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Understanding of Terminology & Expectation for Engineering Programme Ir. Professor Dr. BM Goi Deputy Dean of LKCFES, UTAR Ir. Professor Academician Dato’

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Presentation on theme: "Understanding of Terminology & Expectation for Engineering Programme Ir. Professor Dr. BM Goi Deputy Dean of LKCFES, UTAR Ir. Professor Academician Dato’"— Presentation transcript:

1 Understanding of Terminology & Expectation for Engineering Programme Ir. Professor Dr. BM Goi Deputy Dean of LKCFES, UTAR Ir. Professor Academician Dato’ Dr. HT Chuah President of FEIAP

2 Outcome from the Workshop At the end of this presentation, participants shall be able: To describe the new WA’s terminologies (complex engineering problems & activities, knowledge profile) To differentiate characteristic of WA, SA and DA.

3 Agreements covering tertiary qualifications in engineering The Washington Accord (WA) signed in 1989 was the first - it recognises substantial equivalence in the accreditation of qualifications in professional engineering, normally of four years duration. The Sydney Accord (SA) commenced in 2001 and recognises substantial equivalence in the accreditation of qualifications in engineering technology, normally of three years duration. The Dublin Accord (DA) is an agreement for substantial equivalence in the accreditation of tertiary qualifications in technician engineering, normally of two years duration. It commenced in Agreements (IEA)

4  OBE is an educational philosophy that states education ought to aim at giving students a particular, minimum level of knowledge and abilities as the major educational outcomes  It is an education system that emphasized on the student outcomes that are expected by the stakeholders.  Input –> Process –> Output  Shifting from just measuring input and process to measuring the output (outcome) Outcome-Based Education

5 TermDefinitionCommon Term Programme Objectives (PEO) PEOs are statements that describe the expected achievements of graduates in their career and professional life a few years after graduation. Goals, Programme Objectives Programme Outcomes (PO) POs are statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to perform or do by the time of graduation. These relate to the knowledge, skills and attitudes that students acquired through the programme. Standards, Graduate attributes Course Outcomes (CO) COs are statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to perform or do upon completion of a course. Learning Outcomes Outcome-Based Education

6 6 Curriculum, Staff & Facilities Graduates with Outcomes Teaching & Learning Stakeholders requirements (Develop objectives) Stakeholders satisfaction (Achieving objectives) Continual Improvement Process Map

7 “New Terminologies” Knowledge Profile (WK) Complex Problem Solving (WP) Complex Engineering Activities (EA) Generic Attributes (WA)

8 WK1Theory-based natural sciences WK2Conceptually-based mathematics WK3Theory-based engineering fundamentals WK4Forefront specialist knowledge for practice WK5Engineering design WK6Engineering practice (technology) WK7Engineering in society WK8Research literature A Washington Accord Programme provides: Knowledge Profile (Curriculum)

9 Knowledge Profile (WK) (4-5 years) WK1 A systematic, theory-based understanding of the natural sciences applicable to the discipline WK2 Conceptually-based mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics and formal aspects of computer and information science to support analysis and modelling applicable to the discipline WK3 A systematic, theory-based formulation of engineering fundamentals required in the engineering discipline. WK4 Engineering specialist knowledge that provides theoretical frameworks and bodies of knowledge for the accepted practice areas in the engineering discipline; much is at the forefront of the discipline. WK5 Knowledge that supports engineering design in a practice area. WK6 Knowledge of engineering practice (technology) in the practice areas in the engineering discipline WK7 Comprehension of the role of engineering in society and identified issues in engineering practice in the discipline: ethics and the professional responsibility of an engineer to public safety; and the impacts of engineering activity – economic, social, cultural, environmental and sustainability. WK8 Engagement with selected knowledge in the research literature of the discipline.

10 Knowledge Profile (SK) (3-4 years) SK1 A systematic, theory-based understanding of the natural sciences applicable to the sub- discipline SK2 Conceptually-based mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics and formal aspects of computer and information science to support analysis and modelling applicable to the sub-discipline SK3 A systematic, theory-based formulation of engineering fundamentals required in the engineering sub-discipline. SK4 Engineering specialist knowledge that provides theoretical frameworks and bodies of knowledge for the accepted sub-discipline. SK5 Knowledge that supports engineering design in the sub-discipline. SK6 Knowledge of engineering practice (technology) in the sub-discipline SK7 Comprehension of the role of technology in society and identified issues in engineering technology: ethics and impacts: economic, social, environmental and sustainability. SK8 Engagement with the technological literature of the discipline.

