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Next Generation Manufacturing and the Connecticut Technical High School System John Murphy Educational Consultant for the Manufacturing, CADD, and Architectural.

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Presentation on theme: "Next Generation Manufacturing and the Connecticut Technical High School System John Murphy Educational Consultant for the Manufacturing, CADD, and Architectural."— Presentation transcript:

1 Next Generation Manufacturing and the Connecticut Technical High School System John Murphy Educational Consultant for the Manufacturing, CADD, and Architectural Technologies programs October 27, 2008

2 "In order to sustain a strong manufacturing climate, we must continue to develop partnerships with educational institutions and manufacturers to ensure that Connecticut students are graduating with the skills needed to be successful in the future, while providing the manufacturing industry with the robust labor pool it needs to be innovative and thrive in the future.” "In order to sustain a strong manufacturing climate, we must continue to develop partnerships with educational institutions and manufacturers to ensure that Connecticut students are graduating with the skills needed to be successful in the future, while providing the manufacturing industry with the robust labor pool it needs to be innovative and thrive in the future.” --Lauren Weisberg Kaufman, CBIA vice president of education and job training and executive director of the CBIA Education Foundation

3 2007 Survey of Current and Future Manufacturing Jobs in Connecticut “A shortage of skilled workers and concern over the impending retirements of baby boomers are threatening Connecticut 's manufacturing industry, which is vital to the state's overall economic health”. “A shortage of skilled workers and concern over the impending retirements of baby boomers are threatening Connecticut 's manufacturing industry, which is vital to the state's overall economic health”. Connecticut Business and Industry Association Press Release (October 2007)

4 Manufacturers responding to the survey said the top five most difficult positions to fill are: CNC programmers – 56% CNC programmers – 56% CNC machinists – 54% CNC machinists – 54% Tool and die makers – 54% Tool and die makers – 54% Machinists – 39% Machinists – 39% Engineers – 31 % Engineers – 31 %

5 Keeping the curriculum real… Emphasis on more CNC/CAM concepts, principles, and outcomes. (pacing guide) Emphasis on more CNC/CAM concepts, principles, and outcomes. (pacing guide) Part inspection and methods of Quality Control Part inspection and methods of Quality Control Embedded lessons on reading engineering drawings and blueprints. Embedded lessons on reading engineering drawings and blueprints. Integrated math principles and concepts Integrated math principles and concepts

6 National Institute for Metalworking Skills The National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) was formed in 1995 by the metalworking trade associations to develop and maintain globally competitive American workforce. The National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) was formed in 1995 by the metalworking trade associations to develop and maintain globally competitive American workforce. NIMS operates under rigorous and highly disciplined processes as the only developer of American National Standards for the nation’s metalworking industry accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). NIMS operates under rigorous and highly disciplined processes as the only developer of American National Standards for the nation’s metalworking industry accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

7 The NIMS credentialing program requires that the candidate meet both performance and theory requirements. The NIMS credentialing program requires that the candidate meet both performance and theory requirements. Both the performance and knowledge examinations are industry-designed and industry-piloted Both the performance and knowledge examinations are industry-designed and industry-piloted National Institute for Metalworking Skills

8 NIMS credentials Part I Machining Level I – Bench work (no METTEC) Part II Machining Level I – Layout (no METTEC) Part III Machining Level I – Vertical Milling Part IV Machining Level I – Drill Press Part V Machining Level I – Surface Grinding Part VI Machining Level I – Turning - Between Centers Part VII Machining Level I – Turning - Chucking Part VIII Machining Level I – CNC Milling Part IX Machining Level I – CNC Turning

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10 These are Common Formative Performance Assessments based on National Industry Standards… … supported by business and industry.

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12 school year Implement the NIMS skill standards in all 14 CTHSS manufacturing programs Implement the NIMS skill standards in all 14 CTHSS manufacturing programs Begin the process of site accreditation at two schools: Begin the process of site accreditation at two schools:  Oliver Wolcott, Torrington  Platt Tech, Milford Expand the Kaynor NIMS program Expand the Kaynor NIMS program

13 Why implement “NIMS”? Standards based performance assessments Standards based performance assessments On-going formative assessments that measure individual student progress over four years On-going formative assessments that measure individual student progress over four years Students can earn college credit for achieving credentials Students can earn college credit for achieving credentials Earning credentials will provide apprentice hours Earning credentials will provide apprentice hours

