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“So what do you want to study at University, Sam?” “History, Sir.” “Oh, great, what have you read?” “Oh, I don’t like reading, I like History.”

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Presentation on theme: "“So what do you want to study at University, Sam?” “History, Sir.” “Oh, great, what have you read?” “Oh, I don’t like reading, I like History.”"— Presentation transcript:

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2 “So what do you want to study at University, Sam?” “History, Sir.” “Oh, great, what have you read?” “Oh, I don’t like reading, I like History.”

3  Independence of thought  Intellectual adaptability and flexibility.  Serious and mature about learning.  Able to ‘gut an argument’ and synthesise.  How might we facilitate those qualities?

4 Voracious readers Independent thinkers Critical analysts Cogent writers Coherent writers Evaluators of evidence Convincing Debaters Reflective thinkers Good listeners

5 Scholarship and Achievement

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7 Interest Available Useful Comprehend Evaluate Comfortable Fluent Discursive Synthesis Cogent Marking Resilience Scholarship and Achievement

8 Interest Available Useful Comprehend Evaluate Comfortable Fluent Discursive Synthesis Cogent Marking Resilience Scholarship and Achievement

9 READING

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12  It’s boring  Too tired – “easier after a busy day to just sit down and watch TV”  Doing too much sport  I use the internet  “I’m playing on my x-box”

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15  Independent Project in Year 9  Year 13 Coursework which allows students maximum choice  Western Front Association Prize  Prizes in Hist and Arch Quizes  HARD for a few!

16  Grades  Options

17  Glossaries  Appropriate texts  Challenging them to go beyond their comfort zone (esp. In sixth form)  Buy what they want – Amazon orders.

18  Ig theuk azzed ig gromble. Vig un dinned ig glob pell.  “Ac!” un kimmed  What did the theuk do?  What did the theuk do then?  What colour was the pell?  What did the theuk say?

19  Room 17  LRC  Kindle  Local Libraries/Museums/Archives  History Today on-line

20  Be seen with a book – Chris and Caesar!  Use books  Talk about books  Be seen enjoying books

21 Interest Available Useful Comprehend Evaluate Comfortable Fluent Discursive Synthesis Cogent Marking Resilience Scholarship and Achievement

22 REFLECTING

23 F502 Assessing and Developing Argument This unit covers a wide range of argument components building on the skills developed in Unit 1. Analysing and evaluating arguments including assessing strengths and weaknesses, and writing your own original arguments in response to stimulus material. Teaching units and Assessment method and weighting F501 Introduction to Critical Thinking This unit provides an introduction to the important skills in Critical Thinking. It also covers the area of credibility and recognises that the plausibility of an argument is influenced by its origin, be that a person or an organisation.

24  Issue  Conclusion  Reasons  Assumptions  Flaws  Good to start them with articles – History Review, then History Today, then into ‘proper books’

25  “After carefully conditioning a flea to jump out of a box following the presentation of a loud noise, the researcher removed the first pair of legs to see what effect this had. Observing that the flea was still able to perform the task, the scientists removed the second pair of legs. Once again n oting no difference in performance, the researcher removed the final pair of legs and found the jumping behaviour no longer occurred. Thus, the investigator wrote in his notebook, “when all legs have been removed from a flea, it will no longer be able to hear.”  Huck and Sandler Rival Hypotheses 

26 Credibility Criteria CRAVEN CORROBORATI ON REPUTATIONABILITY TO SEE VESTED INTEREST EXPERTISENEUTRALITY

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28  1. Designing a Question  Must be on a topic not covered in the Year 8-9 syllabus.  It must involve answering a question where there is an element of debate.  It must be on a topic where the information is readily available.  2. Form of the Project  It must present an answer to the question which shows consideration of different viewpoints and opinions  It must contain a written part which may be word processed.  It may contain a film, powerpoint or model to help illustrate the answer.

29  3. Resources  You must consult at least FIVE separate sources of information, no more than three of which can be websites.  You should choose a range of sources including: books, websites, magazines, journals, museums, oral histories, pictures and artefacts.  You must EVALUATE at least two (and preferably all) of the sources you use.  You should aim to use PRIMARY and SECONDARY sources.  4. Scope  You will have five lessons and two homeworks – a total of seven hours – in which to complete the task.  You may choose any subject and title so long as it is approved by your teacher.  You may wish to consider attempting to cover an aspect of the First World War to contribute to an entry in the Western Front Association prize competition or other prizes.

30  Footnotes  Should be numbered and arranged at the bottom of each side (not at the end). They should not be used as a means of working in added content or description but merely to provide the reference for a source.  If word processing use Microsoft Word footnoting system – if not in italics to differentiate between text and footnote.  In following form  A.J.P.Taylor, Bismarck, London, 1958 p.125   Bibliographies  These should be established in the same format as footnotes but listed at the end of the work.

