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Preparing to Implement Common Core State Standards June 6, 2011.

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1 Preparing to Implement Common Core State Standards June 6, 2011

2 1 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Time to vote!

3 2 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve The public sector in general – and education in particular – face increasing pressure for results Productivity imperative for the education sector Pressure for enhanced learning outcomes Pressure to prepare students to meet workforce needs Recession and budget cuts: pressure to utilize public funds wisely

4 3 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve The Prime Minster’s Delivery Unit (PMDU) was founded in 2001 to help the British government take on similar challenges Key activities of the PMDU Monitor and report on the delivery of the Prime Minister’s top priorities Identify key barriers that prevent improvements and actions needed to strengthen implementation Strengthen departmental capacity to deliver through better planning and sharing knowledge about best practice Selected targets that the PMDU oversaw Education: ▪ 11-year-old English proficiency ▪ 11-year-old Math proficiency ▪ 14-year-old English proficiency ▪ 14-year-old Math proficiency Health: ▪ Heart disease mortality ▪ Cancer mortality ▪ Max waiting time for non-emergency surgery ▪ Emergency room waiting time ▪ Physician appointments Crime: ▪ Street crime ▪ Burglary ▪ Car crime ▪ Offenses brought to justice Transportation ▪ Road congestion ▪ Train punctuality

5 4 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Within four years, the government was on track to hit over 80% of its high-priority targets Targets on track, percent December December July

6 5 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve The US Education Delivery Institute has distilled the PMDU’s delivery approach to 15 essential elements Develop a foundation for delivery Understand the delivery challenge Plan for delivery A.Evaluate past and present performance B.Understand drivers of performance and relevant activities A.Determine your reform strategy B.Set targets and establish trajectories C.Produce delivery plans A.Establish routines to drive and monitor performance B.Solve problems early and rigorously C.Sustain and continually build momentum Drive delivery A.Define your aspiration B.Review the current state of delivery C.Build the delivery unit D.Establish a “guiding coalition” 2341 Create an irreversible delivery culture 5 A. Build system capacity all the time B. Communicate the delivery message C. Unleash the “alchemy of relationships”

7 6 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve EDI was founded to bring this approach to state systems of K-12 and higher education EDI focuses on supporting states in their implementation efforts to:  Achieve college- and career- readiness for all students  Increase postsecondary access and degree completion  Close equity gaps Higher Education Systems  The California State University System  The Connecticut State University System  The Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education  The Louisiana Board of Regents  The University System of Maryland  The University of Missouri System  The State University of New York  The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education  The Tennessee Board of Regents  The University of Wisconsin System K12 Systems  Delaware  Kentucky  Louisiana  Massachusetts  Tennessee System Partners

8 7 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve EDI has worked with Achieve to adapt the approach for Common Core implementation Organize To Implement Aspiration Internal leadership team TimelineBudgetGap analysis Stakeholder communications Critical Questions Where are we now? What would success look like in ? What are our strategies to achieve success? How will the strategies be implemented through the field to the classroom? How will we connect strategies to expected outcomes? How will be monitor progress and stay on track? Take Action : Implementation Actions Align instructional materials Train educators Transition technology and assessment system Transition accountability and data reporting system Align teacher preparation, evaluation, and licensing Inform student transitions to higher education Covered in workbookAnticipated Desired student outcomes

9 8 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve The Common Core workbook is organized according to the essential elements of this adapted approach  Diagnostic questions to help your team gauge the extent to which you have already addressed the action(s) in question  Brief narratives that provide principles and potential options for putting the relevant action(s) in place  Case stories that illustrate the principles in the narrative  Exercises that will help flesh out your implementation strategy and put the relevant action(s) in place. Each chapter covers one or more essential elements of the approach, and includes… Workbook Table of Contents Completed

10 Reviewing System Capacity and Timelines June 6, 2011

11 10 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Why Do We Need an Implementation Timeline? ▪ In many states, there are more moving pieces than ever before happening concurrently: Coordination is essential ▪ Look across the areas of work and funding to consider how they interact ▪ Faster is not better: What matters most is being thoughtful, realistic, and comprehensive ▪ Implementation will depend on state/district needs and capacity ▪ Detail is important: Year-by-year is not enough ▪ Communicate your timeline publicly: This effort is too large and complex for “whisper down the lane”

