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Objectives Define branding Understand the purpose of branding Become familiar with the branding process Understand the purpose of visual identity Learn.

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Presentation on theme: "Objectives Define branding Understand the purpose of branding Become familiar with the branding process Understand the purpose of visual identity Learn."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Objectives Define branding Understand the purpose of branding Become familiar with the branding process Understand the purpose of visual identity Learn about the visual identity design process Comprehend the purpose of a logo Begin learning to design a logo Recognize the various logo forms and formats Become acquainted with letterhead design Learn about designing a business card

3 Definitions A brand is the sum total of all characteristics and assets that differentiates a product, service, or group from the competition plus the perception of the brand by the public. Branding encompasses the entire development process of creating a brand, brand name, and visual identity, among other print, digital, and brand environment formats An integrated branding program is the creation of a comprehensive, strategic, unified, and transmedia program for a brand. Brand strategy is the core tactical underpinning of branding, uniting all planning for every visual and verbal brand expression. A logo is a unique identifying symbol that represents and embodies everything a brand or company signifies.

4 What is Branding? Whether people like it or loathe it, almost every product, service, major city, business, and organization has been branded. Many think of a brand as a proprietary name for a product, service, or group.  On a more multifaceted level, a brand is the sum total of all characteristics and assets of a brand name product, service, or group that differentiates it from the competition, as well as the perception of the brand by the public.  Branding encompasses the entire development process of creating a brand, brand name, and visual identity, among other print, digital, and brand environment formats.  An integrated branding program is the creation of a comprehensive, strategic, unified, and transmedia program for a brand.

5 The Purpose of Branding In an overcrowded, competitive marketplace, relevant and engaging branding can ensure efficacy for a quality product, service, group, individual, or commodity. Not only does branding distinguish, it builds equity, the value of the brand or group. (RED): Branding © Wolff Olins, New York

6 Differentiation Few products, services, commodities, or groups offer unique benefits and depend upon branding to differentiate them in the minds of the public in a glutted and highly competitive market.  Two main verbal differentiators are the brand name, a proprietary name, and the tagline, a slogan or short distinctive phrase. The main visual identifier is the logo. Each brand has functional benefits, meaning practical advantages, uses, or capabilities, which may or may not be unique to its product or service category. Each brand also has intangible assets—emotional benefits— due to its heritage, parent company, logo and visual identity, package design, environmental design, advertising, endorsements, and other formulated or evolved associations.

7 Branding Process The design process for branding is  Orientation > Analysis > Concepts > Design > Implementation The branding process is strategic; it requires collaboration among marketing, creative, and technology professionals. After what can be extensive research during orientation, strategy is the next crucial step during the analysis phase.

8 Branding Process: Strategy Brand strategy is the core tactical underpinning of branding, uniting all planning for every visual and verbal brand expression.  The brand strategy defines the brand’s personality and promise, differentiates the brand from the competition by defining the brand’s positioning, and codifies the brand essence.  It is a conceptual plan providing guidelines—for both client management and creative professionals—to drive all brand design solutions. öola: Identity © Pentagram, New York

9 Branding Process: Conception Every brand or group should possess a core value or quality that can become its construct, a quality or position a brand “owns” against the composition. Owning a quality, even though others in your category have the same quality, establishes a brand in the audience’s mind as the primary possessor of that quality; it is positioning of the brand in the public’s mind against the competition. The tactic is to claim ownership of a benefit or quality before anyone else does, to preempt the competition, and to express that construct through the visual and verbal identity. Several factors must be considered when formulating a brand construct or positioning:  Differentiation  Ownership  Consistency  Relevance

10 Brand Process: Naming A brand name is the verbal identity—a proprietary name—and coupled with a tagline or descriptor, it becomes the verbal signature. Naming a brand involves many crucial considerations.  What does the name mean?  What type of spirit or personality should it convey?  How will people react to it?  What does the name mean in a specific language across cultures? There are several categories of name types that are more or less appropriate for any brand, including the following:  Founder’s name, explanatory, expressive or invented, allegorical or symbolic, and acronym

11 Visual Identity Design The basic purpose of visual identity is the same as a branding program—to identify, differentiate, and build a sustainable presence and position in the marketplace as well as to engender trust in the brand or group. A visual identity is the visual and verbal articulation of a brand or group, including all pertinent design formats, such as the logo, letterhead, business card, and website, among others.  The keystone of any visual identity is a logo, a unique identifying symbol. A visual identity should be:  Identifiable  Memorable  Distinctive  Sustainable  Flexible/extendible

12 Designing Visual Identity Depending on the visual identity project, there may be preliminary steps including market research, a brand audit (assessment), competitive audit, setting or clarifying existing strategy, and naming or renaming. After orientation and analysis, conceptual design begins, which is based on the strategy set forth in the design brief. Conception  The visual identity design concept is conceived based on a brand’s or group’s core value, communication goals, and positioning in the marketplace. Creating Coherence Across a Visual Identity or Branding Program  A program of strategic and integrated solutions for a brand or group results in harmonious brand experiences for its audience.  A brand experience is an individual audience member’s experience as he or she interacts with a brand—at every touchpoint.

