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Hub Webinar Teaching the new primary curriculum: what will good practice look like? Julia Stead -------------------------------------------------- The.

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Presentation on theme: "Hub Webinar Teaching the new primary curriculum: what will good practice look like? Julia Stead -------------------------------------------------- The."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hub Webinar Teaching the new primary curriculum: what will good practice look like? Julia Stead The webinar slides can be downloaded and printed from: Do your colleagues need to use the Hub? Your subscription includes 6 log-ins. Make sure you’re using them all. For help call the Hub Line and speak to our friendly team!

2 Overview Our main concerns about the new curriculum Strategies to help Hang on... this could be great! Making the positives about the new curriculum work for us In summary... Question time

3 Your views What’s your biggest concern about the introduction of the new curriculum? What are you most looking forward to?

4 The Challenges of a New Curriculum 1. More challenging content for pupils. History Historical methodology reduced, and more factual learning is required. In KS2, the Stone Age, Romans, Anglo Saxons and Vikings are all now required. Numeracy Year 3: Add and subtract fractions with common denominators (before: Identification, reading and writing fractions). Literacy Year 6: Use semicolons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between independent clauses (before: Use punctuation to clarify meaning in complex sentences).

5 Strategies to help 1. More challenging content for pupils. Present content positively: excite the children rather than intimidate them. Respond to children’s interests to make the harder content engaging and relevant to their learning needs. Well thought-out resources to deliver the objectives clearly and exactly. It will take time to work from the lower years up.

6 The Challenges of a New Curriculum 2. The need to upskill.

7 Strategies to help 2. The need to upskill. Capitalise on staff strengths. Use subject coordinators in school – advice, INSET, resources, observing them at work. Attend cluster meetings with specialists and coordinators. Invest in yourself – online, books. Redesign teaching timetable/class structures to play to your school’s staff strengths.

8 The Challenges of a New Curriculum 3. Assessment No levels: Language Showing progression Accountability

9 Strategies to help 3. Assessment Common language, developed as a team through INSET or regular staff meetings. Effective moderation discussions. What are neighbouring schools doing? Wait for government’s ideas of good practice. What data will you record? What proforma will teachers use? How will whole-school data be collected and presented? Baseline data in each year group to show progression.

10 The Challenges of a New Curriculum 4. The need for time to digest and comprehend the changes Where do we find the time? Resources to help us? Hitting the ground running. Rolling ball syndrome!

11 Strategies to help 4. The need for time to digest and comprehend the changes Find concise and succinct resources. Lots available – work smart. Staff meetings provided to discuss and thrash out pinpointed issues to do with your school. Timeframe – timetable of what needs to be achieved and by when. Preparation rather than reactive meetings – less stress, better teacher confidence and more efficient use of time. Far better for students’ learning.

12 It’s going to be great 1. Some freedom! New objectives = chance to redesign. New topics that you can develop and take your own way. Assessment freedom from levels. Greater knowledge of your children as whole beings. A possible change of year groups? Starting from scratch may as well be done in a different year group!

13 It’s going to be great! 2. A chance for positive change Redesign your school’s vision. Chance for cohesive design of your curriculum. Change of schemes – more tailored teaching. New ideas from people starting things for the first time – all learning new things together. Finding new interests yourself. A change is as good as a rest.

14 It’s going to be great 3. A great excuse to… Spend your coordinator budget on new and exciting resources. Share practice and see others at work. De-clutter. Embrace a new era. Take some risks.

15 In summary... Challenges can be overcome, but it will take time and investment. Opportunities for personal and whole-school development, freedoms and improvement. A collection of teachers’ heads is better than one.

16 Hub Webinar Questions & Answers Read Julia’s article on the new curriculum at primary-curriculum-challenges-and-opportunitieshttp://www.optimus-education.com/new- primary-curriculum-challenges-and-opportunities Follow us on Download this presentation from

17 Effective Primary Assessment after Levels 18 th June 2014, Birmingham or 21 st May 2014, London DfE Update: Clarify the reforms to primary assessment and accountability Case studies: Take away best practice for implementing a new assessment framework National Curriculum: Plan your new assessment system in light of the new National Curriculum Consistent teacher assessment: Ensure that all teacher assessments are accurate and consistent Speakers include: Dame Alison Peacock, Executive Headteacher, The Wroxham School Caroline Barker, Policy Lead for National Curriculum Assessment, Department for Education Michael Tidd, Head of Year, Vale School, Worthing


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