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1 What are the Common Core State Standards? English Language Arts Mathematics

2  College and Career Readiness (CCR) Anchor Standards  Broad set of Standards that list the skills needed to be college and career ready  Grade level Standards  Grade specific standards that provide what students should know and be able to do by the end of each grade level English Language Arts Standards

3  p/acre/ela.html p/acre/ela.html English Language Arts Standards Unpacked

4  Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects K–5  College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading  Reading Standards for Literature K–5  Reading Standards for Informational Text K–5  Reading Standards: Foundational Skills K–5  College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing  Writing Standards K–5  College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening  Speaking and Listening Standards K–5  College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language  Language Standards K–5  Language Progressive Skills, by Grade  Standard 10: Range, Quality, and Complexity of Student Reading K-5  Staying on Topic Within a Grade and Across Grades English Language Arts Standards K – 5

5  Reading Standards for Literature 6–12  Reading Standards for Informational Text 6–12  College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing 41  Writing Standards 6–12  College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening  Speaking and Listening Standards 6–12  College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language  Language Standards 6–12  Language Progressive Skills, by Grade  Standard 10: Range, Quality, and Complexity of Student Reading 6–12 English Language Arts Standards 6 – 12

6  College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading  Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies 6–12  Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects 6–12  College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing  Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects 6–12 Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

7 7 Shift #1: Building Knowledge Through Content-Rich Nonfiction and Informational Texts

8 Content Shift #1 Content-Rich Nonfiction 50/50 balance K-5 70/30 in grades 9-12 Students learning to read should exercise their ability to comprehend complex text through read-aloud texts. In grades 2+, students begin reading more complex texts, consolidating the foundational skills with reading comprehension. Reading aloud texts that are well-above grade level should be done throughout K-5 and beyond.

9 Building Knowledge Through Content-Rich Nonfiction: Why? Students are required to read very little informational text in elementary and middle school. Non-fiction makes up the vast majority of required reading in college/workplace. Informational text is harder for students to comprehend than narrative text. Supports students learning how to read different types of informational text

10 Content Shift #1 Sequencing Texts to Build Knowledge Not random reading Literacy in social studies/history, science, technical subjects, and the arts is embedded Resources Page 33 in the CCSS for ELA/Literacy – The Human Body

11 11 Shift #2: Reading, Writing and Speaking Grounded in Evidence From Text, Both Literary and Informational

12 Reading, Writing and Speaking Grounded in Evidence from Text: Why? 12 Ability to cite evidence differentiates strong from weak student performance on NAEP Being able to locate and deploy evidence are hallmarks of strong readers and writers Evidence is a major emphasis of the ELA Standards: Reading Standard 1, Writing Standard 9, Speaking and Listening standards 2, 3 and 4, all focus on the gathering, evaluating and presenting of evidence from text. Most college and workplace writing requires evidence.

13 One hot summer's day a famished fox was strolling through an orchard until he came to clusters of grapes just ripening on a trellised vine. "Just the thing to quench my thirst," quoth he. Drawing back a few paces, he took a run and a jump, and just missed the bunch. His mouth was watering and he could feel gnawing hunger pains. Again and again he tried after the tempting morsel, but at last had to give up. Complex One hot summer's day a famished fox was strolling through an orchard until he came to clusters of grapes just ripening on a trellised vine. "Just the thing to quench my thirst," quoth he. Drawing back a few paces, he took a run and a jump, and just missed the bunch. His mouth was watering and he could feel gnawing hunger pains. Again and again he tried after the tempting morsel, but at last had to give up. Complex Once a fox walked through the woods. He came upon a grape orchard. There he found beautiful grapes hanging from a high branch. “Boy those sure would be tasty,” he thought to himself. He backed up and took a running start and jumped. He did not get high enough. Simple

14 What is right with “simplified” text?  Provides for scaffolding for ELL students, students with disabilities.  They can become a foundation for understanding complex text as long as students have the opportunity to read complex texts as well.  Gradated Text Collection – a collection of texts on a topic that advance in degrees of complexity. Some students may read simpler texts first, then move on to complex text (a form of instructional support).

