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UYSA Small Sided Games “How Will It Impact Your Program?” Greg Maas State Technical Director, Utah Youth Soccer Association USSF A License, NSCAA International.

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Presentation on theme: "UYSA Small Sided Games “How Will It Impact Your Program?” Greg Maas State Technical Director, Utah Youth Soccer Association USSF A License, NSCAA International."— Presentation transcript:

1 UYSA Small Sided Games “How Will It Impact Your Program?” Greg Maas State Technical Director, Utah Youth Soccer Association USSF A License, NSCAA International Premier Diploma, USSF National Youth License; US Soccer, NSCAA and US Youth Soccer National Staff Coach and Instructor; and Region IV Boys ODP Region Staff Coach

2 The World’s Game

3 Background In August 2002, US Youth Soccer and our 55 State Associations unanimously approved changes to the Policy on Players and Playing Rules for those under the age of twelve. Effective September 1, 2003 these new rules for Small Sided Games will be implemented nationwide.

4 Rationale  More touches on the ball.  Greater exposure to technical and tactical situations.  Intuitive development - transition becomes automatic.  Goal scoring opportunities is increased.  Greater involvement and motivation.  More FUN!

5 Considerations  Larger numbers on the field (i.e., 11 v 11) create more concern about positions and systems, versus the general development of the individual player and their understanding of the concepts of the game.  At the younger ages, spatial awareness and the lack of technical and tactical range often sets the players up for failure.  Most coaches are parent coach volunteers with limited soccer background, yet are faced with arguably the most critical period of player development in soccer.  Coaching games with larger numbers than 6 v 6 are often too complicated, so coaches often focus on structural issues (i.e., formation and positions) rather than individual technique and small group tactics.

6 Are Your Priorities in Order?

7 UYSA Soccer Mandates Effective Season  U6/7No more than 4 v 4 No Goalkeepers  U8/9No more than 6 v 6 Goalkeepers  U10/11No more than 8 v 8Goalkeepers  U12+11 v 11Goalkeepers

8 The International Game Small Sided Games – National Associations  Belgium: U6-8 5 v 5; U v 8  Canada: U6 3 v 3; U8 4 v 4; U10 7 v 7 U12 8 v 8  England: U8 5 v 5; U10 7 v 7 to 8 v 8  Germany: U6 4 v 4; U v 6 to 8 v 8  Ireland: U8 5 v 5; U10 7 v 7; U12 9 v 9  Netherlands: U7 4 v 4; U v 7  Norway: U v 5; U v 7  Romania: U v 5 to 8 v 8  Scotland: U8 4 v 4; U v 6 to 8 v 8  Spain: U v 5; U v 7

9 Are You The Next...

10 Recommended Guidelines  U6/74 v 4 Field: x Goals:5 x 10, Pop-Ups, Corner Flags, or Cones Roster:Single Field 6-8/Duel Field  U8/96 v 6 Field:35-45 x Goals:6 x 18 Roster:Single Field 8-10/Duel Field  U10/118 v 8 Field:45-55 x Goals:7 x 21 Roster:10-14  U12+11 v 11 Field: 110 x 70 Goals:Regulation Roster:Maximum 18

11 Logistical Challenges  Field Availability  Marking and Size  Referees  No Need At U6/7  Coaches  Field Coordinators and Facilitators  Roster Size  Single vs. Duel Field  Goals  Cones, Corner Flags Are Inexpensive  Playing Rules  Readily Available

12 Are We Too Organized?  Coaches feel more pressure to win.  Team play is priority versus player development.  Instructions offered to players are driven by pressure to win or achieve certain goals.  Players are discouraged to dribble in favor of passing or “kicking.”  Direct play is safer method and preferred.  Mistakes are often frowned upon.  Youth play resembles adult sport.  Positional organization is more important than free play or the freedom of expression.  Kids have forgotten how to “play.”

13 Teaching The Game 3 Principles of Soccer: Attacking, Defending, and Transition Attacking Principles:  Make the field as large as possible. Get wide and Deep.  Pass the ball deep (forward) when possible.  Keep possession.  Create chances to score as often as possible. Defending Principles:  Make the field as small as possible.  Press the ball (go to it).  Delay the ball (go back toward own goal).  Squeeze the field (move toward the flanks).  Pressure the ball and keep good depth and balance.

14 Teaching The Game 3 Principles of Soccer: Attacking, Defending, and Transition Transition Principles: When losing possession:  Nearest player provides immediate pressure to ball.  Remaining players recover behind the ball. When regaining possession:  Player in possession attempts to move the ball forward.  Players close to the ball offer good support.  Players away from the ball make the field as large as possible.

15 Frequently Asked Questions Whose Idea Was This? US Youth Soccer has been a proponent of Small Sided Games since the 1980’s. Small Sided Games are endorsed by our US National Staff Coaches, US National Staff Instructors, State Directors of Coaching (Technical Directors), US National Team Coaches, State Association and Region Presidents; including, many foreign soccer Organizations, such as: England, Ireland, Scotland, Germany, France, Brazil and Korea to name a few. Will I Need More Coaches? No, if you currently play 8 v 8 for U8’s, you probably have twelve players rostered per team. To Play 6 v 6 without changing your roster simply use the “Duel-Field” method and roster size can actually be increased to 16.

16 F.A.Q. Continued Will I Need More Fields? Rather than build new fields, “convert” your existing ones. For U11 8 v 8, they can play the width of an existing full sized field and 4 v 4 fields can be laid out in grassy spaces for play. Will I Need More Referees? Small Sided Games rarely need more than one referee to cover the Field. U6-8 do not need referees, only field supervisors or monitors. Parents or acting coaches can also referee the game. Will I Need More Goals? Yes, but they should not be permanent or expensive. A number of Manufacturers produce lightweight portable goals or you can simply use traffic Cones or corner flags. Remember – don’t let children play on the goals.

17 F.A.Q. Continued We’ll Have To Break Up Our Current Roster! No, simply adopt the “Duel-Field” method, which will actually allow for increased roster size. How Many Players On A Roster? If playing 4 v 4 no more than eight, 6 v 6 no more than 10. Since participation is a priority, every player should play 50% of the game. If playing a “Duel-Field” method, you could have as many as 14 on a 4 v 4 Team or 18 on a 6 v 6 team. What Is The “Duel-Field” Method? Recommended for 4 v 4 and 6 v 6. Two fields side by side with substitutes and coaches between. Players rotate from field “A” to field “B” to substitute. This maximizes player participation. Each teams coach monitors one of the fields.

18 Duel-Field System Example: 3 v 3 (up to 12 per team) Field “A”  One coach or field monitor manages both teams in a 3 v 3 game and up to three substitutes. Coaches and Substitutes  An assistant coach or team parent manages the substitutes in between both fields.  At halftime, one team rotates from field “A” to field “B” creating a new opponent.  Spectators cheer from the outside, but not from behind the goals. Field “B”  One coach or field monitor manages both teams in a 3 v 3 game and up to three substitutes.

19 Available Resources (Guidelines of Play, Player & Coaching Development, and More)  Utah Youth Soccer Association  United States Youth Soccer Association  United States Soccer Federation  National Soccer Coaches Association of America

20 UYSA Small Sided Games “You Can Make The Difference!” Greg Maas State Technical Director, Utah Youth Soccer Association USSF A License, NSCAA International Premier Diploma, USSF National Youth License; US Soccer, NSCAA and US Youth Soccer National Staff Coach and Instructor; and Region IV Boys ODP Region Staff Coach


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