Scoring Plays (8-2-4, ) The automatic declination of a penalty when a touchdown is scored during a down in which a live-ball foul is committed by the opponents of the scoring team has been rescinded. The provision remains for a successful two-point try (Rule ). The rules committee identified several situations in which the automatic declination was not the best choice of penalty options. The situation is now treated like any other penalty and can be accepted or declined unless it is the second part of a double foul. The penalty does not carry over to the try, succeeding kickoff or succeeding spot in overtime. In most cases, declining the penalty will still be the obvious choice. It is recommended that the referee use discretion when talking to the captains about their options.

14 Penalties During Scoring Plays (8-2-4, ) Play 8: Second and 10 on team B's 20 yard line. A3 is illegally in motion and Al's pass is intercepted in the end zone by B7. As B7 begins to run, B2 clips A9 in the end zone. B7 returns the interception for a touchdown. Last Year: There would not be an option for the fouls to offset. Team A's penalty for illegal motion would have been automatically declined since the foul was by the opponent of a team that scored a touchdown. Consequently, team B's penalty would have been enforced, resulting in a safety. Ruling 8: Team B, as the team last in possession, would accept the penalty for team A's illegal motion and the offsetting fouls would result in a replay of the down. The change gives team B the option of accepting or declining team A's foul.

15 Penalties During Scoring Plays (8-2-4, ) Play 9: Third and 10 on team A's five yard line. Late in the fourth quarter, team B trails by nine points. As A7 holds in the end zone, Al's pass is intercepted by B3 and returned for a touchdown. Last Year: Last year, team A's penalty for holding would be automatically declined since the foul was by the opponents of a team scoring a touchdown. Consequently, team B would have to accept the touchdown and then free kick to team A, most likely reducing the time available for the score needed to win. Ruling 9: Team B may accept the penalty for team A s foul, resulting in a safety and two points. The safety reduces team A's lead to seven points and team B will get the ball when team A free kicks from its own 20 yard line.

16 Penalties During Scoring Plays (8-2-4, ) Play 10: First and goal on team B's two yard line. A1 taunts opponents as he runs for a touchdown. During the play, B5 head slaps A4. Last Year: Team B's personal foul would be automatically declined because the foul was by the opponent of a team scoring a touchdown. Thus, team A's unsportsmanlike foul would have been enforced as a dead-ball foul on the try and team A would attempt its try from team B's 18 yard line. Ruling 10: Team A may accept the penalty for team B's personal foul, which would take the ball to team B's one yard line. Enforcement of team A's unsportsmanlike foul will then move the ball back to team B's 16 yard line, where team A again will have first and goal.

17 Penalties During Scoring Plays (8-2-4, ) Play 11: During a try, A1 is roughed on a play during which he throws a touchdown pass. Ruling 11: The penalty is automatically declined and the score stands. There is no carryover enforcement and the rule change in now emphasizes this on successful two point trys.

18 Pre-game Meeting (1-1-5) The referee is required to meet with head coaches and captains before the game and explain that everyone (team members and coaching staff) is expected to exhibit good sportsmanship throughout the game. Sportsmanship can be discussed when the referee and umpire meet with the head coach to verify all his players are legally equipped. The referee may then discuss sportsmanship with the captains during the coin toss. That approach will avoid having to get the coach and captains together before the game and will minimize disruption of pre-game warm-ups.

19 Protests (1-1-11) New Rule “Protests of NFHS Rules are not recognized.” Officiating mistakes are one of the risks inherent in the game. Some state associations are specifically given the prerogative of allowing protests and establishing the procedures. Rule “The referee’s decisions are final in all matters pertaining to the game.” A procedure is already outlined (Rule ) that the coach should follow if he believes a rule has been misapplied. Casebook play 5.1.1B establishes the principle that once the ball is snapped following an error, it's too late to make a correction B. Play: Erroneously, the chains are set before enforcement of a dead-ball foul instead of following enforcement. Up to what point can this be corrected? Ruling: Once the ball is legally snapped, it is too late.