13 What is a Logo? A logo is the single graphic design solution that will be a part of every other brand design solution. It is the signifier. It is the identifier. A logo is a unique identifying symbol.  Stemming from the word logotype, logo is the most commonly accepted term; other terms are symbol, mark, brand mark, identifier, or trademark.  With one glance, the average person should be able to recognize and assess a brand or group by looking at its logo. Unilever: Logo © Wolff Olins, New York

14 Logo Categories A logo can take various forms and combinations; it can be a wordmark, lettermark, symbol mark, combination mark, or emblem. Some categories of logos include the following:  Logotype (also called wordmark)  Lettermark Sunpark: Logo (Logotype) © George Tscherny, Inc., New York Tihany Design: Logo (Lettermark) © Mirko Ilić Corp., New York

15 Logo Categories Some categories of logos include the following:  Symbol  Pictorial symbol The Orphan Society of America: Logo (Pictorial Symbol) © Mirko Ilić Corp., New York Perks: Logo (Pictorial Symbol) © Regina Rubino / IMAGE : Global Vision Santa Monica, CA and Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai, China.

16 Logo Categories Some categories of logos include the following:  Abstract symbol  Nonrepresentational or Nonobjective symbol Khawachen, Pioneers of Tibetan Rugs: Logo (Abstract Symbol) © Harp and Company Graphic Design, Hanover, NH Cartografica: Logo (Nonobjective Symbol) © Pep Carrió, Madrid

17 Logo Categories Some categories of logos include the following:  Character Icons Women in War Jobs — Rosie the Riveter (1942–1945): Logo (Character Icon) Office of War Information, War Manpower Commission (Sponsors) J. Walter Thompson (Volunteer Agency) Miss Chiquita Worldwide Personality: Logo (Character Icon) © SamataMason, West Dundee, IL

18 Logo Categories Some categories of logos include the following:  Emblem MR: Logo (Emblem) © Ideograma, Mexico Vix Restaurant: Logo (Emblem) © Mirko Ilić Corp., New York

19 Designing a Logo Conception For branding, visual identity, and logo development, some clients provide a brand brief, or the information is incorporated into a design brief or creative brief, forming one document. Generating design concepts for a logo depends on compressing meaning into one small unit, a unit that will have to function, endure for years, if not decades, and be integral to every visual communication for that entity. VisionSpring: Logo (and Runners-Up) © UnderConsideration LLC, Austin, TX

20 Designing a Logo Visual Brief Collage Board A visual brief collage board is one way of determining strategy and a construct; it is also called a visual positioning collage.  Using a visual brief collage board is a great starting point for visualization, in particular for logo design, since a collage board should encompass the general look, mood, personality, colors, imagery, and perhaps typefaces.  A visual brief collage replaces a written design brief or brand brief, which is used to determine strategy before concept generation.

21 Designing a Logo Points of Departure After going through the steps of orientation and analysis, understand the communication goals. There are several different starting points:  The Brand Name: Invented, symbolic names, or others point to intuitive solutions One Laptop Per Child: Logo © Pentagram, New York

22 Designing a Logo Points of Departure  Core Values and Attributes: The defined principles that guide an entity’s conduct Moomah: Identity © Apartment One, Brooklyn

23 Designing a Logo Points of Departure  Brand Essence and Story: Entity’s fundamental characteristics or story expressed concisely in a core concept. Oregon College of Art and Craft: Branding Initiative © Ziba Marketing, Portland, OR

24 Designing a Logo Points of Departure  Symbolic Meaning: A logo can be based on a symbol or attribute symbolic meaning to an object or form. Holocaust Remembrance Project/Before and After: Logo © Jeff Fisher, LogoMotives, Portland, OR

25 Logo Format: Compositional Unit As a compositional unit, a logo must be independent, able to stand on its own.  It is incorporated into many other solutions, including print, on screen, and so on.  Some formats include self-contained unit, breaking the unit, and free-form. Mermaid Inn: Logo (Self-contained) © Louise Fili, Ltd., New York Byader: Logo (Free-form) © Brandcentral Interaccess: Logo (Breaking the Unit) © Underline Studio