14 Why “NIMS”? Increase the rigor of instruction Increase the rigor of instruction Establish a higher level of accountability from the students and teachers Establish a higher level of accountability from the students and teachers Improve the effectiveness of the Trade and Technology Advisory committees Improve the effectiveness of the Trade and Technology Advisory committees Strengthen communication between our schools and business and industry Strengthen communication between our schools and business and industry

15 Minimum Requirements for all Students

16 GRADE 12 All seniors by graduation: All seniors by graduation: Measurement, materials, and safety credential Measurement, materials, and safety credential One other credential as determined by the Department head One other credential as determined by the Department head

17 GRADE 11 All Juniors by graduation ( ): All Juniors by graduation ( ): Measurement, materials, and safety credential Measurement, materials, and safety credential One other credential as determined by the Department head One other credential as determined by the Department head

18 GRADE 10 All sophomores by graduation ( ) will be required to complete 3 credentials: All sophomores by graduation ( ) will be required to complete 3 credentials: Measurement, materials, and safety credential Measurement, materials, and safety credential One milling credential (can also be the CNC milling job) One milling credential (can also be the CNC milling job)OR One turning credential- (Chucking, On centers, or the CNC turning) One turning credential- (Chucking, On centers, or the CNC turning) One other credential as determined by the Department head One other credential as determined by the Department head

19 GRADE 9 All sophomores by graduation ( ) will be required to complete 4 credentials: All sophomores by graduation ( ) will be required to complete 4 credentials: Measurement, materials, and safety credential Measurement, materials, and safety credential One milling credential (can also be the CNC milling job) One milling credential (can also be the CNC milling job) One turning credential- (Chucking, On centers, or the CNC turning) One turning credential- (Chucking, On centers, or the CNC turning) One other credential as determined by the Department head One other credential as determined by the Department head

20 Monitoring Student Progress Graduation Portfolio (See checklist) Graduation Portfolio (See checklist) Trimester Progress Reports Trimester Progress Reports Include strategies in cycle lesson plans Include strategies in cycle lesson plans Embed concepts in trimester assessments Embed concepts in trimester assessments

21 Definitions: Sponsor- The department head and teacher are sponsors for their students. They register students for the on-line assessments. Proctor- Proctors can be any school staff member other than the teacher or department head. Each school should have more than one proctor for online assessments. Proctors should be staff members with flexibility in their schedule necessary to support the on-line assessment. It is recommended that the department head collaborate with the assistant principal to determine the best scenario for that manufacturing program and school. Proctors must be on file with NIMS- AP sends to Murphy? Participant- Participants are anyone (students or teachers) who take the on-line assessments. Teachers can be a sponsor and a participant

22 Plan your work… … work your plan Together the department head and teacher determine the online assessment schedule each year. This schedule should be based on the pacing guide, class, and individual student progress aligned to the curriculum. Together the department head and teacher determine the online assessment schedule each year. This schedule should be based on the pacing guide, class, and individual student progress aligned to the curriculum. It is recommended, whenever possible, to initially administer the online assessment to the entire class. It is recommended, whenever possible, to initially administer the online assessment to the entire class.

23 Other suggestions… Stagger or group the student performance assessments by ability. Stagger or group the student performance assessments by ability. Send all performance parts out at one time for inspection. Send all performance parts out at one time for inspection. Use the TTAC meetings as “inspection night”. Invite members in to inspect parts. Use the TTAC meetings as “inspection night”. Invite members in to inspect parts. Invite other TTAC members on Open House to inspect parts Invite other TTAC members on Open House to inspect parts

24 Other suggestions… Stagger or group the student performance assessments by ability. Stagger or group the student performance assessments by ability. Send all performance parts out at one time for inspection. Send all performance parts out at one time for inspection. Use the TTAC meetings as “inspection night”. Invite members in to inspect parts. Use the TTAC meetings as “inspection night”. Invite members in to inspect parts. Invite other TTAC members on Open House to inspect parts Invite other TTAC members on Open House to inspect parts

25 The next generation… Viable curriculum aligned with current national standards Viable curriculum aligned with current national standards High level of accountability from students and teachers High level of accountability from students and teachers Differentiating instruction to maximize student success Differentiating instruction to maximize student success Incorporating innovative instructional technology Incorporating innovative instructional technology Continually monitor and assess student progress Continually monitor and assess student progress Instituting nationally accredited performance standards Instituting nationally accredited performance standards

26 The results… …the best technical high school students in the United States. in the United States.

27 Thank you! For more information please contact: Thank you! For more information please contact: John Murphy


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