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The Children’s Learning Institute University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston.

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1 The Children’s Learning Institute University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston

2 Our Project Develop and implement a kindergarten and first grade vocabulary curriculum. Three year grant federally funded by the Institute of Education Sciences. Development and field testing took place in a few Houston Independent School District elementary schools. 2Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

3 Why A Vocabulary Curriculum? Vocabulary is one of the five critical components of effective reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel. When readers fail to grasp the meaning of the individual words they read, their comprehension of texts is compromised. The single best predictor of how well a reader can understand text is that reader’s general vocabulary (Anderson & Freebody, 1981). 3Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

4 70 Percent Known Once when I was a yoder, my tomly and I were mayle in line to buy mott for the Blimblat. Finally, there was only one plam between us and the mott munt. The plam made a big ampler on me. There were eight utzs, all probably ord the age of 12. You could tell tures did not have a lot of willen. Their pard were not yanker, but tures were clean. The utzs were wll- matter, all of them mayle in line, two-by-two zors potent holding zibits. Tures were telly temering about the plums, fonts, and other yoks tures would wint that noster. 4Copyright © 2008 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

5 80 Percent Known Once when I was a yoder, my tomly and I were mayle in line to buy mott for the Blimblat. Finally, there was only one plam between us and the mott counter. The plam made a big impression on me. There were eight utzs, all probably under the age of 12. You could tell meyle did not have a lot of willen. Their pard were not yanker, but tures were clean. The utzs were well-behaved, all of them mayle in line, two-by- two behind their potent holding zibits. Tures were excitedly temering about the plums, fonts, and other acts tures would see that night. 5Copyright © 2008 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

6 93 Percent Known Once when I was a teenager, my tomly and I were standing in line to buy mott for the circus. Finally, there was only one plam between us and the mott counter. The plam made a big impression on me. There were eight utzs, all probably under the age of 12. You could tell they did not have a lot of money. Their clothes were not expensive, but they were clean. The utzs were well-behaved, all of them mayle in line, two-by-two behind their parents holding hands. They were excitedly jabbering about the clowns, fonts, and other acts tures would see that night. 6Copyright © 2008 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

7 Why A Vocabulary Curriculum? (con’t.) Knowledge about words is more a function of experience than of direct teaching. But, direct teaching can build vocabulary knowledge. Vocabulary instruction should occur frequently and over time, with teachers continually revisiting and reinforcing the meanings of words previously introduced. 7Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

8 Vocabulary Instruction ….Readers who do not know 90% of the words are not likely to comprehend the passage well, and will now be further behind on two fronts: they missed the opportunity to learn the content of the text and the opportunity to learn more words. Hirsch, E. D., Jr. Reading Comprehension Requires Knowledge of Words and the World. American Educator, page 16. Spring 2006. 8Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

9 What Words Should Be Taught? Research has demonstrated that it matters not only that vocabulary instruction is provided, but that the right words are taught. This curriculum teaches words that fit two basic criteria. We use words: – That may be familiar to students, but that they rarely use independently in speaking and writing. – That students are likely to encounter in books they read or hear in their first years at school (highly useful words). 9Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

10 10Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Variety of levels Read more Learn words from context Vocabulary journals Provide audio books Storytelling Puns & riddles Word games Read and discuss Use context clues Efficient dictionary use Use word parts Definitions Active word learning Contextual information Teach with discussions Direct Teaching of Specific Words Components of Effective Vocabulary Instruction Teaching and Modeling Independent Word Learning Strategies Wide Reading High-Quality Oral Language Word Consciousness

11 Lessons on Lesson Design 11Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

12 12 About Daily Lessons Daily lessons are designed to take from 15 to 30 minutes to teach. Lesson length will vary from lesson to lesson and from teacher to teacher. Teachers may choose to take longer with some lessons than others. Some days teachers may choose not to teach certain parts of that day’s lesson. Try to teach vocabulary lessons during the same period each day and avoid skipping lessons. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

13 13 Where to teach BVER vocabulary lessons are designed to be taught with students gathered on a comfortable carpet on the floor around the teacher. The teacher needs a pocket chart or stand to hold materials, and chart paper or a whiteboard or blackboard to work with for some lessons. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

14 Promote Active Word Learning Students remember more when they relate words to something they know. Have discussions where students put meanings in their own words. Make classroom graphic organizers. Talk about words!!! Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

15 Our Guiding Principles for Lesson Development High quality children’s literature (read aloud to the class) provides words to be taught. One book is used per week. Teach 3 or 4 words a day, for a total of 15 words a week. Lessons should be quick (about 20-30 minutes a day). Word meanings are taught explicitly. 15Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

16 Guiding Principles for Lesson Development (con’t.) Lessons are guided by a wide range of instructional strategies appropriate for each grade level. Use of new vocabulary in student writing is encouraged and lessons frequently include a student writing component. Learning is active, with students repeatedly using the words in different contexts and ways. Lessons are highly interactive and fun. 16Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

17 Guiding Principles for Development of Materials Materials must: – Be easy and intuitive for teachers to use. – Support explicit instruction and a range of types of active learning and interaction. – Be visually engaging and aesthetically appealing. 17Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

18 LESSON REVIEW Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston18

19 Authentic Literature Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston19 Intro book Kindergarten Books First Grade Books

20 20 Consistent Daily Lesson Format Daily lessons consist of all or most of the following components. 1.Vocabulary Review 2.Chip’s Journal 3.Introduce / Review Book 4.Introduce New Vocabulary 5.Read Book Aloud 6.Teach New Vocabulary 7.Closing Activity Lesson-at-a-Glance Cards for convenient delivery of the first five components Word Logs and Closing Cards for the remainder of lesson. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

21 21 Quick Vocabulary Review Most days of instruction in the BVER program include a Vocabulary Review section early in the lesson. Words reviewed during lesson 1 are from the previous week. Words reviewed during lessons 2-5 are from the previous lesson. The teacher determines which words need most review and re-teaching. The time the teacher chooses to take with vocabulary review can significantly impact the total length of the lesson. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

22 Our hook - Chip’s Journal Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston22 Gives students another experience with the words from the previous day. Chronicles Chip’s thoughts and adventures throughout the school year. Serves as a model for the kinds of writing students can do in their journals.