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33  5. Assessment  You will complete a self-assessment at the end and will also peer-assess another two projects providing advice for their authors. The project will then be marked by your teacher.

34 Task Done/Standard 1 Are there at least five sources evident within the project? -Is there a balance of sources – primary secondary? -Is there a balance of argument within the sources? -Are they of differing provenance? 2Is it about the subject matter concerned? 3 Has it used evaluative vocabulary? -Comparatives – ‘alternatively’, ‘conversely’, ‘however’, ‘nonetheless’, -Words to indicate judgement – ‘implies’, ‘substantially’ -Words of intensity and extent – ‘primarily’, ‘principally’, ‘marginally’, ‘significantly’ 4 Is the paragraph structure clear? – Introductory sentence, a minimum of two sides to an argument, resolved in an intermediate conclusion at the end. 5Is there clear evaluation of at least TWO of the sources? 6Is the paragraph structure clear – containing intermediate conclusions? 7Are the footnotes clear, appropriate and placed at the bottom of the relevant pages 8Is there a clearly arranged bibliography at the end of the project? 9Is there a Judgement at the end? -Is it clear? -Does it follow from the rest of the project?

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36 KnowledgeChronologyChangeCausationSignificanceInterpretationInvestigationSourcesCommunication Level 4 Describing some of the main events, people and periods identifying where these fit within a chronological framework describe change and continuity identify some causes and consequences identify and describe different interpretations begin to use information as evidence to test ideas They begin to produce structured work Level 5 describing some of the main events, people and some features of past societies in the context of their developing chronological framework begin to recognise and describe change and continuity, suggest relationships between causes. begin to recognise relative significance They suggest some reasons for different interpretations of the past They investigate and begin to ask their own questions They begin to evaluate sources to establish evidence for particular enquiries They select and deploy information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to support and structure their work. Level 6 beginning to analyse the nature and extent of diversity, change and continuity within and across different periods begin to explain relationships between causes Make judgements about the significance of events etc.. begin to explain why different interpretations of the past have arisen Investigate by asking and beginning to refine their own questions They evaluate sources to make choices about Selective, organised and structured work Level 7Analysing historical change and continuity, diversity and causation. Explain how varying perspectives affect the relative importance of events They explain how and why different interpretations of the past have arisen investigate asking and refining their own questions Consider critically issues surrounding the origins, nature and purpose of sources. They select, organise and use relevant information in well-structured work Level 8Pupils show their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history, constructing substantiated analyses about historical change and continuity, diversity and causation They analyse and explain a range of historical interpretations and different judgements about historical significance. They suggest lines of enquiry refining their methods of investigation. They evaluate critically a range of sources and reach substantiated conclusions independently. Use historical terminology confidently. They produce precise and coherent work.

37 KnowledgeChronologyChangeCausationSignificanceInterpretationInvestigationSourcesCommunication Level 4 Describing some of the main events, people and periods identifying where these fit within a chronological framework describe change and continuity identify some causes and consequences identify and describe different interpretations begin to use information as evidence to test ideas They begin to produce structured work Level 5 describing some of the main events, people and some features of past societies in the context of their developing chronological framework begin to recognise and describe change and continuity, suggest relationships between causes. begin to recognise relative significance They suggest some reasons for different interpretations of the past They investigate and begin to ask their own questions They begin to evaluate sources to establish evidence for particular enquiries They select and deploy information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to support and structure their work. Level 6 beginning to analyse the nature and extent of diversity, change and continuity within and across different periods begin to explain relationships between causes Make judgements about the significance of events etc.. begin to explain why different interpretations of the past have arisen Investigate by asking and beginning to refine their own questions They evaluate sources to make choices about Selective, organised and structured work Level 7Analysing historical change and continuity, diversity and causation. Explain how varying perspectives affect the relative importance of events They explain how and why different interpretations of the past have arisen investigate asking and refining their own questions Consider critically issues surrounding the origins, nature and purpose of sources. They select, organise and use relevant information in well-structured work Level 8Pupils show their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history, constructing substantiated analyses about historical change and continuity, diversity and causation They analyse and explain a range of historical interpretations and different judgements about historical significance. They suggest lines of enquiry refining their methods of investigation. They evaluate critically a range of sources and reach substantiated conclusions independently. Use historical terminology confidently. They produce precise and coherent work.

