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© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 1 DRAFT Content Delivery System for Personalized Video Networks November.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 1 DRAFT Content Delivery System for Personalized Video Networks November."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 1 DRAFT Content Delivery System for Personalized Video Networks November 9, 2006 Video & Content Networking Business Unit

2 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 2 DRAFT The Need for a Video 2.0-Ready Network Video 1.0  “Browse” based  Fixed and limited content  1-way broadcast  Single device  One size fits all  Predictable usage patterns Video 2.0  “Search” based  Unlimited content  Interactive / On Demand  Multiple devices  Personalized  Rapidly varying usage patterns VIDBLOGS.com Video 2.0 is a Consumer Driven Experience: What They Want. When They Want It. Where They Want It. How They Want It. Traditional SourcesCommunity Sources

3 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 3 DRAFT Servicing the Empowered Consumer  Consumers are increasingly demanding content on their terms – any content, any time, any device, any place  Service providers are evolving into “experience providers” Challenged to provide subscribers with a coherent, integrated media experience across different networks and devices Opportunities for deep user engagement by delivering their “Digital Life” – increased subscriber satisfaction, increased ARPU, reduced churn  Cisco’s Content Delivery System (CDS) is the platform to accelerate these emerging opportunities

4 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 4 DRAFT Cisco Content Delivery System Vision Cisco CDS Arroyo (Cable TV & IPTV) Cisco (Internet Video) Enables any content, any device, any location from a single, open delivery platform. TV PC Mobile Linear On Demand Time Shifted Personalized

5 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 5 DRAFT Design Challenges ChallengeSolution Scale and manage volumes of on-demand content Scalable system that automatically distributes content across network Enable real-time applications (time shifting, ad insertion) and unpredictable usage patterns Converged services: broadcast & on-demand; TV, PC and mobile Meet expectations for broadcast level service availability Operational overhead as network and services scale Unified platform designed for multiple networks, device and content types Real-time data transfers: ingest and commence streaming anywhere in network within 300 ms Network and content resiliency with automated hitless failover Manage as single fault-tolerant system, not device by device

6 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 6 DRAFT The Challenge of Scaling Content Delivery Source: VOD Servers – Equations and Solutions Glen Hardin, Time Warner Cable Paul Sherer, Arroyo Video Solutions  VoD subscriber growth is pushing up stream count  The variety of content available – movies, TV shows, music and educational video, HDTV – is pushing up library storage  As content libraries grow from 1,000’s of hours to 10,000’s of hours …  And as an operator’s geographic footprint grows, necessitating regionalization and local content …  The storage, distribution and accessibility of the content becomes critical for …  Efficient, economic operation and increased customer experience and satisfaction

7 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 7 DRAFT 1 st Generation VoD Architecture Programming  VoD servers installed at distribution hubs Content libraries small (<100 hours) Content library replicated at each hub  ASI direct connect video HUBS

8 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 8 DRAFT 2 nd Generation VoD Architecture Programming  Build a bigger box and centralize at head end in attempt to address scalability issues Physical limitations persist as content library grows and usage increases  “Network enabled” via ASI > GigE connectivity  Requires lots of metro bandwidth as stream count grows  Not optimized for real-time services Time shifting Content personalization HEAD END

9 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 9 DRAFT 3 rd Generation VoD Architecture Cisco Content Delivery System (CDS)  Intelligent, scalable IP video network Virtualized architecture pools and load-balances resources to transcend physical network constraints  Distributed storage/streaming functionality Ingest/storage centralized at head end Personalization and streaming at hubs  Multi-format, multi-device platform for real-time services TV (HD & SD), PC, mobile  Content & network resiliency with hitless failover TV PCMobile Vault Array Streamer Arrays Programming Internet HUBS HEAD END Content Delivery System

10 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 10 DRAFT Product Heritage  Arroyo Video Solutions acquired by Cisco Sept Integrated into new Cisco Video & Content Networking BU Foundation of Cisco Content Delivery System  Drew Major – Founder & Chief Scientist Founder of Novell; designed and wrote Novell Netware Pioneered the “network operating system” 1999 Computer History Hall of Fame inductee as “Father of LAN OS” Architect of Volera CDN  Paul Sherer – Founder & CTO Former 3Com CTO, 30+ patents, editor Ethernet standard Wrote 3Com LAN OS; $ billion LAN product lines Drew Major Cisco Fellow Paul Sherer VCNBU CTO

11 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 11 DRAFT Network Operator Systems, Tools, Processes and Integration Content and Network Security Open Software Systems & Applications Bandwidth Optimization Solutions IP-NGN Quad-Play Network Targeted Advertising Insertion Flexible Content Delivery Cisco Investment Areas CDS Product Fit “Connected Life” Home Networking Voice and Mobility Solutions

