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Dialogic Teaching in Your Classroom in order to Promote Argument Literacy Monica Glina University of Oslo Joe Oyler, Alina Reznitskaya, Alexandra Major,

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Presentation on theme: "Dialogic Teaching in Your Classroom in order to Promote Argument Literacy Monica Glina University of Oslo Joe Oyler, Alina Reznitskaya, Alexandra Major,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Dialogic Teaching in Your Classroom in order to Promote Argument Literacy Monica Glina University of Oslo Joe Oyler, Alina Reznitskaya, Alexandra Major, Laurie Zelman Montclair State University Ian Wilkinson Ohio State University 1

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3 Sponsor  The Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education  Grant # R305A

4 Common Core State Standards To improve students’ ability and predisposition to comprehend, formulate and evaluate arguments, or argument literacy Common Core: Argument skills are “broadly important for the literate, educated person living in the diverse, information-rich environment of the twenty- first century” (p. 25). 4

5 Common Core State Standards In Grade 5, students will be able to:  “Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.” [formulating arguments when speaking and listening]  “Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.” [comprehending spoken arguments]  “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which points(s).” [comprehending written arguments]  “Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.” [formulating written arguments]

6 What is Inquiry Dialogue?  It is a type of talk where we search for the most reasonable answer. We use talk collaboratively to think together to find the best answer.  Students take considerable control over the flow of the discussion.  Teacher acts as a responsive facilitator by strategically choosing interventions or talk moves to support good argumentation.  It is initiated by a BIG question about a contestable issue.  It closes with reflection on processes and outcomes.

7 Let’s Try It!

8 What Should Kelly Do?  What did you see the students (You!) doing?  What did you see the teacher (Joe) doing?

9 Post-Discussion Student Activities  Goal: To promote transfer to new tasks performed individually  Speaking:  What is your position now? Explain it to your partner.  What are 2 new ideas about Kelly’s decision that you heard during the discussion? How did they affect your position?  Writing:  List 1 strongest reason for and 1 strongest reason against your position.  Re-write/ Complete the story based on the group’s position.  Write a letter to relevant party (Editors of TFK) to express the group’s position.  Reading:  Underline information in text that could be used to support your position.  Underline information in the text that could be used against your position.  Share with your peer

10 Pre-Discussion Student Activities  Goal: Activate prior knowledge and get students invested in the discussion  The activities should feed into the discussion, but not structure the discussion – Light Touch  Thinking journals, post-it notes, drawings  Take a position (to be reviewed after the discussion)  Is there anything that is confusing or surprising to you?  Is there anything you feel strongly about?  Make connections: text-text, text-self, text-world  Small group work: think-pair-share

11 Argument Rating Tool: 4 Criteria + 11 Talk Moves

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14 Questions?


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