38 What did you find...?...most interesting about this topic?...most difficult about this task?...which was the most useful source of information?...which was the least useful source of information? If you were to do a similar task in future what THREE pieces of advice would be the most helpful? 1 2 3

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40 Marking Grid TaskDone/Standard Is the answer led by the interpretations? Is it about the subject matter concerned? Has it used evaluative vocabulary? -Comparatives – ‘alternatively’, ‘conversely’, ‘however’, ‘nonetheless’, -Words to indicate judgement – ‘implies’, ‘substantially’ -Words of intensity and extent – ‘primarily’, ‘principally’, ‘marginally’, ‘significantly’ Is the paragraph structure clear? – Introductory sentence, a minimum of two sides to an argument, resolved in an intermediate conclusion at the end. Is there clear exemplification for each statement? Are the Interpretations synthesised with own knowledge? Is there clear evidence of corroboration between the Interpretations? Is there a Judgement at the end? -Is it nuanced? -Is it sophisticated? -Is it clear? -Does it follow from the rest of the essay?

41  Using pp in Hite and Hinton suggest what the extreme reasons might be at either end and then where the other views are on the continuum.  Do any not fit neatly into the pattern? Why not?

42 ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES AO1aAO1bAO2a Total mark for each question = 40 Recall, select and deploy historical knowledge appropriately, and communicate knowledge and understanding of history in a clear and effective manner. Demonstrate understanding of the past through explanation, analysis and arriving at substantiated judgements of: – key concepts such as causation, consequence, continuity, change and significance within an historical context; – the relationships between key features and characteristics of the periods studied. As part of an historical enquiry, analyse and evaluate a range of appropriate source material with discrimination. Level IA Answer is clearly structured and coherent; communicates accurately and legibly Selects an appropriate range of accurate, detailed and relevant evidence from personal research Includes accurate footnotes and a bibliography (6) Very good level of understanding of key concepts relevant to analysis and to the topic Argument is relevant and analytical and provides supported judgements (6) Excellent analysis of the problem in its historical context Critical use of a range of research materials High level of discrimination – ie judgement of relevance and relative significance of research materials in relation to the problem (24–28) Level IB Answer is clearly structured and coherent; communicates accurately and legibly Selects an appropriate range of accurate, detailed and relevant evidence from personal research Includes accurate footnotes and a bibliography (6) Very good level of understanding of key concepts relevant to analysis and to the topic Argument is relevant and analytical and provides supported judgements (6) 1.Very good quality of analysis and evaluation of a range of research materials with a good level of discrimination (20–23) Level II Selects mostly accurate, detailed and relevant evidence from personal research Answer is structured and mostly coherent; writing is legible and communication is generally clear Includes accurate footnotes and a bibliography (5) Good level of understanding of key concepts relevant to analysis and to the topic Argument develops explanations but overall judgements may be uneven (5) Good quality of analysis and critical evaluation of a range of sources with discrimination Good understanding of sources in context (18–19)

43 Level III Selects some relevant evidence from personal research Most of the answer is structured and coherent; writing is legible and communication is generally clear Includes accurate footnotes and a bibliography (4) Shows a sound understanding of key concepts relevant to analysis and to the topic Argument may be a mixture of analysis and explanation but also may include description and narrative coupled with some uneven overall judgements; OR the argument may provide more consistent analysis but the quality will be uneven and its support often general or thin (4) Good quality of analysis and critical evaluation of a range of sources with discrimination Good understanding of sources in context but some judgements may be uneven (16–17) Level IV There is deployment of relevant knowledge but level / accuracy of detail will vary Some unclear and/or underdeveloped and/or disorganised sections; mostly satisfactory level of communication There will be footnotes and a bibliography, but not always used appropriately (3) Satisfactory understanding of key concepts relevant to the topic Some argument but evidence not always linked to the question Assertion, description / narrative will characterise part of the answer (3) Mostly satisfactory application of sources to the question but little ability at discriminating between them Limited understanding of the importance of sources in their context of the topic (14–15) Level V Deployment of basic and general historical knowledge but also some irrelevant and inaccurate material Often unclear and disorganised sections; adequate level of communication but some weak prose passages Some attempt to use footnotes and provide a bibliography (2) General understanding of key concepts Attempts an explanation / argument but often general coupled with assertion, description / narrative (2) Adequate application of sources to the question without ability to discriminate between them Points made about the importance of sources in the context of the period will often be little more than assertions (12–13) Level VI Use of relevant evidence will be limited; there will be much irrelevance and inaccuracy Answers may have little organisation or structure; weak use of English and poor organisation Footnotes should they appear may be poorly used. Bibliography may be inappropriate (1) Very little understanding of key concepts Limited explanation, mainly assertion, description / narrative (1) Weak application of sources to the question Weak understanding of the importance of sources in their context (6–11) Level VII No relevant or accurate knowledge Very poor use of English No footnotes or bibliography (0) No understanding of key concepts No explanation (0) Poor ability at using the sources Poor awareness

44  1. Comprehension Candidates must understand the thrust of the historians’ views. They should be able to see which views are similar to each other and which differ.   2. Interpretation. They must be able to see how the views are relevant to the key issue.   3. Evaluation. They should be able to offer a supported judgement about the interpretations based on contextual knowledge which leads to an overall judgement about the key issue.   4. Synthesis – candidates should be able to bring together relevant information from different passages and combine these with their own knowledge to offer sustained support for overall (synoptic) judgement 

