Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

J-TOWN San Jose’s Japantown. IMMIGRATION LAWS 1875 Page Law against entry of Asian laborers 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act specific to Chinese 1885 Alien.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "J-TOWN San Jose’s Japantown. IMMIGRATION LAWS 1875 Page Law against entry of Asian laborers 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act specific to Chinese 1885 Alien."— Presentation transcript:

1 J-TOWN San Jose’s Japantown

2 IMMIGRATION LAWS 1875 Page Law against entry of Asian laborers 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act specific to Chinese 1885 Alien Contract Labor Law 1917 Immigration Act of 1917, included a literacy test 1921 Quota Act, numerical limitations for the first time 1924 Immigration Act further reduced the total number of admissions 1925 the Border Patrol established 1929, immigration to the US limited to 150, Laws aimed at limiting immigration of Filipinos

3 CHINESE EXCLUSION ACT 1882

4 CHINATOWN SAN JOSE

5 San Jose’s second Chinatown mysteriously burnt to the ground in 1887

6 Named for its owner and benefactor, John Heinlen, Heinlenville came about after Heinlen, who liked the Chinese, offered up his own property for the new location. Ignoring the public outrage, it was here that Heinlen built a Chinatown entirely out of brick which he then rented to the Chinese at very low rates. HEINLENVILLE

7 John Heinlen, a local businessman, braved death threats to lease property to the displaced Chinese. This area near today’s Japantown at Taylor and Sixth became known as Heinlenville. Heinlenville was a center of Chinese- American business and cultural life through the early part of the 20th century. Despite their poverty, the people of Heinlenville donated their earnings from menial jobs to build their much revered Ng Shing Gung, a community center and house of worship.Ng Shing Gung JOHN HEINLEN

8 Immigrants from Japan When the first Japanese began to arrive in San Jose in the 1890’s, they settled east of Sixth Street between Jackson and Taylor Streets, near the Heinlenville Chinatown.

9 YearChineseJapanese , , , , ,0642, , , ,049 CHINESE AND JAPANESE IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY Lukes and Okihiro, 1985:19

10 PICTURE BRIDES

11 laws enacted by various Western states that prevented Japanese (and other Asian) immigrants from purchasing land. First enacted in the 1910s, the laws generally remained in effect until well after World War II. ALIEN LAND ACTS

12 IsseiNiseiSansei First generation immigrant Japanese American most of whom came to the US between 1885 and 1924 American- born children of Japanese immigrants American- born grandchildren of Japanese immigrants

13 YonseiGoseiShin-Issei American-born great grandchildren of Japanese immigrants American-born great-great grandchildren of Japanese immigrants New Issei, newcomers to the US after WWII

14 the 1908 agreement between Japan and the United States that halted Japanese labor migration to the United States. GENTLEMEN'S AGREEMENT

15 legislation that restricted overall immigration to the United States and banned further Japanese immigration. IMMIGRATION ACT OF 1924:

16 IMMIGRATION STATION

17 CHINESE DINING ROOM

18 JAPANESE WOMEN AT ANGEL ISLAND

19 The hospital on Angel Island had a state-of-the- art laboratory Racial and ethnic segregation policy at the hospital and immigration station; separate entrances for whites and Asians; separate staircases; separate patient wards— Europeans kept in separate wards HOSPITAL

20 SARAH WINCHESTER HAD MANY JAPANESE EMPLOYEES

21 TOMMIE NISHIHARA AND GRANDDAUGHTER

22 MOON BRIDGE, IMPORTED FROM JAPAN, BELONGING TO SARAH WINCHESTER

23 ITO NISHIHARA WITH BABY DAUGHTER, FLANKED BY THE HANSON BOYS AT THE WINCHESTER RANCH

24 MRS. NISHIHARA AND HANSON BABY

25 1940 BEFORE THE WAR NISEI QUEEN

26 EXECUTIVE ORDER 9066

27 JAPANESE AMEICAN INTERNMENT After Executive Order 9066

28 REPORTING FOR REGISTRATION Obeying the law

29

30 MANZANAR Uchida Family, three generations

31 WRA RELOCATION CENTERS Manzanar California March ,046 Manzanar Tule Lake California May ,789 Tule Lake Poston Arizona May ,814 Poston Gila River Arizona July ,348 Gila River Granada Colorado August ,318 Granada Heart Mountain Wy August ,767 Heart Mountain Minidoka Idaho August ,397 Minidoka Topaz Utah September ,130 Topaz Rohwer Arkansas Sept ,475 Rohwer Jerome Arkansas Oct ,497 Jerome

32

33 DRAFT RESISTERS “no no boys”

34 US MILITARY Masaru Nakagaki

35 TULE LAKE Japanese Language School

36 RETURNING AFTER THE WAR Santa Clara Valley

37 NIHONMACHI JAPANTOWN

38 “JAPANTOWN” NIHONMACHI The term "Japantown" encompasses a wide range of communities, from large Nihonmachi in metropolitan areas that include numerous community institutions and businesses, to rural Japantowns with relatively small populations and more limited community facilities.

39 Why do you think were German-Americans and Italian Americans not encamped?

40 the first statewide project to document historic resources of pre-World War II Japantowns. PRESERVING CALIFORNIA’S JAPANTOWNS

41 The three Japantowns in San Francisco, San Jose, and Los Angeles are the last of the major Japanese communities to survive the demolition during urban renewal in the 1950’s and 1960’s and the forced evacuation and incarceration of Japanese Americans in concentration camps during World War II. They provide a true sense of place for Japanese Americans today.


Download ppt "J-TOWN San Jose’s Japantown. IMMIGRATION LAWS 1875 Page Law against entry of Asian laborers 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act specific to Chinese 1885 Alien."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google