23 23 Introduce New Vocabulary Prior to the read aloud for a lesson, students quickly learn the new vocabulary words being taught that day. They learn and repeat both the words and their definitions and are reminded to listen for these words in the read aloud. A standard procedure for introducing words is provided for use with each new word. This procedure should be used for each new word each day. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

24 24 Introducing New Vocabulary 1.This word is _________. Can you say _______ with me? 2.Students repeat the word with you. 3.Good job! ____________ means (insert definition from the word log). Let’s say the definition together. 4.Students repeat the definition with you. 5.Good job! ____________ means (insert definition from the word log). Now, say our word with me one more time. 6.Students repeat the word with you. 7.Good job! Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

25 25 Thoughts about Read Alouds During lesson 1 the teacher reads the entire book. During lessons 2-5 a few pages are normally read which include the words for that lesson. The teacher asks short questions to insure students understand and are engaged with the story and to provide additional opportunities for use of the week’s vocabulary words. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

26 26 Teaching New Vocabulary For each word a review of the meaning of the word is provided, along with a brief activity to teach students the meaning of the word. The definition students learn and repeat is usually simpler than the deeper meaning conveyed while teaching the word. Each word is taught using a “Word Log.” Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

27 27 Another hook - Word Logs The Word Log serves as both a learning tool for students and a teaching tool for teachers. The front of the log shows the word, and the inside shows the word and its brief definition. roar growl loudly roar Front of Word Log Inside of Word Log Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

28 28 Using the Word Logs (cont.) The back of the Word Log provides teachers with instructions for reviewing and teaching the meaning of the word. Back of Word Log DAY 2 - WORD 3Week 3: The Loudest Roar Our last word today is roar. Roar means growl loudly. In the book it says, “Even though he was small, he knew he was the fiercest, most roaringest tiger in the whole world.” Roaringest isn’t a real word, but it means the same thing as roar. Have you heard a tiger roar? Where did you hear a tiger? (TV, zoo.) Can you show me what it sounded like? Students practice roaring like a tiger. Lions and tigers and other big cats are the animals that roar. We are going to look at some pictures and think about whether they show animals that roar. Activity: Examples and Non-Examples Show pictures of animals that roar and animals that don’t roar. If the animal can roar, students “roar.” Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

29 Vary Activity Types A variety of types of activities are used for teaching words. Specific procedures for the activity vary depending on the word. Detailed instructions are always provided. Some activity types include: 29Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Examples From Our Lives Multiple Meanings Examples and Non-Examples Practice Using the Word Make Connections Experience the Word Act Out the Word Word Forms Synonyms and Antonyms Graphic Organizers Word Associations Homonyms

30 Using Picture Cards Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston30 Pictures help teach some words. Provided in the lesson jacket with the book.

31 Using Discussion Students who don’t understand can learn by listening to classmates. Discussion can clarify misunderstandings. Students rehearse what they will say if called upon. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

32 Using Contextual Information Create sentences that contain new word. Use more than one new word in a sentence. Discuss meaning of same word in different sentences. Create a scenario. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

33 33 Redirection and Re-teaching Teachers should provide correction, redirection and additional practice using their best professional judgment based on their assessment of student understanding and needs. Spend more time with challenging words, and less time with words students grasp easily. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

34 34 Closing Activity – Making it personal Each lesson concludes with a summative or extension activity. The closing activity gives students additional experiences with the vocabulary words and provides another context for them to extend and refine their understanding of each word. Usually this activity involves either shared or independent writing. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

35 Student Writing Journal Page Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston35 Individual student journals. Prompt related to word or idea from book. Space for writing and drawing.

36 36 Reaching out to our homes Experience outside of school with new vocabulary words facilitates student learning. A Home Connection Book is provided each week to bring the BVER vocabulary words to life outside of the classroom. Each book informs families of the words students are learning that week, and provides a story using these words. Students are encouraged to keep the Home Connection Books at home for repeated readings with their families. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

37 37 Home Connection Stories Each page of the story includes some text the student may read, and discussion questions are provided. Simple games and activities are included. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

38 38 Encouraging Regular Use of Vocabulary Words: Chip’s Pond Children build their vocabularies through repeated exposure to new words, and by using new vocabulary in their speech and writing. Chip’s Pond will support awareness and use of the vocabulary words. It is part of a system to recognize students when they use the words that have been taught. Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

39 39 Chip’s Pond (cont.) Chip’s Pond may be introduced any time after the routines for daily lessons are well established. Students help Chip fill his pond by adding a stone to it each time they hear or use one of “Chip’s Words.” Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

40 Closing Dennis Ciancio, Principal Investigator of BVER project: Dennis.Ciancio@uth.tmc.edu Keith Millner, Manager of BVER project Keith.Millner@uth.tmc.edu Marguerite Held Marguerite.A.Held@uth.tmc.edu 40Copyright © 2010 Children’s Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston


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