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Personal Protective Equipment P.P.E. Level 1. Personal Protective Equipment PPE is any piece of equipment or clothing that protects you from either;

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Presentation on theme: "Personal Protective Equipment P.P.E. Level 1. Personal Protective Equipment PPE is any piece of equipment or clothing that protects you from either;"— Presentation transcript:

1 Personal Protective Equipment P.P.E. Level 1

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3 Personal Protective Equipment PPE is any piece of equipment or clothing that protects you from either; Normal day to day hazards e.g. –Overalls - Protect you from every day dirt, grease, oil, etc. –Gloves - Protect you from cuts and scratches when handling sharp metal. –Welding -Protects your face and eyes from the harmful light given head shield off by the welding process. –Unexpected events / accidents –e.g. -Safety boots -Protect your feet in the event anything heavy is dropped on to them. -Safety glasses -Protect your eyes in the event of flying particles or sparks.

4 Personal Protective Equipment Using PPE is often essential, but it is generally the last line of defence after engineering controls, work practices, and administrative controls. Engineering controls Involve the physical changing of a machine or work environment. Administrative controls Involve how and when employees do their job, such as scheduling work and rotating employees. Work practices Involve training workers how to perform tasks in safe ways that reduce their exposure to hazards. The employer assesses the workplace to determine which of the above controls are necessary. Once all of these controls are in place PPE must then be looked at and the appropriate items selected for the tasks the workers perform.

5 Personal Protective Equipment Employees must also be adequately trained in the correct use of their PPE this training should include; How to use it correctly Awareness of when PPE is necessary Awareness of the limitations of PPE Care and maintenance of PPE All PPE must be CE marked

6 P.P.E. – Overalls The picture to the left is an example of the mandatory overalls sign. The sign can have text as shown here or just be a picture. Wherever this sign is displayed overalls must be worn.

7 P.P.E. – Overalls There are many different types of overalls available, each is designed and constructed to different specifications depending on the intended application. Overalls can be made of several different materials. These include; –Nylon –Cotton –Polyester –Poly-cotton (a mix of polyester and cotton) –Chemically treated cotton –Nomex ®™ (a synthetic flame proof fabric) Overalls used in garages are usually made from nylon, as nylon is easily cleaned of oil or grease. These overalls are unsuitable for welding as can nylon melt and burn. Overalls used in welding are usually made from chemically treated cotton such as Proban®™ as they need to be flame retardant (will not support combustion). Overalls made of Nomex ®™ have the advantages of both types of materials. They are easily cleaned of any oil, grease, etc. and are totally flame proof. Their only disadvantage is the cost as they are very expensive.

8 P.P.E. – Overalls Overalls can be of a on piece design as in the case of the classic boiler suit, or a two piece jacket and trousers. The decision on which is best can be down too personnel preference, corporate image, application and cost.

9 P.P.E. – Overalls Overalls protect you from;Things that would make overalls unfit for use;

10 P.P.E. – Safety boots The picture to the left is an example of the mandatory footwear sign. The sign can have text as shown here or just be a picture. Wherever this sign is displayed protective foot wear must be worn.

11 P.P.E. – Safety boots

12 Appropriate safety footwear should always be used when working in the engineering environment. Ordinary shoes / trainers offer no protection against crush or penetration injuries. The Steel Toe Caps are manufactured in accordance with the EN Standards. Boots manufactured to EN are designed to withstand a dynamic static test of 2 tons (200 joules). Safety boot are designed to withstand a variety of hazards here are some of the design features you should look for in a safety boot. Steel Mid-Sole -Penetration Resistance (Optional) Reinforced side stitching for excellent bonding. Antistatic sole can be produced on request only. (Special request) The steel toe cap meets the standards of EN Built to withstand an impact of 200 joules. Non-slip Vulcanised Nitrile Rubber sole with special design pattern for extra grip Oil resistance. (Rubber sole) Heat resistance. (Rubber sole)Genuine upper leather

13 P.P.E. – Safety boots

14 Safety boots protect you from;Things that would make Safety boots unfit for use;

15 P.P.E. – Helmets The picture to the left is an example of the mandatory helmet sign. The sign can have text as shown here or just be a picture. Wherever this sign is displayed helmets must be worn.

16 P.P.E. – Helmets The primary purpose of a safety helmet is to protect the head of the wearer against hazards, mechanical shocks. It may in addition provide protection against other for example, mechanical, thermal and electrical. A safety helmet should fulfil the following requirements in order to reduce the harmful effects of shocks to the head: It should limit the pressure applied to the skull by spreading the load over the largest possible surface. This is achieved by providing a sufficiently large harness that closely match various skull shapes, together with a hard shell strong enough to prevent the head from coming into direct contact with accidentally falling objects and to provide protection if the wearer’s head should hit a hard surface. The shell must therefore resist deformation and perforation.

17 P.P.E. – Helmets It should deflect falling objects by having a suitably smooth and rounded shape. A helmet with protruding ridges tends to arrest falling objects rather than to deflect them and thus retain slightly more kinetic energy than helmets which are perfectly smooth. It should dissipate and disperse the energy that may be transmitted to it in such a way that the energy is not passed totally to the head and neck. This is achieved by means of the harness, which must be securely fixed to the hard shell so that it can absorb a shock without being detached from the shell. The harness must also be flexible enough to undergo deformation under impact without touching the inside surface of the shell. This deformation, which absorbs most of the energy of a shock, is limited by the minimum amount of clearance between the hard shell and the skull and by the maximum elongation of the harness before it breaks. Thus the rigidity or stiffness of the harness should be the result of a compromise between the maximum amount of energy that it is designed to absorb and the progressive rate at which the shock is to be allowed to be transmitted to the head.