12 11 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve What Might a Timeline Include? ▪ Foundational Elements (e.g. establish leadership team, build guiding coalition, develop communications plan) ▪ Align Instructional Materials ▪ Train educators and administrators ▪ Transition assessment system ▪ Transition technology to support assessment and accountability systems ▪ Align teacher preparation, evaluation and licensing programs ▪ Align the transition space between K-12 and postsecondary ▪ Monitor and sustain progress

13 12 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Discussion: Our State Timelines Objective: additions and revisions to your timeline for CCSS implementation Instructions: ▪ Using the template and sample timelines, discuss the following: – Which type of timeline are you following (accelerated or other)? – In light of the sample, how might your timeline need to change? – Which tasks will be state-led, district-led, or a hybrid? – Will you stagger by grade or content area? ▪ If you have not yet created a timeline, use this time to discuss what one would look like for your state  References: Workbook pages 3.10 – 3.16  Time: 15 minutes Template Sample timelines in workbook (most critical in orange)

14 13 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Time to vote!

15 14 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve The workbook contains a rubric that will help you assess your system’s capacity to implement its timeline

16 15 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Exercise: Review your system’s capacity to implement its timeline Objectives: ▪ A self-assessment of your system’s capacity to implement its timeline in five key areas ▪ Based on your self-assessment, selection of a topic to focus on for the rest of the meeting (instructional materials or professional development) Instructions: ▪ Using the rubric in the workbook, make your own judgment about your system’s capacity to implement its timeline ▪ “Vote” on your judgments ▪ Discuss and agree on a judgment for each of the five areas  References: Handouts, workbook pages 2.3 – 2.8  Time: 30 minutes Rubric Self- assessment worksheet Template

17 16 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Time to vote!

18 Constructing a Delivery Chain June 6, 2011

19 18 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve A delivery chain helps you to understand how you can reach the field Definition A delivery chain is the set people or organizations, and the relationships between them, through which a strategy (in our case, instructional materials or professional development) will be implemented. A delivery chain has one question at its core: Starting from the intent of the leaders in your system and ending with the desired change in behavior on the front line (better teaching practice that improves student outcomes), how – and through whom – will your strategy be implemented?

20 19 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve There are a few core principles for drawing a delivery chain ▪ For the strategy you are considering, where does the chain begin and end, and what are the levels between? ▪ At each level, who are all the people or organizations that could conceivably be involved in implementing the strategy? How many of each are there? What role does each play? ▪ What are the most important lines of direct influence from the beginning to the end of the chain? How will they work? ▪ Are there secondary or more indirect relationships that involve others? How important are they? Questions to ask ▪ A mapping of each person or organization and its location relative to others (e.g., state level, LEA level), with an indication of how many of them there are (e.g., 150 superintendents) ▪ Short summary of the role played by each person or organization ▪ Lines between people/organizations that represent relationships of influence ▪ Brief description of each relationship of influence Visual elements to include

21 20 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve As applied to the Common Core, delivery chains will help you to map your strategy for influencing instructional practice State Region/ County DistrictSchoolClassroom Chief Curriculum/ instruction team Website Regional centers Curriculum directors Curriculum committees Manage PrincipalsTeachers Market by 9/2012 Post by 9/2011 Train and distribute by 9/2011 CoachesTeachers Train and distribute by 9/2013 Consult Train and Distribute by 9/ , Train and distribute by 5/2012 Train and distribute by 9/2012 Sample delivery chain: instructional materials What percent of teachers will change their behavior as a result? 10% (small districts) 15% (large districts) 5% (mix) 15% (large districts)