11 Knowledge Profile (DK) (2-3 years) DK1 A descriptive, formula-based understanding of the natural sciences applicable to the sub-discipline DK2 Procedural mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics applicable to the sub-discipline DK3 A coherent procedural formulation of engineering fundamentals required in an accepted sub-discipline. DK4 Engineering specialist knowledge that provides the body of knowledge for an accepted sub-discipline. DK5 Knowledge that supports engineering design based on the techniques and procedures of a practice area. DK6 Codified practical engineering knowledge in the recognised practice area. DK7 Knowledge of issues and approaches in engineering technician practice: ethics, financial, cultural, environmental and sustainability impacts. DK8 -

12 WP1 Depth of Knowledge required Resolved with forefront in-depth engineering knowledge (WK3, WK4, WK5, WK6 or WK8) WP2 Range of conflicting requirements Involve wide-ranging or conflicting technical, engineering and other issues. WP3 Depth of analysis required Have no obvious solution and require abstract thinking, originality in analysis to formulate suitable models. WP4 Familiarity of issues Involve infrequently encountered issues WP5 Extent of applicable codes Beyond codes of practice WP6 Extent of stakeholder involvement and level of conflicting requirements Involve diverse groups of stakeholders with widely varying needs WP7 Interdependence Are high level problems including many component parts or sub-problems. EP1 Consequences Have significant consequences in a range of contexts. EP2 Judgement Require judgement in decision making. Complex Engineering Problems have characteristic WP1 and some or all of WP2 to WP7 (EP1 or EP2 – Professional Competencies): Complex Engineering Problem

13 SP1 Depth of Knowledge required Cannot be resolved without engineering knowledge at the level of one or more of SK 4, SK5, and SK6 supported by SK3 with a strong emphasis on the application of developed technology SP2 Range of conflicting requirements Involve a variety of factors which may impose conflicting constraints SP3 Depth of analysis required Can be solved by application of well-proven analysis techniques SP4 Familiarity of issues Belong to families of familiar problems which are solved in well- accepted ways SP5 Extent of applicable codes May be partially outside those encompassed by standards or codes of practice SP6 Extent of stakeholder involvement and level of conflicting requirements Involve several groups of stakeholders with differing and occasionally conflicting needs SP7 Interdependence Are parts of, or systems within complex engineering problems TP1 Consequences Have consequences which are important locally, but may extend more widely TP2 Judgement Require judgement in decision making Complex Engineering Problems have characteristic WP1 and some or all of SP2 to SP7 (TP1 or TP2 – Technology Competencies): Broadly-defined Engineering Problem

14 DP1Depth of Knowledge required Cannot be resolved without extensive practical knowledge as reflected in DK5 and DK6 supported by theoretical knowledge defined in DK3 and DK4 DP2Range of conflicting requirements Involve several issues, but with few of these exerting conflicting constraints DP3 Depth of analysis requiredCan be solved in standardised ways DP4Familiarity of issues Are frequently encountered and thus familiar to most practitioners in the practice area DP5Extent of applicable codes Are encompassed by standards and/or documented codes of practice DP6Extent of stakeholder involvement and level of conflicting requirements Involve a limited range of stakeholders with differing needs DP7Interdependence Are discrete components of engineering systems NP1Consequences Have consequences which are locally important and not far- reaching Judgement - Complex Engineering Problems have characteristic WP1 and some or all of DP2 to DP7 (NP1 or NP2 – Technical Competencies): Well-defined Engineering Problem

15 EA1Range of resourcesDiverse resources (people, money, equipment, materials, information and technologies). EA2Level of interactionRequire resolution of significant problems arising from interactions between wide ranging or conflicting technical, engineering or other issues. EA3InnovationInvolve creative use of engineering principles and research-based knowledge in novel ways EA4Consequences to society and the environment Have significant consequences in a range of contexts, characterised by difficulty of prediction and mitigation. EA5FamiliarityCan extend beyond previous experiences by applying principles-based approaches. Complex activities means (engineering) activities or projects that have some or all of the following characteristics: Complex Engineering Activities

16 Range of Problem Solving: Compulsory Attribute DepthofKnowledgeRequired Complex Problems (Engineer) Broadly Defined Problems (Technologist) Well defined Problems (Technician) WP1: Cannot be resolved without in-depth engineering knowledge at the level of one or more of WK3, WK4, WK5, WK6 or WK8 which allows a fundamentals-based first principles analytical approach. SP1: Cannot be resolved without engineering knowledge at the level of one or more of SK4, SK5, and SK6 supported by SK3 with a strong emphasis on the application of developed technology. DP1: Cannot be resolved without extensive practical knowledge as reflected in DK5 and DK6 supported by theoretical knowledge defined in DK3 and DK4.