15 What’s wrong with the simplified text approach?  Simplified usually means limited, restricted, and thin in meaning.  Academic vocabulary can only be learned from complex texts––by noticing how it works in texts, engaging with, thinking about, and discussing their more complex meanings with others.  Mature language skills needed for success in school and life can only be gained by working with demanding materials.  No evidence that struggling readers—especially at middle and high school--catch up by gradually increasing the complexity of simpler texts.

16 High school students read an excerpt of James D. Watson’s The Double Helix and respond to the following: James Watson used time away from his laboratory and a set of models similar to preschool toys to help him solve the puzzle of DNA. In an essay discuss how play and relaxation help promote clear thinking and problem solving. Sample Informational Text Assessment Question: Pre-Common Core Standards

17 Content Shift #2 17 In “Casey at the Bat,” Casey strikes out. Describe a time when you failed at something. In “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” Dr. King discusses nonviolent protest. Discuss, in writing, a time when you wanted to fight against something that you felt was unfair. In “The Gettysburg Address” Lincoln says the nation is dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Why is equality an important value to promote? What makes Casey’s experiences at bat humorous? What can you infer from King’s letter about the letter that he received? “The Gettysburg Address” mentions the year According to Lincoln’s speech, why is this year significant to the events described in the speech? Not Text-DependentText-Dependent Text-Dependent Questions

18 From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer  Have the students identify the different methods of removing warts that Tom and Huckleberry talk about. Discuss the charms that they say and the items (i.e. dead cats) they use. Ask students to devise their own charm to remove warts. Students could develop a method that would fit in the time of Tom Sawyer and a method that would incorporate items and words from current time. Boys played with dead cats and frogs, during Tom’s time. Are there cultural ideas or artifacts from the current time that could be used in the charm? Sample Literary Question: Pre-Common Core Standards

19 Sample Text Dependent Question: Common Core Standards From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Why does Tom hesitate to allow Ben to paint the fence? How does Twain construct his sentences to reflect that hesitation? What effect do Tom’s hesitations have on Ben?

20 20 Shift #3:Regular Practice with Complex Text and Its Academic Vocabulary

21 Regular Practice With Complex text and Its Academic Vocabulary: Why? Gap between complexity of college and high school texts is huge. What students can read, in terms of complexity is greatest predictor of success in college (ACT study). Too many students are reading at too low a level. (<50% of graduates can read sufficiently complex texts). Standards include a staircase of increasing text complexity from elementary through high school. Standards also focus on building general academic vocabulary so critical to comprehension. Gap between complexity of college and high school texts is huge. What students can read, in terms of complexity is greatest predictor of success in college (ACT study). Too many students are reading at too low a level. (<50% of graduates can read sufficiently complex texts). Standards include a staircase of increasing text complexity from elementary through high school. Standards also focus on building general academic vocabulary so critical to comprehension.

22 What are the Features of Complex Text? 22 Subtle and/or frequent transitions Multiple and/or subtle themes and purposes Density of information Unfamiliar settings, topics or events Lack of repetition, overlap or similarity in words and sentences Complex sentences Uncommon vocabulary Lack of words, sentences or paragraphs that review or pull things together for the student Longer paragraphs Any text structure which is less narrative and/or mixes structures

23 Overview of Text Complexity Qualitative Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. Q uantitativ e Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. Reader and Task Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment. 23 Text complexity is defined by:

24 Close Analytic Reading Requires prompting students with questions to unpack unique complexity of any text so students learn to read complex text independently and proficiently. Not teacher "think aloud“. Virtually every standard is activated during the course of every close analytic reading exemplar through the use of text dependent questions. Text dependent questions require text-based answers – evidence. Requires prompting students with questions to unpack unique complexity of any text so students learn to read complex text independently and proficiently. Not teacher "think aloud“. Virtually every standard is activated during the course of every close analytic reading exemplar through the use of text dependent questions. Text dependent questions require text-based answers – evidence.