22 21 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Once you have drawn a delivery chain, it is important to identify weaknesses and address them Typical challengesPotential solutions Individual relationships ▪ Weak personal relationships ▪ Low leverage ▪ Identify and replicate stronger relationships of this type ▪ Identify alternate routes to the end of the chain Complexity ▪ Too many actors necessary to get something done ▪ “Rationalize” chain ▪ Identify alternate routes to the end of the chain Funding flows ▪ Mismatch between resource flows and delivery chain ▪ Redesign chain to take advantage of leverage from resource flows Feedback loops ▪ Few or no feedback loops ▪ Create feedback loops ▪ Use feedback loops to exert influence Choke-points ▪ Overreliance on a few key actors ▪ Build capacity/cooperation of key actors ▪ Identify alternate routes to the end of the chain

23 22 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve It is helpful to anchor these weaknesses in specific points on the delivery chain Sample delivery chain with weaknesses identified: instructional materials State Region/ County DistrictSchoolClassroom Chief Curriculum/ instruction team Website Regional centers Curriculum directors Curriculum committees PrincipalsTeachers CoachesTeachers , What are the potential weaknesses? Historically difficult relationship and loose authority structure – curriculum directors not likely to listen to regional centers 1 In smaller districts, principals may not have capacity to train their teachers 2 A large proportion of teachers are not accustomed to using any state website to receive curricular resources 3123

24 23 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Breakout session: Draw and analyze your delivery chain Objectives: ▪ A brief description of your strategy for ensuring that the right instructional materials or PD are available ▪ A map of your delivery chain for ensuring that instructional materials or PD make it to the field and change classroom behavior at scale ▪ An analysis of weaknesses in the chain, and what you plan to do about them Instructions: ▪ Using the handouts as a discussion starter, decide what your state’s ideal strategy is ▪ Map the delivery chain on poster paper and record weaknesses on flipcharts Instructional materials handout PD handout  References: Handouts, workbook page 5.11  Time: 90 minutes Analysis worksheet Delivery chain template Potential weaknesses handout

25 Using the Delivery Chain to Measure Progress June 7, 2011

26 25 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Time to vote!

27 26 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve There are four main types of metrics that you can use to measure progress Alignment User satisfaction Classroom practice Impact on student outcomes Description Extent to which teachers and principals have received instructional materials aligned to the CCSS Extent to which teachers and principals find aligned instructional materials helpful Extent to which teachers receiving aligned instructional materials use them to change what they do in the classroom Extent to which teachers receiving aligned instructional materials achieve better results for their students Sample metrics (instructional materials) ▪ Number of teachers and/or principals who have received aligned instructional materials ▪ Number of teachers and/or principals expressing satisfaction with aligned instructional materials ▪ Self-reporting of changed practice by teachers who have received aligned instructional materials (versus those who have not) ▪ Formative or summative assessment data, comparing teachers who have received aligned instructional materials with those who have not ▪ Observations of practice for a sample of teachers that have and have not received aligned instructional materials

28 27 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve The delivery chain will help you to decide which metrics to focus on Sample delivery chain with metrics identified: instructional materials State Region/ County DistrictSchoolClassroom Chief Curriculum/ instruction team Website Regional centers Curriculum directors Curriculum committees PrincipalsTeachers CoachesTeachers , What are the metrics we will use? Number of districts undergoing training 1 Number of teachers undergoing training 2 Number of teachers who have accessed web portal 3 Number of teachers who 1) are using the new materials and 2) are satisfied with them 4 Number of teachers whose classroom behavior is changing, as reported by principals and educator leaders 5 Difference in gain on formative assessments for teachers using materials vs. not

29 28 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Once you have prioritized your metrics, you need to ensure that collection mechanisms are in place for each Metrics from delivery chain (instructional materials) Potential ways to measure them Number of districts undergoing training 1 ▪ Fold into district monthly reporting Number of teachers undergoing training 2 ▪ Fold into district monthly reporting ▪ Attendance reports from professional associations and universities Number of teachers who have accessed web portal 3 ▪ Website analytics engine Number of teachers who 1) are using the new materials and 2) are satisfied with them 4 ▪ Add relevant questions to existing school climate survey Number of teachers whose classroom behavior is changing, as reported by principals and educator leaders 5 ▪ Extrapolate from sample focus groups of principals, as well as existing principal advisory group Difference in gain on formative assessments for teachers using materials vs. not 6 ▪ Formative assessment data combined with survey self-reporting of adoption in classrooms