12 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 12 DRAFT Cisco Content Delivery System Next Generation Architecture  “The network is the platform” Intelligent distributed architecture Networked Content Delivery Engines work as one virtual system Centralized, shared ingest and reliable content storage (Vaults) Personalization and streaming at the network edge (Streamers)  Technology base Unique caching protocol eliminates need to predict viewer behavior or pre-position content – only 300ms from ingest to play out Resilient design with hitless failover Multi-format, multi-device  Optimized for real-time media services Enables converged live and on demand applications Switched video & time shifting Personalized content & advertising Vault Array Streamer Arrays Programming Internet HEAD END HUB

13 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 13 DRAFT Cisco Content Delivery System Core Benefits  Extreme scalability Add storage and streaming capacity without interrupting service Scales for Startover, nPVR, long tail and user-generated content  Reliability via resiliency Hitless failover delivers broadcast level availability for real-time services (VOD, nPVR)  Ease of operations Centralized library ingest/storage with automated content distribution to edge streamers via intelligent caching Servers grouped into arrays managed as a single system Hitless software upgrades and self-healing network eliminate maintenance emergencies  Service velocity via flexible, future-proof architecture Common platform for VOD and real-time personalized services: Start Over, RS-DVR Multi-format: MPEG-2 & MPEG-4/AVC (SD & HD)

14 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 14 DRAFT Content Delivery System Architecture Content Delivery Engines CDS Framework Content Delivery Applications Operator Services Content Delivery System

15 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 15 DRAFT Content Delivery System Architecture Content Delivery System CDE300CDE400CDE200 Content Delivery Engines CDE100 CDS Framework IngestStorageStreamingSplicingCachingResiliency Content Delivery Applications Operator Services VODPEG Targeted Advertising nVODnPVRBarker Content Delivery Applications VaultTV PlayOutISVCDS MgrTV Streamer VODnPVRTargeted AdvertisingPEG nVOD Barker TV Streamer  Edge caching of content  Personalized video assembly and streaming Vault  Ingest and reliable shared storage CDS Manager  Configuration management and reporting  Manages the network as a single entity TV PlayOut  Multicast streamer  Scheduled and looped play out ISV  Single streamer-vault  Low stream count applications

16 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 16 DRAFT Content Distribution Efficiency via Hierarchical Network Cache Vault Array Stream Array 100% 1-5% Bandwidth Usage “Long Tail”  Different types of storage deployed across the network Minimizes total cost – storage, bandwidth, content management Maximizes performance – unique content caching protocol  Content from any Vault is instantly accessible to any Streamer Streamers cache content based on actual viewer demand to reduce backbone traffic Automatic content distribution – no replication or pre-positioning of content No other architecture economically scales for long tail, nPVR & user-generated content

17 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 17 DRAFT Extreme Scalability  Vault arrays Content and ingest capacity scale linearly with number of Vault CDEs Content added to a Vault is immediately available to all subscribers  Streamer arrays Stream count and cache size scales by adding streamers to an array and adding new arrays to the network  Vault and Streamer array sizes limited only by Ethernet switch backplane capacity  Adding CDEs is non-disruptive Add capacity, locations, applications without taking service off-line

18 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 18 DRAFT Flexible Topology for National / Regional Networks  Tiered Vault arrays enable distributed ingest & storage Large, centrally managed content library serving multiple markets Locally managed regional content (inc. ads)  Cost effective content distribution Fewer points of ingest Reduced bandwidth usage Less management complexity SUPER HEADEND NATIONAL BACKBONE Catcher METRO NETWORK REMOTE HEADEND

19 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 19 DRAFT Non-Stop Availability  Resource pooling and load leveling Storage and streaming resources allocated dynamically across available hardware based on real-time demand Any server within an array can instantly assume the identity and state of another  Auto failover enables “hitless” recovery Hardware outages do not impact service – no more emergencies No interruption of subscriber sessions  Non-disruptive maintenance Replace hardware, upgrade software, add capacity or add applications without taking down service  Applies to any application Catcher

20 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 20 DRAFT Architected for Cost Effectiveness  Software-focused architecture for flexibility and high feature velocity  Low CAPEX Scalable, distributed storage library Fewer head ends Eliminates replication at each streaming node No 1:1 box redundancy  Low OPEX Operational simplicity Virtualization technology - manage multiple servers as one Efficient, automated content management - no pre-positioning required Bandwidth usage typically 95%+ less than other solutions Auto failover eliminates service emergencies In-service maintenance and upgrades

21 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 21 DRAFT CDS Manager  Unified browser-based administrative console for all CDEs network-wide Configuration Status monitoring Troubleshooting & maintenance Reporting  Assign Vault and Streamer CDEs to arrays Major parameters configured once and automatically propagated across the network  Extensive reporting capabilities Stream history Bandwidth usage Content activity & popularity Audit logs

22 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 22 DRAFT Ecosystem Flexibility  Back Offices/Middleware Tandberg OpenStream C-COR nABLE Siemens Myrio NGOD  Head Ends SA Motorola DVB-C  Session Control ISA Corba RTSP SSP  RT Control LCSP RTSP Corba  Asset Ingest FTP MPEG SPTS AnyIn/SambaFS Tape/DVD/CD