17 GRADUATE ATTRIBUTE PROFILES (Programme Outcomes) - Specific for Washington Accord

18 WA & EAC POs WA: Washington Accord Graduate Attributes EA: Engineering Accreditation Council Programme Outcomes WA1EA(i) Engineering KnowledgeBreadth & depth of knowledge WA2EA(ii) Problem AnalysisComplexity of analysis WA3EA(iii) Design/Development of Solutions Breadth & uniqueness of engineering problems i.e. the extent to which problems are original and to which solutions have previously been identified and coded WA4EA(iv) InvestigationBreadth & depth of investigation and experimentation WA5EA(v) Modern Tool UsageLevel of understanding of the appropriateness of the tool WA6EA(vi) The Engineer and SocietyLevel of knowledge and responsibility WA7EA(vii) Environment and SustainabilityType of solutions WA8EA(viii) EthicsUnderstanding and level of practice WA10EA(ix) CommunicationLevel of communication according to type of activities performed WA9EA(x) Individual and Team WorkRole in and diversity of team WA12EA(xi) Life-long LearningPreparation for and depth of continuing learning WA11EA(xii) Engineering Project Management and Finance Level of management required for differing types of activity

19 PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES) (i) Engineering Knowledge - Breadth & depth of knowledge (WA1) Apply knowledge of mathematics, natural science, engineering fundamentals and an engineering specialisation as specified in WK1 to WK4 respectively to the solution of complex engineering problems.

20 (ii) Problem Analysis - Complexity of analysis (WA2) Identify, formulate, research literature and analyse complex engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics, natural sciences and engineering sciences. (WK1 to WK4) PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

21 (iii) Design/Development of Solutions - Breadth and uniqueness of engineering problems, i.e. the extent to which problems are original and to which solutions have previously been identified or codified (WA3) Design solutions for complex engineering problems and design systems, components or processes that meet specified needs with appropriate consideration for public health and safety, cultural, societal, and environmental considerations. (WK5) PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

22 (iv) Investigation - Breadth and depth of investigation and experimentation (WA4) Conduct investigation of complex problems using research-based knowledge (WK8) and research methods including design of experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and synthesis of information to provide valid conclusions. PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

23 (v) Modern Tool Usage - Level of understanding of the appropriateness of the tool (WA5) Create, select and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and IT tools, including prediction and modelling, to complex engineering activities, with an understanding of the limitations. (WK6) PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

24 (vi) The Engineer and Society – Level of knowledge and responsibility (WA6) Apply reasoning informed by contextual knowledge to assess societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to professional engineering practice and solution to complex engineering problems. (WK7) PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

25 (vii) Environment and Sustainability – Type of solutions (WA7) Understand and evaluate the sustainability and impact of professional engineering work in the solution of complex engineering problems in societal and environmental contexts. (WK7) PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

26 (viii) Ethics – Understanding and level of practice (WA8) Apply ethical principles and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of engineering practice. (WK7) PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

27 (ix) Communication – Level of communication according to type of activities performed (WA10) Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the engineering community and with society at large, such as being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and give and receive clear instructions. PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

28 (x) Individual and Team Work Role in and diversity of team (WA9) Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in diverse teams and in multi-disciplinary settings. PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

29 (xi) Life-long Learning – Preparation for and depth of continuing learning (WA12) Recognise the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological change. PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

30 (xii) Project Management & Finance – Level of management required for differing types of activity (WA11) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of engineering management principles and economic decision-making and apply these to one’s own work, as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments. PROGRAMME OUTCOMES (GENERIC GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES)

31 GRADUATE ATTRIBUTE PROFILES (Programme Outcomes) - Differentiation among Accords

32 Engineering Knowledge Differentiation Characteristic WASHINGTON ACCORD (WA) SYDNEY ACCORD (SA) DUBLIN ACCORD (DA) Breadth and depth of education and type of knowledge, both theoretical and practical Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals and an engineering specialisation to the solution of complex engineering problems Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals and an engineering specialisation to defined and applied engineering procedures, processes, systems or methodologies Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals and an engineering specialisation to wide practical procedures and practices