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26 Anchor Standards 26

27 Key Ideas and Details 1.Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central idea or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. 27

28 Craft and Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 28

29 Craft and Structure 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. 29

30 Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. 30

31 Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10.Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 31

32 Unpacking the Standards Cognitive Demand and Rigor

33 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge and Bloom’s Taxonomy The CCSS standards incorporate Webb’s Depth of Knowledge and Bloom’s Taxonomy. The cognitive demand of the standards rises across the grades. 33

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35 The “Demands” of the Standards The cognitive demand of the standards incorporates Bloom’s Taxonomy and Webb’s Depth of Knowledge. How is this accomplished? The standards “ramp up” the demands made on student thinking. 35

36  In your group, sequence the standards by grade level.  Prepare to share out.

37 Kindergarten1 st Grade2 nd Grade3 rd Grade READING STANDARDS FOR LITERATURE, Key Ideas and Details 2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. 2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. 2. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. 2. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 37

38 3 rd Grade4 th Grade5 th Grade6th Grade 2. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. 2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. 2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. 38

39 7 th Grade8 th Grade 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. 39

40 9 th -10 th Grade11 th -12 th Grade 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. 2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. 40

41 Structure of the Standards Four Strands: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, Language Each strand has Science/technology and social studies standards for literacy Text complexity standards are listed by grade “bands”: K-1, 2- 3, 4-5, 6-8, 9-10, 11-12, CCR – College and Career Ready) Strand Anchor Standard Grade- Specific Standard 41

42 Identify the Standard RI StrandGrade Standard Number 42

43 Identify the Standard W b StrandGrades Standard Number 43

44 Activity Name the 44

45 Scaffolding Complex Text The standards require that students read appropriately complex text at each grade level – independently (Standard 10). However there are many ways to scaffold student learning as they meet the standard: Multiple readings Read Aloud Chunking text (a little at a time) Provide support while reading, rather than before.

46 46 Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: Key Shifts

47 CCSSM stands for Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

48 Math Standards  Standards  Define what students should understand and be able to do  Clusters  Summarize groups of related standards. Note: Standards from different clusters may sometimes be closely related, because mathematics is a connected subject  Domains  Larger groups of related standards. Standards from different domains may sometimes be closely related

49 Use appropriate tools strategically Attend to precision Look for and make sense of structure Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning Standards for Mathematical Practice Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them Reason abstractly and quantitatively Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others Model with mathematics 49

50 Common Core Format Domains are large groups of related standards. Standards from different domains may sometimes be closely related. Look for the name with the code number on it for a Domain.

51 Common Core Format Clusters are groups of related standards. Standards from different clusters may sometimes be closely related, because mathematics is a connected subject. Clusters appear inside domains.

52 Common Core Format Standards define what students should be able to understand and be able to do – part of a cluster.

53 Common Core Format High School Conceptual Category Domain Cluster Standards K-8 Grade Domain Cluster Standards (There are no preK Common Core Standards)

54 Grade Level Overview

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56 Format of K-8 Standards

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58 Format of High School

59 Common Core - Domain  Domains are overarching big ideas that connect topics across the grades  Descriptions of the mathematical content to be learned elaborated through clusters and standards

60 Common Core - Standards  Standards are content statements. An example content statement is: “ Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions.”  Progressions of increasing complexity from grade to grade

61 Common Core - Clusters  May appear in multiple grade levels in the K-8 Common Core. There is increasing development as the grade levels progress  What students should know and be able to do at each grade level  Reflect both mathematical understandings and skills, which are equally important

62 High School Conceptual Categories  The big ideas that connect mathematics across high school – such as Functions or Probability and Statistics  A progression of increasing complexity  Description of mathematical content to be learned elaborated through domains, clusters, and standards

63 High School Pathways  The CCSSM Model Pathways are two models that organize the CCSSM into coherent, rigorous courses  The CCSSM Model Pathways are NOT required. The two sequences are examples, not mandates

64 High School Pathways  Four years of mathematics:  One course in each of the first two years  Followed by two options for year three and a variety of relevant courses for year four  Course descriptions  Define what is covered in a course  Are not prescriptions for the curriculum or pedagogy

65 High School Pathways  Pathway A: Consists of two algebra courses and a geometry course, with some data, probability and statistics infused throughout each (traditional)  Pathway B: Typically seen internationally that consists of a sequence of 3 courses each of which treats aspects of algebra, geometry and data, probability, and statistics.