18 P.P.E. – Helmets Helmets protect you from;Things that would make helmets unfit for use;

19 P.P.E. – Gloves The picture to the left is an example of the mandatory protective glove sign. The sign can have text as shown here or just be a picture. Wherever this sign is displayed protective gloves must be worn.

20 P.P.E. – Gloves

21 There are many different types of safety glove available, each designed for a specific purpose. What makes one glove suitable for one purpose does not necessarily make it suitable for another. Some gloves are designed to protect you from your work environment like in the case of leather welding gauntlets. Whilst other gloves are designed to protect your working environment from you like in the case of surgeons latex gloves. The welding industry mainly uses leather gauntlets as they offer protection against the majority of hazards associated with welding, cuts, burns, U.V. radiation, etc.

22 P.P.E. – Gloves Other types of gloves that you may encounter include; Riggers gloves. –These have a leather palm and thumb for protection but have a cotton back. This makes them lighter / more comfortable to wear. These gloves are use for general lifting and carrying and fabrication work as they give the wearer a greater feel. These gloves are not suitable for welding as the cotton back offers little if any protection against sparks and heat. Synthetic fibre gloves –These gloves are made from man-made fibres such as Kevlar®™, spectra ®™ and dyneema ®™ these are collectively known as aramid fibres and have high strength and wear characteristics especially against cuts and abrasion. They are also relatively unaffected by heat. They are sometimes used in the stainless steel industry as newly cut stainless has razor sharp edges. These gloves offer the highest degree of flexibility and touch but are very expensive.

23 P.P.E. – Gloves Gloves protect you from;Things that would make gloves unfit for use;

24 P.P.E. – Eye protection The picture to the left is an example of the mandatory eye protection sign. The sign can have text as shown here or just be a picture. Wherever this sign is displayed eye protection must be worn.

25 P.P.E. – Eye protection

26 Eye protection comes in many different forms. Some are more suitable for your work environment than others. They all perform the same basic task which is to protect your eyes from flying partials and debris. Some glasses have additional coating to protect the wearer from bright and U.V. light. Most modern safety glasses are not made of glass as it can brake or shatter when struck, but are made of polycarbonate a tough form of plastic used in bullet proof glass. The glasses pictured above left have been shot with a shotgun from a distance of ten metres, not one of the pellets penetrated the lenses.

27 P.P.E. – Eye protection Eye protection protect you from; Things that would make Eye protection unfit for use;

28 P.P.E. – Ear protection The picture to the left is an example of the mandatory ear protection sign. The sign can have text as shown here or just be a picture. Wherever this sign is displayed ear protection must be worn.

29 P.P.E. – Ear protection If the environment you work in is too noisy, then hearing protection may be necessary. The action levels for noise are as follows: Between 85 dB(A) and 90 dB(A) –daily personal noise exposure hearing protection must be provided on request, but the wearing of such hearing protection is not mandatory. Above 90 dB(A) –daily personal noise exposure, a noise assessment must be carried out. Wearing hearing protection in these circumstances is mandatory. It is worth noting that the exposure levels above are not ‘safe’. In particular, at 90 dB(A) there is approximately a 14% chance of an individual developing serious permanent hearing loss over the course of a number of years. This loss cannot be compensated for by the use of a hearing aid. Hearing protection is also appropriate in situations where there are sudden loud noises due to explosions. You will know that you need a noise assessment if there is anywhere, where people work, where you have to shout to make yourself heard by someone standing a metre away from you.

30 P.P.E. – Ear protection One of the most common types of ear protection are disposable and semi- disposable ear plugs. As the name suggests these are used to plug the ear thus stopping noise from getting in.

31 P.P.E. – Ear protection

32 Ear protection protect you from; Things that would make ear protection unfit for use;

33 P.P.E. – Respiratory protection The picture to the left is an example of the mandatory respiratory protection sign. The sign can have text as shown here or just be a picture. Wherever this sign is displayed respiratory protection must be worn.

34 P.P.E. – Respiratory protection Oranganic Vapour / Particulate Respirator. Used for organic gases and vapours as well as particulates concerning dust, mist and fume. Suitable for welding applications and maintenance work shops. Protection against organic vapours with BP >65ºC & good warning properties (water and oil based) and particulates. Maximum use limitation for organic vapours 10 x WEL or 1000ppm, whichever is the lowest and 10 x WEL for particulates

35 P.P.E. – Respiratory protection Respiratory protection protect you from; Things that would make Respiratory protection unfit for use;

36 P.P.E. – Face mask The picture to the left is an example of the mandatory face mask sign. The sign can have text as shown here or just be a picture. Wherever this sign is displayed face mask must be worn.

37 P.P.E. – Face mask FFP2 respirators are CE certified to the new EN149:2001 standard for use against both solid and liquid aerosols.

38 P.P.E. – Face mask Face mask protect you from; Things that would make face mask unfit for use;

39 P.P.E. – Hi Vis Vest The picture to the left is an example of the mandatory hi vis vest sign. The sign can have text as shown here or just be a picture. Wherever this sign is displayed hi vis vest must be worn.

40 Hi Vis Vest are worn to make sure you are seen, some have additional writing on to show that you hold some special position within the organization; e.g. fire marshal, first aider, etc.

41 P.P.E. – Hi Vis vest Hi Vis vest protect you from; Things that would make Hi Vis vest unfit for use;

42 Why you should wear P.P.E.


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