26 Visualization The characteristics of all shapes, forms, typefaces, colors, images, and symbols of a logo contribute to its denotative and connotative meaning. There are fundamental ways of depicting shapes or forms.  Elemental form: line or flat tone used to reduce an image or subject to stark simplicity, similar to a pictograph.  Linear: line used as the main element to depict or describe the shape or form.  High contrast: depiction of forms based on extreme contrast of light and shadow falling on a three-dimensional form  Volumetric: light and shadow, gradation, or modeling used to suggest the illusion of three-dimensional form.  Texture or pattern: line or marks used to suggest form, light, texture, pattern, or tone using hatch, cross-hatch, cross contour, dots, smudges, etc.

27 Color Many brands are synonymous with the color or color palette of their visual identities. Color contributes to distinction and influences people’s brand perception. People are greatly affected by color. Cultural and psychological color associations influence them.  Choose color or color palette for distinction and differentiation from the competition.  Choose color wisely for meaning, connotations, and symbolism across cultures.  Use color to build meaning.  Use color variations in logos for the same company or brand to represent different operating units or brand extensions.  Ensure color consistency across media.

28 Type A typeface for a logo should be chosen for its form, appropriateness, and expressive potential. Keep in mind these considerations for logo and identity design:  Legibility  Connotation: appropriateness, voice, and expression  Uniqueness and distinction  Differentiation from competition  Select a typeface family for range, flexibility of use, weights, widths, including numerals and bullets  Works in a range of sizes and across all formats and media  Web fonts are built around web standards, tailored specifically for websites  Works well in black and white and color  Choose a typeface for the text of the correspondence on stationery to complement the logo, not replicate it

29 The Letterhead The letterhead is a business tool used for many formal or legal purposes. The letterhead printed on a sheet of fine paper or viewed as a digital page includes specific content and is a core visual identity component, part of a broader visual identity system.  The design of the letterhead should be consistent with other components of the visual identity Columbus Band and Trust Co.: Stationery © Topos Graphics, Brooklyn

30 The Letterhead Fundamentals of Letterhead Design Every decision counts, from the typography to the positioning of the contact information. Function and coherent identity elements are imperatives.  Functional considerations include size, legibility when faxed, how it folds, ability to take ink well, a secondary sheet (with less content), and template guidelines. Composition Very often, the pertinent information resides at the head (or top) of the page; others break with tradition and position type, graphics, or illustrations in any number of ways  Some designers feel it is perfectly acceptable to have slight to moderate variations in color, type, or arrangements among the letterhead, envelopes, and business cards.

31 The Business Card A business card is, perhaps, the most intimate design format. Often passed from hand to hand, a business card quickly and directly tells its reader who you are, what you do, with whom you are affiliated, and how to contact you. Identity Standards for Business Cards For both general and executive business cards, the standard content guidelines usually include:  Individual’s name, job title, organizational corporate unit or department name, address or office location, phone and fax numbers, E-mail address(es), and web address  To include more information or graphics, some design a two- sided card, utilizing the reverse side. Lluvia de Ideas: Business Card © Ideograma, Mexico

32 Summary Branding encompasses the entire development process of creating a brand, brand name, and visual identity, among other print, digital, and brand environment formats. Branding can ensure efficacy for a quality product, service, group, individual, or commodity. Brand strategy is the core tactical underpinning of branding, uniting all planning for every visual and verbal brand expression. Every brand or group should possess a core value or quality that can become its construct, a quality or position a brand “owns” against the composition. Products, services, commodities, groups, and individuals depend upon branding to differentiate them in the minds of the public in a glutted and highly competitive market.

33 Summary The basic purpose of visual identity is the same as a branding program—to identify, differentiate, and build a sustainable presence and position in the marketplace as well as to engender trust in the brand or group. Logos can take the form of a wordmark, lettermark, symbol mark, combination mark, an emblem, or an icon. As with any design project, the standard process is Orientation > Analysis > Conceptual Design > Design Development > Implementation A logo tells a focused visual story—meaning is distilled and then compressed into a unit.

34 Summary As a compositional unit, a logo must be independent, able to stand on its own. The characteristics of all shapes, forms, typefaces, colors, images, and symbols of a logo contribute to its denotative and connotative meaning. A letterhead is a formal business tool and a major application in visual identity. A business card is a printed or digital surface—a small rectangle—on which a person’s name, business affiliation, and contact information are printed; the business card, a very portable marketing tool, is an integral part of a broader visual identity system.


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