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Basics of Bus Routing 65 th Annual FAPT Summer Symposium June 24, 2013 Punta Gorda, FL. Presented By: Jamie Warrington FL. Dept. of Education Transportation.

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Presentation on theme: "Basics of Bus Routing 65 th Annual FAPT Summer Symposium June 24, 2013 Punta Gorda, FL. Presented By: Jamie Warrington FL. Dept. of Education Transportation."— Presentation transcript:

1 Basics of Bus Routing 65 th Annual FAPT Summer Symposium June 24, 2013 Punta Gorda, FL. Presented By: Jamie Warrington FL. Dept. of Education Transportation 101:

2 Back to Basics Unit 8: Loading and Unloading School Bus Passengers, Florida Basic School Bus Operator Curriculum.

3 Establishing Stop Locations There must be 200 feet of uninterrupted visibility between the front and rear of the bus and other motorists. Stops should be located 200 feet following an intersection or 50 feet from the corner before entering an intersection. Stops must be at least 200 feet apart. It is recommended that there be no more than four stops per mile. Students should have room to wait in safety off the roadway. The safest place for students to wait in safety may be on the side of the roadway opposite the pickup point. Establish or change stops only with supervisor’s permission. VIII-3

4 Bus stops should be located at least 50 feet before entering an intersection and at least 200 feet following an intersection, maintaining 200 feet of uninterrupted visibility between the front and rear of the bus and other motorists. VIII feet 50 feet Stops Near Intersections

5 Length Of Time On Board… 6A Responsibilities of School Districts for Student Transportation. Each school district shall exercise specific powers and responsibilities, as follows: (6) Routes and schedules. (c) To plan routes, so far as practicable, so that no elementary student shall be on a bus more than fifty (50) minutes or secondary school student more than one (1) hour during the morning or evening, and so that no more than an hour and one- half will elapse between the time the student boards the bus and the time school begins, or the time school closes and the student leaves the bus in the afternoon, and to arrange proposed routes which, insofar as possible, are free from major hazards.

6 1.In the AM, route furthest away first, working toward school. 2.In the PM, route closest to school first, working away from school. 3.It may not be fair to the students, but you have to take into account what is the most efficient and economical route for the district.

7 1.Do not place bus stops near Railroad Crossings 2.Do not place new bus stops within 1000 feet of a qualifying Sexual Offender/Predator 3. Avoid bus stops in public parking lots 4.Do not place bus stops near a body of water 5.Avoid establishing bus stops in a location where students can cause damage to private homes/property 6. Avoid bus stops at construction sites (residential/commercial/road) 7.Avoid bus stops on high speed, multi-lane roads if at all possible 8.Avoid bus stop locations near abandoned buildings/residences

8 1.Adequate off street waiting area for the number of expected students 2. Area visible to others (when practical) 3.Road visibility at least 200 feet to the front and rear of the bus 4.Adequate area off street for parent vehicles 5.Lighting preferable for early morning/evening bus stops 6.Area free from hazards and debris 7.If “Bus Huts” are available, use them and stick to it! 8.Plan for minimal encroachment onto private property

9 Maximizing Ridership & Cutting Costs Fill buses close to capacity. Consolidate bus stops. Proactive approach to getting eligible students to ride the bus. More students = more $$$$$. (With Restrictions!!!!!!) Streamline Activity Bus use. Stagger school start times.

10 Contracted Services Use of Public busing for choice or magnet populations. Use of commuter rail services for choice or magnet students. Use of Medical Transport Vans for special needs students. Use of Taxi services. *Should remember that no vehicle is as safe as a school bus for students*

11 Public Busing Ideal for students residing along arterial routes going to a school along an arterial route. Middle and High students. Not recommended for Elementary. Typically costs less than your state re- imbursement per student. Would require some kind of contract. FTA rules prohibit “Student Only” bus routes.

12 Commuter Rails Typically available in highly populated areas. Economical solution for transporting students long distances to/from school. Ability to hold large numbers of students. Could result in increased disciplinary problems. May need to provide supervision. FTA rules prohibit “Student Only” trains.

13 Medical Transport Companies Should be used as a last resort. Can only be used for ESE transportation. Usually not a cost saving measure, however, could help with driver shortage. Ability to provide Curb to Curb service. Ability to pick-up/drop off isolated ESE students.

14 Taxi Services Possible cost saver. Ability to pick-up/drop off McKinny-Vento students. Can be used in both Urban and Rural locations.

15 Things to Remember Cost increases vs. number of buses/personnel. Accessibility to students. Contract requirements. Check with districts that are and have been working with it. Possibility of discipline issues and how to deal with them. Let your operators assist you in planning. They know more than you think.

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