30 29 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Tennessee’s school climate survey is a rich source of data that can be tapped for rapid feedback Tennessee Teaching, Empowering, Leading, & Learning (TELL) Survey ▪ Established in 2011 as part of the state’s Race to the Top plan ▪ First statewide survey of principals and educators at this scale ▪ Contains a variety of questions on topics including: – Collaborative instructional planning – School and teacher leadership – Facilities and resources – Professional development ▪ In first administration, over 77% of the state’s educators participated, giving 1,605 out of the 1,745 schools access to anonymous data on their educators’ responses

31 30 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Breakout session: Develop your metrics for feedback Objectives: ▪ Identification of priority metrics that will help you collect feedback on whether your strategy is working ▪ Identification of ways to gather data on these metrics that are feasible in your state Instructions: ▪ Using the handouts and your existing delivery chain as a starting point, identify a balanced set of metrics (across the four types) that cover the “pain points” in the chain ▪ Brainstorm a list of ways to gather data on these metrics that will be feasible  References: Handouts, workbook page 6.12  Time: 65 minutes Template Potential metrics handouts Worksheet

32 Establishing Routines and Monitoring Progress June 7, 2011

33 32 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Routines are crucial to ensuring that you keep your effort on track ▪ Regularly scheduled checkpoints to assess whether your implementation effort is on track ▪ Engine that drives implementation forward: Without routines, implementation will stall or be replaced by more urgent concerns on the agenda ▪ A source of structure and discipline to create order in complex education systems What are routines? ▪ Monitor performance: Understand if system is on track to deliver on its aspirations ▪ Diagnose problems: Surface issues that are inhibiting progress and analyze data from delivery chain to pinpoint causes ▪ Address problems: Provide a venue to discuss and decide how to overcome challenges What purpose do routines serve?

34 33 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve In the Prime Minister’s Delivery Unit, three routines kept things on track DefinitionPurpose Prime Minister Notes (monthly) ▪ Progress briefing for the prime minister ▪ Consists of a brief summary, followed by a short report ▪ Update the prime minister on progress against targets, key actions required, and warning signs of risks ▪ Identify areas where prime minister needs to make decisions or recommendations Stocktakes (quarterly) ▪ Regular meeting of prime minister, leaders from relevant departments, and key officials ▪ Evaluate delivery of specific set of activities ▪ Update the prime minister on progress ▪ Enable prime minister to hold individuals accountable ▪ Provide focus, clarity and a sense of urgency ▪ Make decisions on key actions or new policy needed ▪ Remove barriers to cross-departmental work Delivery reports (semi- annual) ▪ Comprehensive assessment of the status of all of the system’s key priority areas ▪ From delivery leader to prime minister ▪ Update prime minister on comparative progress against all priorities ▪ Outline what success looks like for priorities over the next 6 months ▪ Identify key actions that need to be taken ▪ Act as a reference document against which to chart progress

35 34 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve All routines focused on the recent data and the likelihood that a target would be delivered PMDU Assessment Framework Red Amber/Red Amber/Green Green Highly problematic – requires urgent and decisive action Problematic – requires substantial attention, some aspects need urgent attention Mixed – aspect(s) require substantial attention, some good Good – requires refinement and systematic implementation Recent performance against trajectory and milestones Likelihood of delivery Degree of challenge Quality of planning, implementation and performance management Capacity to drive progress Stage of delivery L/M/H/VH 1/2/ 3/4 Key JudgementRatingRationale Summary

