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OVERCOMING CHALLENGES IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT NAWIC May 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "OVERCOMING CHALLENGES IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT NAWIC May 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 OVERCOMING CHALLENGES IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT NAWIC May 2013

2 Maureen Connolly, an educational researcher in the area of emergency and crisis management. College administrator for 15+ years. FEMA disaster reservist. Publications: Aligning institutions of higher education emergency preparedness plans with the National Response Framework. Journal of Emergency Management, 10, (4), Is your college really ready for a crisis? Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 36 (5), Creating a college based community emergency response team (CERT). Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 36 (6),

3 OVERCOMING CHALLENGES IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT  Creating an Effective Emergency Preparedness Plan  The Emergency Preparedness Team  ICS (Incident Command Structure)  Hazard Analysis  COOP  Training

4 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Preparing for and reacting to natural hazards and man-made emergency events that could compromise the safety of anyone in your on-site and/or off-site facilities, as well as jeopardize the continuation of operation of your business.

5 GUIDELINES National Fire Protection Association 1600 American National Standard Adopted by U.S. Department of Homeland Security

6 BUSINESSES SHOULD HAVE AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN Up to 40% of businesses affected by a natural or human-caused disaster never reopen. (Source: Insurance Information Institute) Two-thirds (62%) of respondents said they do not have an emergency plan in place for their business. (Source: Ad Council survey )

7 WHY DO I NEED A PLAN? Regulations To help manage your risk. Insurance does not cover all risks Protect the safety of employees, visitors, contractors and others at risk from hazards at the facility Maintain customer service by minimizing interruptions or disruptions of business operations Protect facilities, physical assets and electronic information Prevent environmental contamination Protect the organization’s brand, image and reputation

8 HAZARDS Natural Snowstorms Violent thunderstorm Tornado Earthquake Flash floods Wild fires Coyotes, fox, deer Man-Made Sensitive Information loss Bomb threats Food poisoning/allergic reactions Pandemic Acts of violence Loss of electricity Accidents Death Terrorism Toxic spills nearby

9 HAVE PLANS IN PLACE: BIOLOGICAL, CHEMICAL, NUCLEAR ATTACK, FIRE, FLOOD, HURRICANE, TORNADO, PANDEMIC, ACTIVE SHOOTER, PERSON OF CONCERN. Three Most Important: 1. Communication 2. Evacuate 3. Shelter-in-Place

10 COOP Essential business functions and staff have been identified. Procedures have been established with suppliers, vendors, and other businesses or organizations critical to daily operations. Financial and administrative procedures required to perform essential business functions have been established. A plan is in place for conducting business if the facility is not accessible, and back-up systems for vital business records have been created.

11 PROVIDE TRAINING FOR ALL PERSONNEL THAT FOCUSES ON PROTOCOLS AND PROCEDURES OF THE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLAN. How and where to access safety equipment And emergency supplies First aid kits Automated External Defibrillators (AED) Fire Extinguishers Blood borne pathogens Evacuation Shelter in place The midst of a crisis is not the time to start figuring out who ought to do what. At that moment, everyone – from top to bottom – should know the drill and know each other.

12 EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS TRAINING SHOULD BE OFFERED AT LEAST ANNUALLY Drills Tabletop Exercises Shelter in Place Evacuation Communications COOP Activation Medical Emergency After Action Plans

13 CREATE A PLACE WHERE EVERYONE ASSUMES RESPONSIBILITY OR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Each and every member needs to know what is expected of them and the roles and responsibilities of each member of the community. Employees need a clear understanding of what is expected of them (Clement, 2002; Kovoor-Misra, 1995; Zdziarski 2007.) Employees who have received sufficient training, been exposed to comprehensive simulations and drills, and who have participated in the testing and fine-tuning of crisis plans will not only be vigilant in watching for early warning signs, they will likely be effective and efficient in executing the developed strategies and increasing the likelihood of a successful crisis outcome. (Hough and Spillan, 2005)

14 For further information contact Maureen Connolly, Ed.D at


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