66 Mathematics: 3 Shifts 66 Focus: Focus strongly where the standards focus.

67 Shift #1: Focus Strongly where the Standards Focus Significantly narrow the scope of content and deepen how time and energy is spent in the math classroom. Focus deeply on what is emphasized in the standards, so that students gain strong foundations. 67

68 K 12 Number and Operations Measurement and Geometry Algebra and Functions Statistics and Probability Traditional U.S. Approach 68

69 Focusing Attention Within Number and Operations Operations and Algebraic Thinking Expressions and Equations Algebra →→ Number and Operations— Base Ten → The Number System → Number and Operations— Fractions → K High School 69

70 Grade Focus Areas in Support of Rich Instruction and Expectations of Fluency and Conceptual Understanding K–2 Addition and subtraction – concepts, skills, and problem solving and place value 3–5 Multiplication and division of whole numbers and fractions – concepts, skills, and problem solving 6 Ratios and proportional reasoning; early expressions and equations 7 Ratios and proportional reasoning; arithmetic of rational numbers 8 Linear algebra Key Areas of Focus in Mathematics 70

71 71 Mathematics: 3 Shifts Focus: Focus strongly where the standards focus. Coherence: Think across grades, and link to major topics

72 Shift #2: Coherence: Think Across Grades, and Link to Major Topics Within Grades Carefully connect the learning within and across grades so that students can build new understanding on foundations built in previous years. Begin to count on solid conceptual understanding of core content and build on it. Each standard is not a new event, but an extension of previous learning. 72

73 Coherence: Think Across Grades Example: Fractions “The coherence and sequential nature of mathematics dictate the foundational skills that are necessary for the learning of algebra. The most important foundational skill not presently developed appears to be proficiency with fractions (including decimals, percents, and negative fractions). The teaching of fractions must be acknowledged as critically important and improved before an increase in student achievement in algebra can be expected.” Final Report of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel (2008, p. 18)

74 Coherence: Link to Major Topics Within Grades Example: Data Representation Standard 3.MD.3 74

75 Example: Geometric Measurement 3.MD, third cluster Coherence: Link to Major Topics Within Grades

76 76 Mathematics: 3 Shifts 1.Focus: Focus strongly where the standards focus. 2.Coherence: Think across grades, and link to major topics 3.Rigor: In major topics, pursue conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application

77 The CCSSM require a balance of:  Solid conceptual understanding  Procedural skill and fluency  Application of skills in problem solving situations Pursuit of all threes requires equal intensity in time, activities, and resources. Shift #3: Rigor: In Major Topics, Pursue Conceptual Understanding, Procedural Skill and Fluency, and Application

78 Required Fluencies in K-6 78 GradeStandardRequired Fluency KK.OA.5Add/subtract within 5 11.OA.6Add/subtract within OA.2 2.NBT.5 Add/subtract within 20 (know single-digit sums from memory) Add/subtract within OA.7 3.NBT.2 Multiply/divide within 100 (know single-digit products from memory) Add/subtract within NBT.4Add/subtract within 1,000, NBT.5Multi-digit multiplication 66.NS.2,3 Multi-digit division Multi-digit decimal operations