36 35 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Progress on each target was compared in a league table Red Amber/Red Amber/Green Green Key Highly problematic; requires urgent action Problematic; requires action Mixed; some good, some action required Good; requires only refinement Overall judgment Quality of planning, implementation and performance management Capacity to drive progress Degree of challenge Stage of delivery Likelihood of delivery July 2004 APSA 1L GG 3 G G BPSA 2L GAG 2 CPSA 3H AG 3 G DPSA 4H G AG 3 APSA 5VH G AG 2 BPSA 6H AG 3 CPSA 7H AG 2 DPSA 8H AG 3 APSA 9H AG 2 BPSA 10VH AG 2 CPSA 11VH AG 2 DPSA 12H AR AG 3 APSA 13VH AR AG 2 AR BPSA 14VH AG AR 2 CPSA 15VH AG AR 2 DPSA 16VH AR 2 APSA 17VH AR 2 BPSA 18H AG AR 3 R CPSA 19H AG AR 2 R DPSA 20VH AGAR 3 R APSA 21VH RR 2 R = = 7 = = 14 = 16 = Dept Rank (out of 21) Assessment criteria Degree of challenge: L = low H = high M = medium VH = very high

37 36 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve One PARCC state uses a combination of quantitative and qualitative information to make interim assessments of progress Example: Interim data for one strategy in 3 rd Grade Reading Goal Leading indicators for a strategy Qualitative judgments of the likelihood that each of the strategy’s projects will deliver the promised impact on the goal + A quarterly data set that can serve as the evidence base for a performance conversation about the strategy # STRATEGYLEADING INDICATOR Q Ensure Prek-3 teachers statewide receive consistent professional development related to curriculum standards. Teacher retention of teachers <5 years service, grades PK %

38 37 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Massachusetts uses a modified version of this approach in its bimonthly notes on delivery priorities Example: note for college and career readiness goal Immediate actions for the commissioner Likelihood of delivery for each core strategy in current and prior periods, based on most recent data and qualitative assessment Additional detail on the evidence underlying the likelihood of delivery for each core strategy

39 38 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Time to vote!

40 39 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Exercise: Analyze and develop your own routines for monitoring progress Objectives: ▪ Identification of existing routines in your agency that are or could potentially be used to monitor progress for your instructional materials or professional development strategy ▪ Decisions on specific ways in which you can improve existing routines or add new ones if necessary Instructions: ▪ Identify and analyze your existing routines using the template ▪ Evaluate how well they fit together to give an overall picture of performance, and decide whether to add more  References: Handouts, workbook page 11.7  Time: 25 minutes Template Analysis worksheet

41 Charting a Way Forward and Capturing Next Steps June 7, 2011

42 41 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve We have covered a section of the Common Core workbook in detail during this gathering Organize To Implement Aspiration Internal leadership team TimelineBudgetGap analysis Stakeholder communications Critical Questions Where are we now? What would success look like in ? What are our strategies to achieve success? How will the strategies be implemented through the field to the classroom? How will we connect strategies to expected outcomes? How will be monitor progress and stay on track? Take Action : Implementation Actions Align instructional materials Train educators Transition technology and assessment system Transition accountability and data reporting system Align teacher preparation, evaluation, and licensing Inform student transitions to higher education Covered at this institute Desired student outcomes

43 42 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Now we will revisit our capacity review and think through next steps Organize to implement Align instructional materials Train educators Element Rating (1-4) What we have accomplished Next steps ▪ Internal leadership team X ▪ ▪ ▪ Strategies to achieve success X ▪ ▪ ▪ Understanding how the strategies will be implemented through the field to the classroom X ▪ ▪ ▪ Strategies to achieve success X ▪ ▪ ▪ Understanding how the strategies will be implemented through the field to the classroom X ▪ ▪

44 43 ©2011 U.S. Education Delivery Institute and Achieve Exercise: Revisiting the capacity review and capturing next steps Objectives: ▪ Review of progress made and immediate next steps for the areas we have covered ▪ Identified broader next steps for CCSS implementation Instructions: ▪ Using the capacity review ratings for the areas we have covered, reflect on progress in the last two days and immediate next steps in these areas ▪ Discuss the following questions: – Does our timeline for CCSS implementation still feel right? – How well is the state working with and leveraging the work of its leading districts? – What lessons can the state draw from leading systems? – What are the first things we need to focus on when we return home? – What additional or outside support do we need?  Material: N/A  Time: 45 minutes Template

45 Thank You


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