33 Problem Analysis Differentiation Characteristic WASADA Complexity of analysis Identify, formulate, research literature and analyse complex engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions using first principles of mathematics, natural sciences and engineering sciences Identify, formulate, research literature and solve broadly- defined engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions using analytical tools appropriate to their discipline or area of specialisation Identify and solve well-defined engineering problems reaching substantiated conclusions using codified methods of analysis specific to their field of activity

34 Design/ development of Solutions WASADADifferentiation Characteristic Breadth and uniqueness of engineering problems i.e. the extent to which problems are original and to which solutions have previously been identified or codified Design solutions for complex engineering problems and design systems, components or processes that meet specified needs with appropriate consideration for public health and safety, cultural, societal, and environmental considerations Design solutions for broadly- defined engineering technology problems and contribute to the design of systems, components or processes to meet specified needs with appropriate consideration for public health and safety, cultural, societal, and Design solutions for well-defined technical problems and assist with the design of systems, components or processes to meet specified needs with appropriate consideration for public health and safety, cultural, societal, and environmental

35 Investigation Differentiation WA Characteristic SADA Breadth and Conduct depth of investigations of investigation and complex experimentation problems using research-based knowledge and research methods including design of experiments, analysis and interpretation of data, and synthesis of information to provide valid conclusions Conduct investigations of broadly-defined problems; locate, search and select relevant data from codes, data bases and literature, design and conduct experiments to provide valid conclusions Conduct investigations of well-defined problems; locate and search relevant codes and catalogues, conduct standard tests and measurements

36 Modern Tool Usage Differentiation Characteristic WASADA Level of understanding of the appropriateness of the tool Create, select, and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and IT tools, including prediction and modelling, to complex engineering activities, with an understanding of the limitations Select and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and IT tools, including prediction and modelling, to broadly defined engineering activities, with an understanding of the limitations Apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and IT tools to well-defined engineering activities, with an awareness of the limitations

37 The Engineer and Society Differentiation WA Characteristic SADA Level of Apply reasoning knowledge informed by and responsibility contextual knowledge to assess societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to professional engineering practice. Demonstrate understanding of the societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to engineering technology practice Demonstrate knowledge of the societal, health, safety, legal and cultural issues and the consequent responsibilities relevant to engineering technician practice

38 Environment and Sustainability Differentiation Characteristic WASADA Type of solutions Understand the impact of professional engineering solutions in societal and environmental contexts and demonstrate knowledge of and need for sustainable development Understand the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and environment contexts and demonstrate knowledge of and need for sustainable development Understand the impact of engineering technician solutions in a societal and environment contexts and demonstrate knowledge of and need for sustainable development

39 Ethics Differentiation WA Characteristic SADA Understanding Apply ethical and level of principles and practice commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of engineering practice Understand and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of engineering technology practice Understand and commit to professional ethics and responsibilities and norms of technician practice

40 Communication Differentiation Characteristic WASA DA Level of communication according to type of activities performed Communicate effectively on complex engineering activities with the engineering community and with society at large, such as being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and Communicate effectively on broadly-defined engineering activities with the engineering community and with society at large, by being able to comprehend and write effective reports and design documentation, make effective presentations, and Communicate effectively on well-defined engineering activities with the engineering community and with society at large, by being able to comprehend the work of others, document their own work, and give and receive clear instructions

41 Individual and Teamwork Differentiation Characteristic WASA DA Role in and diversity of team Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in diverse teams and in multi-disciplinary settings. Function effectively as an individual, and as a member or leader in diverse technical teams. Function effectively as an individual, and as a member in diverse technical teams.

42 Life-long Learning Differentiation Characteristic WASADA Preparation for and depth of continuing learning Recognise the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context of technological change Recognise the need for, and have the ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in specialist technologies Recognise the need for, and have the ability to engage in independent updating in the context of specialised technical knowledge

43 Project Management and Finance Differentiation WA Characteristic SADA Level of Demonstrate management knowledge and required for understanding of differing engineering and types of activity management principles and economic decision- making and apply these to one’s own work, as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of engineering management principles and apply these to one’s own work, as a member and leader in a team and to manage projects in multidisciplinary environments Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of engineering management principles and apply these to one’s own work, as a member and leader in a technical team and to manage projects in multidisciplinary environments

44 THANK YOU FOR LISTENING


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