79 Standards for Mathematical Practice 79

80 You have just purchased an expensive Grecian urn and asked the dealer to ship it to your house. He picks up a hammer, shatters it into pieces, and explains that he will send one piece a day in an envelope for the next year. You object; he says “don’t worry, I’ll make sure that you get every single piece, and the markings are clear, so you’ll be able to glue them all back together. I’ve got it covered.” Absurd, no? But this is the way many school systems require teachers to deliver mathematics to their students; one piece (i.e. one standard) at a time. They promise their customers (the taxpayers) that by the end of the year they will have “covered” the standards. ~Excerpt from The Structure is the Standards Phil Daro, Bill McCallum, Jason Zimba 80

81 Mathematics Domains

82 Let’s look at the Math Standards

83 83 Reflecting on the Shifts for Mathematics

84 How does Common Core apply to Special Education?

85 Instruction of Students with Disabilities Students with disabilities need to meet high academic standards and to fully demonstrate their conceptual and procedural knowledge and skills in mathematics, reading, writing, speaking and listening (English language arts), their instruction must incorporate supports and accommodations, including: Supports and related services designed to meet the unique needs of these students and to enable their access to the general education curriculum (IDEA 34 CFR §300.34, 2004). An Individualized Education Program (IEP) which includes annual goals aligned with and chosen to facilitate their attainment of grade-level academic standards. Teachers and specialized instructional support personnel who are prepared and qualified to deliver high-quality, evidence- based, individualized instruction and support services

86 Culture of High Expectations for All Students Instructional accommodations (Thompson, Morse, Sharpe & Hall, 2005) ―changes in materials or procedures― which do not change the standards but allow students to learn within the framework of the Common Core. Assistive technology devices and services to ensure access to the general education curriculum and the Common Core State Standards. Success in the general curriculum for students with disabilities, as appropriate, may be provided through additional supports and services. Instructional supports for learning― based on the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) ―which foster student engagement by presenting information in multiple ways and allowing for diverse avenues of action and expression

87 Upcoming Student Progression Plan H. Special Provisions for SWDs For SWDs who exhibit a substantial deficiency in reading skills Intensive Interventions as specified in the CRRP. Students with disabilities are required to the same instructional time as their non- disabled peers. EOC Waiver SWD in a VE model should have no more than two grade levels and one subject area within a single instructional block in order to ensure fidelity of instruction in core curriculum.

88 Fewer, Clearer, Higher Common Core State Standards: Implications for Students Receiving Special Education Services  Rising Above the Gathering Storm Revisited: Rapidly Approaching Category  US quickly losing its competitive edge in the world  Original report indicated the same thing  IDEA Reauthorization Committee  Review and authorization of the IDEA is needed to move to the next step of providing special education and related services to children with disabilities to improve and increase educational achievement. International Center for Leadership in Education White Paper February 2011

89 International Center for Leadership in Education Initial Stages of Transition from State Standards to Common Core State Standards  Focusing on the needs exceptional students will benefit all students Fewer, Clearer, Higher Common Core State Standards: Implications for Students Receiving Special Education Services -continued

90 FIVE key elements that schools must address to support the achievement of students receiving special education services:  Ownership – students receiving special education services responsibility of all  High Expectations – understanding by administrators, faculty, and students that all students will be challenged and expected to perform to the best of their ability.  Intervention Systems – policies, procedures, and protocols to ensure that struggling learners meet academic and/or behavioral expectations as measured by improved performance.  Inclusion/Collaborative Teaching – students receiving special education services included in general education and have access to both content and special education expertise.  Organization/Professional Development – programs for struggling learners depend on alignment of and access to standards-based curriculum, instruction, and assessment and data-driven professional development to support teaches in achieving goals. International Center for Leadership in Education Fewer, Clearer, Higher Common Core State Standards: Implications for Students Receiving Special Education Services -continued

91 Resources

92 Resources   _Core_Standards.aspx _Core_Standards.aspx   state-standards-resources state-standards-resources  standards/common-core.aspx standards/common-core.aspx

