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SCOOPS Supporting student leaders, fostering collaboration, enhancing events, preventing burn-out Michelle Tang Sustainability Intern, Santa Clara University.

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Presentation on theme: "SCOOPS Supporting student leaders, fostering collaboration, enhancing events, preventing burn-out Michelle Tang Sustainability Intern, Santa Clara University."— Presentation transcript:

1 SCOOPS Supporting student leaders, fostering collaboration, enhancing events, preventing burn-out Michelle Tang Sustainability Intern, Santa Clara University

2 about me Michelle Tang Senior, Environmental Science major Student Initiatives Intern, Office of Sustainability Santa Clara University Eco-Fashion and Art Show, Swap for Good Clothing Exchange, SCOOPS, other events and programs serving students at Santa Clara University.

3 office of sustainability Develop a culture of sustainability among students and student groups

4 ROAD MAP Introduction to SCOOPS and who “SCOOPers” are/can be Using “Principles of Influence” to create a successful support and leadership development program for sustainability-related clubs and organizations Sharing/building “Exemplary Traits of Leaders” for student leaders, by student leaders

5 the acronym students collaborating and organizing opportunities and projects for sustainability

6 (monthly) scoops Students can share their resources, experiences, and ideas with others: always a space to present ideas and get feedback from others. Building community. Isolating and frustrating to be a student leader sometimes Students can organize and collaborate with others in order to create events and programs that are more successful Meet monthly or so, provide food that you can scoop to draw people in!

7 meet the scoopers You might be a new club/organization.

8 meet the scoopers You might be a new club/organization. You might have been around for a few years.

9 meet the scoopers You might be a new club/organization. You might have been around for a few years. You’ve seen the Campus Events Calendar.

10 meet the scoopers You might be a new club/organization. You might have been around for a few years. You’ve seen the Events Calendar. You are juggling other responsibilities too.

11 meet the scoopers You might be a new club/organization. You might have been around for a few years. You’ve seen the Events Calendar. You are juggling other responsibilities too. You’re burnt-out / Afraid of burn-out.

12 meet the scoopers You might be a new club/organization. You might have been around for a few years. You’ve seen the Events Calendar. You are juggling other responsibilities too. You’re burnt-out / Afraid of burn-out. You want to improve your club/organization.

13 meet the scoopers You might be a new club/organization. You might have been around for a few years. You’ve seen the Events Calendar. You are juggling other responsibilities too. You’re burnt-out / Afraid of burn-out. You want to improve your club/organization. You want to learn from other leaders on-campus.

14 Cialdini’s “Principles of Influence” 3 years of participant observation of sales operators, fund-raisers, recruiters, and advertisers 1.Reciprocation 2.Authority 3.Liking/Friendship 4.Social Validation 5.Commitment/Consistency 6.Scarcity

15 Cialdini’s “Principles of Influence” Reciprocation. People are more willing to comply with requests (for favors, services, information, concessions, etc.) from those who have provided such things first. For example, according to the American Disabled Veterans organization, mailing out a simple appeal for donations produces an 18% success rate; but, enclosing a small gift--personalized address labels--boosts the success rate to 35%

16 Cialdini’s “Principles of Influence” Authority. “Hierarchy?” “Expert?” Use expert authority, someone who is an authority, not in authority.

17 Cialdini’s “Principles of Influence” Liking/Friendship. People prefer to say yes to those they know and like. For example, research done on Tupperware Home Demonstration parties shows that guests are 3 times more likely to purchase products because they like the party's hostess than because they like the products.

18 Cialdini’s “Principles of Influence” Social Validation. People are more willing to take a recommended action if they see evidence that many others, especially similar others, are taking it.

19 Cialdini’s “Principles of Influence” Commitment/Consistency. People are more willing to be moved in a particular direction if they see it as consistent with an existing or recent commitment.

20 Cialdini’s “Principles of Influence” Scarcity. People find objects and opportunities more attractive to the degree that they are scarce, rare, or dwindling in availability. Even information that is scarce is more effective.

21 Kouzes and Posner’s Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership “personal best” stories of thousands of leaders 1. Challenge the Process 2. Enable Others to Act 3. Encouraging the Heart 4. Inspire a Shared Vision 5. Model the Way Think about your personal best.

22 leadership Enable Others to Act. Student leaders Enable Others to Act by fostering collaboration and strengthening others. Leaders know they can’t do it alone. Leadership is a team effort. Leaders foster collaboration and build spirited teams. They actively involve others. Leaders understand that they have a responsibility to bring others along. Collaboration is the master skill that enables teams, partnerships, and other alliances to function effectively. The work of leaders is making people feel strong, capable, informed, and connected. For us: Make student leaders feel connected so they are more likely to collaborate.

23 leadership Encouraging the Heart. Student leaders Encourage the Heart by recognizing contributions and celebrating values and victories. Accomplishing extraordinary things in groups and organizations is hard work. The climb to the top is arduous and long; people can become exhausted, frustrated, and disenchanted. They’re often tempted to give up. Genuine acts of caring uplift the spirit and draw people forward. For us: Recognize that everyone has shared experiences and can bring something to the table. Prevent exhaustion and frustration of leaders.

24 leadership Inspire a Shared Vision. Student leaders Inspire a Shared Vision by envisioning the future and enlisting others in a common vision. Leaders are driven by their clear image of possibility and what their organization could become. Leaders passionately believe that they can make a difference. They envision the future, creating an ideal and unique image of what the group, team, or organization can be. Leaders enlist others in their dreams. They breathe life into their visions and get people to see exciting possibilities for the future.

25 leadership Model the Way. Student leaders Model the Way by finding their voice and setting an example. The most important personal quality people look for and admire in a leader is personal credibility. Credibility is the foundation of leadership. If people don’t believe in the messenger, they won’t believe the message. Titles may be granted but leadership is earned. For us: SCOOPS clubs set examples for sustainable events, guide other clubs

26 leadership Challenge the Process. Student leaders Challenge the Process by searching for opportunities and by experimenting, taking risks, and learning from mistakes. Leaders are pioneers—they are willing to step out into the unknown. The work of leaders is change, and the status quo is unacceptable to them. They search for opportunities to innovate, grow, and improve. In doing so, they experiment and take risks. Because leaders know that risk taking involves mistakes and failures, they accept the inevitable disappointments as learning opportunities. Leaders constantly ask, “What can we learn from this?” For us: Challenges the idea that clubs/orgs have to work independently

27 recruit To expand our reach, we looked at groups that fit within the Triple Bottom Line of Sustainability (economic development, social justice, environmental health). Example: Students Against Human Trafficking, Retail Studies Student Association, etc. Ask: Who have we already worked with in the past? Who knows us and we know them? Example: Grass Roots Environmental Efforts Now (GREEN), Into the Wild, etc

28 recruit Activity: Independently, identify the clubs and organizations on your campus that could be SCOOPers. Goal: Work with other on-campus student clubs and organizations that we may not be able to automatically identify or can self-identify themselves as being a part of “Sustainability at SCU”.

29 how will you scoop? [ try it out with your tri-fold ] Fall Map out your year Networking (individual and organization) Organizing events Winter Institutional memory Building membership Spring Recruiting/training new leaders

30 may the ice cream scoop be with you Michelle Tang Student Initiatives Intern, Office of Sustainability Santa Clara University


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