23 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 23 DRAFT CDE Specifications CDE 100CDE 200CDE 300CDE 400 Rack Units 1234 Network Interfaces 2 x 1000Base-T6 x 1000 Base-T or 4 x 1000BaseSX + 2 x 1000Base-T 14 x 1000Base-T or 8 x 1000 Base-SX + 2 x 1000Base-T 6 x 1000Base-T or 4 x 1000Base- SX + 2 x 1000 Base-T Storage 290G SCSI6 TB SATA1 TB SCSI12 TB SATA Max. Streams N/A; not used as Streamer N/A; not used as Streamer Max. Ingest Hours N/A; not used as Vault 3000 hours SD; 750 hours HD N/A; not used as Vault 6000 hours SD; 1500 hours HD Max. Ingest Channels N/A; not used as Vault 200 SD or 50 HDN/A; not used as Vault 200 SD or 50 HD

24 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 24 DRAFT CDA Application Mapping to CDEs CDE 100CDE 200CDE 300CDE 400 Vault TV Streamer TV PlayOut Integrated Streamer- Vault CDS Manager

25 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 25 DRAFT Cisco CDS Competition Competitive Differentiation Network-Based SolutionBox-Based Offering SOLUTION Optimized SATA, SCSI, and RAM Efficient Content Distribution RAM & Disk Storage Requires Content Duplication STREAM STORAGE Array-Based Scaling Easily Expanded Box Duplication/Configuration Complex Procedures SCALING Flexible Moves, Adds, Changes Auto-Fault Management Complex Moves, Adds, Changes Immediate Attention on all Failures EASE OF OPERATIONS Centralized solution requires significant IP transport costs Efficient Transport >95% streams serviced from streamer BANDWIDTH EFFICIENCY Commodity-Based HW Proprietary Hardware HARDWARE No Single Points of Failure Arrays provide resiliency HIGH AVAILABILITY Multiple Single Pts of Failure Resiliency Requires Redundant Components Trick files Created Upon Ingest Available to 100% of Users High Video Quality Created on the fly via ASIC Performance Constrained Low Video Quality TRICK MODE CAPABILITIES

26 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 26 DRAFT Deploying an End-to-End Cable Video Network Regional Network Hub Residential 4500 or 7600 Series uBR CMTS Business Backbone Network 6500 Series CRS-1 Router SA STB or DVR ISR Router Linksys Home Router SDV Server CDS TV Streamer 4500 or 7600 Series ISR Router CRS-1 Router Primary Video Headend Digital Content Manager Digital Headend SA Encoders CDS Vault CDS Manager Secondary Video Headend Digital Content Manager Digital Headend SA Encoders CDS Vault SA QAM HFCHFC CRS-1 Router CRS-1 Router

27 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 27 DRAFT Deploying an End-to-End Wireline Video Network Regional Network VSO Residential 4500 or 7600 Series DSLAM Business Backbone Network 6500 Series CRS-1 Router SA STB or DVR ISR Router Linksys Home Router CDS TV Streamer 4500 or 7600 Series ISR Router CRS-1 Router Primary VHO Digital Content Manager SA Encoders CDS Vault CDS Manager Secondary VHO Digital Content Manager SA Encoders CDS Vault CRS-1 Router CRS-1 Router SHESHE

28 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 28 DRAFT Example: CDS-Enabled VoD at TWC Portland  Content Delivery System  Cisco 7600 series routers  ONS ONS MSTP  MQAM / GQAM  DNCS Cisco Products  Centralized deployment can seamlessly migrate to distributed with increased take rate  Future-proof solution supports VoD today, other TWC applications in future Benefits Portland Headend Catcher BMSDNCS CDS Vault CDS Streamer CDS Streamer CDS Mgr MQAM / GQAM Saco CDS Vault CDS Streamer MQAM / GQAM Cumberland South PortlandScarborough Wells 7600

29 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 29 DRAFT Cisco Customer Advocacy + SciCare System & Network Expertise for Video Coordinated Planning and Strategy Make Sound Financial and Strategic Decisions Prepare Assess Service Readiness Analyze, then Recommend Solution Plan Maintain Network Health Manage, Resolve, Repair, Replace Operate Implement the Solution Integrate Without Disruption or Causing Vulnerability Implement Design the Solution Products, Services, Support Aligned to Requirements Design Operational Excellence Assure Quality of service Optimize Cisco Lifecycle Services Accelerating Customer Success for Service Provider Deployments

30 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 30 DRAFT Cisco Content Delivery System Summary  Architected for fast, reliable real-time content delivery Any Content – Video, music, games Any Device – Streaming to TVs, PCs and mobile devices Any Location – Via cable, telco and mobile networks  Personalized content – VoD, nPVR, time shifting, targeted advertising  Unified distribution path for all services  Extraordinary scalability and availability Limitless capacity for ingest, storage, streaming Bandwidth optimization Load leveling and network resiliency for “hitless” failover “In service” maintenance/upgrades  Future proof for the personalized applications on the horizon  Open standards ease integration of end-to-end solutions

31 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 31 DRAFT


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