93 93 12:00-1:00

94 New Generation Sunshine State Standards Versus Common Core State Standards Curriculum Programs

95 Florida Transitions to Common Core State Standards NGSSS  Standards-based instruction  Test item specifications guide development of curriculum maps  Focus mini-assessments aligned to individual benchmarks and used to monitor student progress  Teaching benchmarks in isolation results in long lists of tasks to master CCSS  Standards-based instruction facilitated by learning goals  Big ideas and learning goals guide the development of curriculum maps  Learning progressions or scales describe expectations for student progress in attaining the learning goals  Assessments used to monitor student progress are aligned directly to the learning progressions or scales  Teaching big ideas narrows the focus and allows students to delve deeper for a greater depth of understanding

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97 Pacing Guides  Staff within the core content areas of Language Arts/Reading, Mathematics, and Science, has aligned State Standards and essential curricular content to instructional materials and resources.  Each discipline has developed content-specific pacing guides which set expectations for student performance at K-12 levels, for the school year.

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99 Elementary Core Reading Curriculum

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101 MaterialsPurpose Phonics LibraryProvides practice for application of phonics and high frequency words Theme Skills TestEvaluate discrete reading and language arts skills through a multiple choice format Integrated Theme Skills Test Measures students’ use of comprehension skills and strategies along with word skills, spelling, grammar and writing Vocabulary ReadersHelps readers below grade levels access core anthology by using the same vocabulary in selection Houghton Mifflin Materials

102 MaterialsPurpose Classroom Management Handbook Timesaving management tips, assignable daily activities for small and large groups, weekly assignment planners, and helpful blackline masters. *Small Group Independent Activities Kit Organizes center and group rotations, student practice for anthology section, ideas on how to differentiate and assistance to help students understand classroom routines *Classroom Ready- Made Manipulatives Kit Games for practicing reading skills to be done in small groups or in centers Houghton Mifflin Materials

103 MaterialsPurpose Instruction Transparencies/ Masters and Strategy Posters Includes graphic organizers, providing additional practice in vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, writing, etc. Teacher’s Resource Blackline Masters Collection of blackline masters that have instructional and practice activities with weekly selection tests and reading cards for small group work Leveled Readers KitBuild comprehension and vocabulary skills in small groups and centers Builds fluency with audio CD Challenge HandbooksMeet the needs of high achieving and advanced learners with the instructional strategies and independent activities Theme PaperbacksExtend themes and encourage independence with stories sequenced below, on and above level and labeled with guided reading level lesson plans

104 90 Minute Reading Block Whole Group

105 90 Minute Reading Block Differentiated Instruction

106 Question Can the 90-minute uninterrupted reading block in elementary school be divided between settings (i.e., a general education setting and an ESE resource setting)?

107 Question Can an IEP team make the decision to decrease the 90-minute reading requirement in elementary school for a student with disabilities?

108 Secondary Curriculum

109 Language Arts Core Curriculum Core Textbooks 6-12:  McDougal Littell Literature  Novel Study

110 The District Math Department created a Comprehensive Mathematics Plan to provide leadership to empower teachers to deliver instruction that develops mathematical competence and confidence in students, and provide effective strategies for improving mathematical literacy for all. Comprehensive Mathematics Plan

111 Elementary Core Math Curriculum

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116 Interventions  Interventions are for High Risk, Levels I and II, and/or Tiers 2 and 3 students in addition to the reading block.  Special education classes are not considered an Intervention.

117 Required Reading Interventions  CIRP - Comprehensive Intervention Reading Programs  one or more years below grade level  should accelerate growth in reading with the goal of grade level proficiency  instructional content based on the six essential components of reading instruction (oral language, phonological awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension)  frequent assessments of student progress and more systematic review in order to ensure proper pacing of instruction and mastery of all instructional components.

118 Elementary Reading Interventions Voyager lesson plans can be found at:   Voyager Passport is a comprehensive reading intervention that meets the needs of all struggling readers.  The six essential components of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, oral language, and comprehension) are strategically integrated in systematic minute daily lessons.  An assessment is done after every 10 lessons – “Adventure Checkpoint”.

119 SuccessMaker SuccessMaker develops phonological awareness, phonics, reading fluency, vocabulary and comprehension skills through a lesson-based format that allows students to practice and apply these skills.