45  Footnotes  Should be numbered and arranged at the bottom of each side (not at the end). They should not be used as a means of working in added content or description but merely to provide the reference for a source.  Use Microsoft Word footnoting system – if not in italics to differentiate between text and footnote.  In following form  A.J.P.Taylor, Bismarck, London, 1958 p.125   Bibliographies  These should be established in the same format as footnotes but listed at the end of the work.  Heydrich “Wannsee Conference Notes” in Noakes and Pridham Nazism vol III

46 TaskDoneChecked Are there at least ten sources evident within the piece? - Is there a balance of sources – primary secondary? - Is there a balance of argument within the sources? - Are they of differing provenance? Is it about the subject matter concerned? Has it used evaluative vocabulary? -Comparatives – ‘alternatively’, ‘conversely’, ‘however’, ‘nonetheless’, -Words to indicate judgement – ‘implies’, ‘substantially’ -Words of intensity and extent – ‘primarily’, ‘principally’, ‘marginally’, ‘significantly’ Is the paragraph structure clear? – Introductory sentence, a minimum of two sides to an argument, resolved in an intermediate conclusion at the end. Is there clear evaluation of each of the sources? Are the Interpretations synthesised with own knowledge? Is there clear evidence of corroboration between the sources used? Is the paragraph structure clear – containing intermediate conclusions in each case? Are the footnotes clear, appropriate and placed at the bottom of the relevant pages Is there a clearly arranged bibliography at the end of the piece? Is there a Judgement at the end? -Is it nuanced? -Is it sophisticated? -Is it clear? -Does it follow from the rest of the essay? What mark would it receive for: -AO2a -AO1a -AO1b Is the answer double-spaced? Is the answer printed single-sided?

47 DateTitle of WorkAuthor(s)P/SView or OpinionEvaluation of Utility Location

48 DateTitle of WorkAuthor(s)P/SView or OpinionEvaluation of Utility Location 10/1/1 2 Hitler’s Willing ExecutionersGoldhagenSClearly intentionalistQuestionable given narrow focus and criticisms levelled by others (Browning) Hist Library Notes in my file

49 Interest Available Useful Comprehend Evaluate Comfortable Fluent Discursive Synthesis Cogent Marking Resilience Scholarship and Achievement

50 DEBATING

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52 Where did power lie in Fascist Italy? Was Benito Mussolini an all- powerful dictator who ruled alone? Was he merely the figurehead of the Fascist movement? Did the Italian elite maintain their power over Mussolini?

53 Where did the power lie? Mussolini PNFElite

54  Using pp in Hite and Hinton suggest what the extreme reasons might be at either end and then where the other views are on the continuum.  Do any not fit neatly into the pattern? Why not?

55 Interest Available Useful Comprehend Evaluate Comfortable Fluent Discursive Synthesis Cogent Marking Resilience Scholarship and Achievement

56 WRITING

57  Comprehension  Interpretation  Evaluation  Synthesis

58 Interest Available Useful Comprehend Evaluate Comfortable Fluent Discursive Synthesis Cogent Marking Resilience Scholarship and Achievement

59 REVIEWING

60 Marking Grid TaskDone/Standard Is the answer led by the interpretations? Is it about the subject matter concerned? Has it used evaluative vocabulary? -Comparatives – ‘alternatively’, ‘conversely’, ‘however’, ‘nonetheless’, -Words to indicate judgement – ‘implies’, ‘substantially’ -Words of intensity and extent – ‘primarily’, ‘principally’, ‘marginally’, ‘significantly’ Is the paragraph structure clear? – Introductory sentence, a minimum of two sides to an argument, resolved in an intermediate conclusion at the end. Is there clear exemplification for each statement? Are the Interpretations synthesised with own knowledge? Is there clear evidence of corroboration between the Interpretations? Is there a Judgement at the end? -Is it nuanced? -Is it sophisticated? -Is it clear? -Does it follow from the rest of the essay?

61 Interest Available Useful Comprehend Evaluate Comfortable Fluent Discursive Synthesis Cogent Marking Resilience Scholarship and Achievement

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63 Voracious readers Independent thinkers Critical analysts Cogent writers Coherent writers Evaluators of evidence Convincing Debaters Reflective thinkers Good listeners

64  Independence of thought  Intellectual adaptability and flexibility.  Serious and mature about learning.  Able to ‘gut an argument’ and synthesise.  How might we facilitate those qualities?

65  Philip Hensher – “Even your pet rabbit could pass an A-level”  Identify the structure of the argument  What are the flaws and assumptions?  What are the strengths and weaknesses?  Could you construct a reasoned counter- argument?


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