20 Ball Specifications (1-3-1a) Previously a legal ball had to have a cover containing four panels. That requirement has been deleted. The number of panels is a tradition and removing the panel requirement should not make much difference. The marketplace will determine the viability of alternatives. Rule 1-3-1c was re-worded to improve clarity in describing the location of the white/yellow stripes on the football.

21 Removable Cleats (1-5-1g-1-a) Removable cleats must be constructed of a material that does not chip or develop a cutting edge. Legal material includes leather, nylon, certain plastics and rubber. The standards for metal-tipped cleats were changed because industry standards have changed and the committee wanted to conform to the market. The use of aluminum or ceramics is still illegal, but cleats may be tipped with low carbon steel according to the revised technical specifications in the rulebook.

22 Contact Enhancing Materials (1-5-3h) Jerseys, undershirts or exterior arm covers/pads manufactured to enhance contact with the football are now illegal equipment. The change follows in the steps of a 1994 change allowing only NFHS approved gloves to be worn. The glove rule was adopted because gloves were being manufactured with material specifically designed to enhance contact with the football, thus creating an advantage for the offense not intended by rule. New products with tacky surfaces are coming on the market and the committee felt clarification was necessary

23 Football Points of Emphasis for the 2001 Season 1) Game Administration: Halftimes and Ready-For-Play 2) Handling the Repair of Player Equipment 3) Profanity and Sportsmanship 4) Heat and Hydration Issues 5) Spine Injuries: Helmet or Face Mask Removal

24 Game Administration: Halftime and Ready-For-Play The increasing length (8 to 13 minutes) of football contests is a concern. The maximum time for halftime is 20 minutes In Florida, halftime is typically 17 minutes. It is the responsibility of the head coach to have his team on the field for the mandatory three minute warm-up period. This is not part of the scheduled halftime. If teams are not on the field for this warm-up, and ready to play after that period, the appropriate penalties must be assessed. The ready for play signal should have a steady pace, maintained throughout the game. The referee controls the flow, not the teams. Mark it ready and the teams will become ready. Ready for play means that the game and officials are ready for the play clock to begin, not necessarily that the teams are ready to snap the ball.

25 Handling the Repair of Player Equipment If any part of the player’s equipment becomes faulty and the player is of the opinion that repairs can be made within 25 seconds, that player should request an officials time-out. If, in the opinion of the official, the repair can be made without assistance of a team attendant, he should grant a delay in marking the ball ready for play for no more than 25 seconds. If the repair has not been completed after 25 seconds have elapsed, a charged time-out will be assessed to the team. (Rule 3-5-2b) If the team does not have a time-out remaining, that player must be replaced for at least one down. The officials should not assist the player in repairing equipment. If a player or officials knows that equipment cannot be repaired, neither an officials time-out nor the ready for play should be granted. That player should either leave the field or go to his sideline to receive the necessary replacement.

26 Profanity and Sportsmanship Typically, profanity directed at an official or opponent has been consistently enforced (9-8-1c). Profanity toward ones self or teammate has normally been disregarded. Foul language is not acceptable in the classroom and will not be tolerated on the playing field. Coaches should lead by example by refraining from using profanity.

27 Heat and Hydration Drink ounces of water or sports drinks, two to three hours before exercise. During exercise, drink 7-10 ounces of water every minutes. Drink beyond thirst and based on the amount of sweat and urine loss. After exercise, and within two hours, consume ounces per pound of weight loss.

28 Other Points of Emphasis Guidelines are now printed for appropriate care of the spin-injured athlete. Detailed instructions for when to remove the face mask, when to remove the whole helmet, and what other player equipment (shoulder pads) might need to be removed prior to transporting the injured player. REMEMBER: We have no business touching or aiding an injured player.


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