120 Elementary Supplemental Reading Interventions  H M Guided Reading  Quick Reads  Early Success  Soar to Success  National Geographic Theme Sets  Words Their Way  RALLY (Essential Skills for Reading Success)  Great Source Lessons in Literacy  Elements of Reading Vocabulary  Earobics  Fast Forward  ELL- Houghton Mifflin Vocabulary and Leveled Readers  ELL- Supplementary Haitian Creole Materials  Abrams Readers Theater  Sing-Spell-Read-Write

121 Additional Elementary Reading Interventions Selected Schools SRA is designed for students in grades 3 through 12 who read so haltingly or inaccurately they can’t understand what they read. for students who do not read at an adequate rate and who confuse words. designed to provide differentiated instruction that is appropriate for each learner through direct instruction Imagine Learning provides a research- based language acquisition curriculum. It is the ideal program for : English language learners Struggling readers Students with disabilities

122 District Approved Interventions for Elementary Reading  Voyager Passport  Successmaker  SRA at selected schools Math  Successmaker  Florida Online Intervention  Florida Destination Math  Florida Soar to Success

123 Middle School Interventions  There are three courses in middle school that reflect the intensity of instruction based on student needs.  All FCAT Level 1 and 2 students, regardless of whether they are fluent, will be placed in the appropriate reading class. ELL students will be scheduled in the Developmental Language Arts Through ESOL course.

124 Middle School Interventions 1.Intensive Reading Plus (IR+): Level 1 and 2 students who are non-fluent and in need of decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension instruction = minimum of 90 minutes daily. 2.Intensive Reading (IR): Level 1 and 2 students who are fluent and in need of vocabulary and comprehension instruction = minimum of 55 minutes daily. 3.Intensive Reading Enrichment (IR-EN): Level 2 students who are fluent and in need of vocabulary and comprehension instruction at a higher level=minimum of 55 minutes daily.

125 CIRP- Required Interventions Grades 6-8  Language!- (Intensive Reading Plus)  Voyager Passport Journeys  (IR - Intensive Reading)  IR-Enrichment)  IR-EN – Selected Grade Level Text, Novels  ELL – Hampton Brown Inside Level A/B for ESOL Level 1  Inside Level C for ESOL 2  Inside Level D for ESOL 3  Inside Level E for ESOL 4

126 Middle School Reading Interventions Intensive Reading PlusIntensive Reading Language! Voyager Passport Journeys

127 Achieve 3000 is a computer based reading program that delivers differentiated assignments at 12 different reading levels, along with formative assessments linked to state and Common Core standards.

128 Secondary (6-8) Reading Interventions  Rewards  Jamestown Timed Readers  Plugged Into Reading  Reading and Writing Sourcebook  SIPPS* (Systematic Instruction in Phonemic Awareness, Phonics and Sight Words)  Quick Reads  ELL- Visions/Thomson Learning  ELL- Focus On Grammar

129 CIRP – Required Interventions Grades 9-12  Hampton Brown Edge (IR+)  Level A – Grade 9  Level B – Grade 10  Jamestown Reading Navigator (IR)  Jamestown Reading Navigator (Trek 4) IR-EN  Selected Grade Level Text, Novels – IR-EN  USA Today (11 th &12 th grade Retaker classes)  ELL-Hampton Brown Edge Fundamentals ESOL Level 1  Edge Level A – ESOL 2  Edge Level B – ESOL 3  Edge Level C – ESOL

130 Secondary Grades 9-12 Supplementary Interventions  SIPPS  Reading Plus  Rewards  Jamestown Timed Readers  USA Today (11 th & 12 th Grade Retakers)  Plugged into Reading  ELL- Focus on Grammar  ELL- Shining Star/Pearson  Academic Support Program  Longman  Reading and Writing Sourcebook  Impact  My Reading Coach  Reader’s Handbook

