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Understanding and Integrating Text Complexity in the classroom using the Common Core State Standards Diann Roberts N.B.C.T. ELA / RD Coordinator SDE of.

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Presentation on theme: "Understanding and Integrating Text Complexity in the classroom using the Common Core State Standards Diann Roberts N.B.C.T. ELA / RD Coordinator SDE of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Understanding and Integrating Text Complexity in the classroom using the Common Core State Standards Diann Roberts N.B.C.T. ELA / RD Coordinator SDE of Idaho

2 Understanding and Integrating Text Complexity in the classroom using the Common Core State Standards Please place dots on graph to show where you feel you are in regards to using the CCSS and text complexity to help students reach College and Career Readiness.

3 Beginning in the spring of 2009, Governors and state commissioners of education from 48 states, 2 territories and the District of Columbia committed to developing a common core of state K-12 English- language arts (ELA) and mathematics standards. The Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI) is a state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO).

4 A focus on college and career readiness Inclusion of the four strands of English Language Arts: ReadingK-12 Reading Foundational Skills K-5 Literacy in History/Social Studies Science, and Technical Subjects6-12 WritingK-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies Science, and Technical Subjects6-12 Speaking and Listening K-12 LanguageK-12

5 Note pages for your grade levels on chart

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7 Three appendices (the pieces of the puzzle) A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks C: Annotated student writing samples

8 Claim #1 – Students can read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational texts. Claim #2 – Students can produce effective and well-grounded writing for a range of purposes and audiences. Claim #3 – Students can employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. Claim #4 – Students can engage in research/inquiry to investigate topics, and to analyze, integrate, and present information. The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium Content Specifications for ELA is a bridge document linking the CCSS to the Smarter Balanced assessment claims and targets.

9 The benefits of an integrated literacy approach –educators have a shared responsibility for literacy instruction, regardless of discipline or content area. A focus on results rather than means – “the Standards leave room for teachers, curriculum developers, and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be addressed” Efficiencies of scale – common standards allow for greater collaboration among states in the areas of Professional development Resource development Teaching tools

10  Need increase in text complexity K-12, foster close reading of these texts, and perseverance, literacy owned across all content areas  Writing is primary, not secondary. Students should write about complex texts, not their summer vacation. Goal: foster fluent, flexible rhetorically agile writers  Creation and delivery of material orally highly valued as is collaboration with peers  Strategic use of digital resources, including research skills, is highly valued English Language Arts and Literacy: Core Concepts

11 Specifically, within reading standard #10: Anchor Standard: R.CCR.10Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. Example Grade-level Standard (6 th grade): RI.6.10By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

12 Sample Literacy Question: Pre-CCSS The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Have the students identify the different methods of removing warts that Tom and Huckleberry talk about. Discuss the charms that they say and the items (i.e. dead cats) they use. Ask students to devise their own charm to remove warts. Students could develop a method that would fit in the time of Tom Sawyer and a method that would incorporate items and words from current time. Boys played with dead cats and frogs, during Tom’s time. Are there cultural ideas or artifacts from the current time that could be used in the charm? Sample Literacy Question: CCSS The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Why does Tom hesitate to allow Ben to paint the fence? How are his sentences constructed to reflect that hesitation? What effect do Tom’s hesitations have on Ben?

13 Principal Leadership Article Read article as group: Determine way to read article: *all read silent *each read a page *divide up by Ahhs from article? Individual thoughts? Group comments? Text Complexity:

14 Text complexity is defined by: Qualitative Quantitative 1.Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. 2.Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. Reader and Task 3.Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment.

15 Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** K-1100L – 500L*1.0 – L – 790L2.0 – L – 980L3.0 – L – 1155L4.0 – L – 1305L4.6 – CCR1215L – 1355L4.8 – 12.0 Quantitative Measures Ranges for Text Complexity Grade Bands ** Taken from Accelerated Reader and the Common Core State Standards, available at the following URL: Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** K L – 790L2.0 – L – 980L3.0 – L – 1155L4.0 – L – 1305L4.6 – CCR1215L – 1355L4.8 – 12.0

16 Lexile Analyzer: AR BookFinder: Quantitative Measures Resources

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18 Rubric for Literary Text Rubric for Informational Text

19 The rubric for literary text and the rubric for informational text allow educators to evaluate the important elements of text that are often missed by computer software that tends to focus on more easily measured factors.

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22 Reader and Task Considerations Questions for Professional Reflection

23 Questions for Professional Reflection on Reader and Task Considerations : The questions provided in this resource are meant to spur teacher thought and reflection upon the text, students, and any tasks associated with the text.

24 Students who are college and career ready... The questions included here are largely open-ended questions without single, correct answers, but help educators to think through the implications of using a particular text in the classroom. Questions for Professional Reflection on Reader and Task Considerations :

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26 Step One:Identify the core understandings and key ideas of the text. Step Two:Start small to build confidence. Step Three:Target vocabulary and text structure. Step Four:Tackle tough sections head-on. Step Five:Create coherent sequences of text-dependent questions. Step Six:Identify the standards that are being addressed. Step Seven:Create the culminating assessment. Creating Text-Dependent Questions Step One:Identify the core understandings and key ideas of the text. Step Two:Start small to build confidence. Step Three:Target vocabulary and text structure. Step Four:Tackle tough sections head-on. Step Five:Create coherent sequences of text-dependent questions. Step Six:Identify the standards that are being addressed. Step Seven:Create the culminating assessment.

27 Text-Dependent Questions Can only be answered with evidence from the text. Can be literal (checking for understanding) but must also involve analysis, synthesis, evaluation. Focus on word, sentence, and paragraph, as well as larger ideas, themes, or events. Focus on difficult portions of text in order to enhance reading proficiency. Can also include prompts for writing and discussion questions.

28 Non-Examples and Examples Not Text-Dependent In “Casey at the Bat,” Casey strikes out. Describe a time when you failed at something. In “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” Dr. King discusses nonviolent protest. Discuss, in writing, a time when you wanted to fight against something that you felt was unfair. In “The Gettysburg Address” Lincoln says the nation is dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Why is equality an important value to promote? Text-Dependent What makes Casey’s experiences at bat humorous? What can you infer from King’s letter about the letter that he received? “The Gettysburg Address” mentions the year According to Lincoln’s speech, why is this year significant to the events described in the speech?

29 After reflecting upon all three legs of the text complexity model we can make a final recommendation of placement within a text and begin to document our thinking for future reference.

30 Readings on tables from Appendix B Table discussions How would you respond to the Sample Performance Task at the bottom of the reading?

31 Example of Placement

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33 Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** K-1100L – 500L*1.0 – L – 790L2.0 – L – 980L3.0 – L – 1155L4.0 – L – 1305L4.6 – CCR1215L – 1355L4.8 – 12.0 Lexile Text Measure: 870L ATOS Book Level: 5.6

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35 Recommended Placement Form Template for Text Complexity Analysis and Recommended Placement Form : The one-page template provides an opportunity to record the thinking involved in recommending the placement of a specific text into a text complexity band. Keeping a record of such analysis and thinking might be useful documentation in the case that any questions arise in the future.

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37 Text Complexity Analysis Bookmarks

38 Literey Text Complexity Analysis Bookmarks

39 Common Core Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects Getting Started e/gettingStarted.htm Deconstructed Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts e/ccss.htm

40 Common Core Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects What’s on the Test: Smarter-Balanced Assessment Consortium e/onTest.htm What does this look like in the classroom? – Instructional materials & Resources e/classroom.htm

41 frameworkshttp://parcconline.org/parcc-content- frameworks video-series/ Additional Resources for CCSS:


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