131 Secondary Grades 9-12 Interventions (Technology)  FCAT Explorer  FCAT Simulation  FCAT Focus  FCAT Express  Reading Plus  Accelerated Reader (AR)  Academy of Reading  READ 180  ELL- COMPASS 4.2  ELL- Teen Biz 3000  ELL – ELLIS Academics

132 District Approved Interventions for Secondary Reading (6-8)  Intensive Reading Plus (Language! Curriculum)  Intensive Reading (Voyager) Reading (9-12)  Intensive Reading Plus (Hampton Brown Edge)  Intensive Reading (Jamestown) Math  Intensive Math

133 Caribbean 0661 SchoolCCRPCIRP/SIR P/ED TECH Reading Minutes per Day Assessments K-2Assessments 3-5 Minutes of Daily Intervention Days per Week of Intervention

134 SchoolCCRP CIRP/SIR P/ ED TECH Reading Minutes Per Day Assessments K-2Assessments 3-5 Minutes of Daily Intervention Days per Week of Interventio n Auburndal e 0121 Auburndal e 0121

135 Resources

136 Resources f-92c4- ffe9756d37d7/1/ccssUpdate.zip/ccss/3-5.htm 464f-92c4- ffe9756d37d7/1/ccssUpdate.zip/ccss/3-5.htm

137 CORRELATING DATA TO GOAL FORMATION (Data Driven IEP) DATA DRIVEN PRESENT LEVELS OF EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE (Quality IEP):

138 What is a Quality IEP? 138  A Quality IEP  Is in compliance with all requirements of federal, state, and district laws and regulations  Reflects decisions based on active and meaningful involvement of members of the IEP team  Provides a clear understanding of Student educational needs and expected outcomes Special education services and supports

139 IDEA Requirements 139  Schools must provide each eligible student with a disability an individualized educational program that:  Is designed to meet the unique educational needs of the student  Addresses academic performance and functional needs  Enables the student to be involved and make progress in the general curriculum

140 MTSS Alignment with IEP Components 140 Step 3. Intervention Planning and Implementation What are we going to do about it? Measurable Annual Goals Special Education Services and Supports Step 4. Response to Instruction/Intervention Is it working? IEP Implementation, Review, and Revision Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance MTSS Multi Tiered System of Supports IEP Individual Education Plan Step 1. Problem Identification What’s the problem? Step 2. Problem Analysis Why is it taking place?

141 Step 1: What's the Problem? 141  Determine the gap between what is expected of a student at a current age or grade level and the current performance of the student.  Review information about student progress to identify general areas of concern and strengths.  Then investigate each area of concern to pinpoint specific needs.

142 Step 2: Why Is It Taking Place? 142  For each area of concern, analyze factors that may be affecting student performance  Curriculum and instruction (standards, instructional methods and materials)  Environment (barriers and supports)  The effect of the student's disability

143 Step 3: Measurable Annual Goals 143  What specific knowledge, skill, or behavior does the student need to learn to be involved and make progress in the general curriculum?  What does the student need to learn to meet other educational needs that result from the disability?  How will student progress be monitored to determine the effectiveness of the intervention and support?

144 Make It Measurable  Specific  The action, behavior, or skill to be measured  Tells what to measure and how to measure it  Objective  Yields same result no matter who measures it  Quantifiable  Numerical or descriptive information that can be compared to baseline to calculate progress  Clear  Understandable by all involved Bateman & Herr, 2003

145 Step 3: Intervention Planning and Implementation 145  What type of intensive, individualized intervention will be provided?  Special education services and related services  What type of support?  Classroom and testing accommodations  Program modifications  Supplementary aids and services  Support for school personnel  When? Where? How often?

146 Step 4: Is it Working? 146  Understanding Responsibilities  Teachers and other service providers must be informed of specific responsibilities related to the student’s IEP.  Each general education teacher, ESE teacher, and other service provider who works with the student must have access to the student’s IEP.

147 Who Will be Responsible for… 147  Planning the intervention for the annual goals?  Implementing the intervention with integrity?  Monitoring student performance and reporting progress to parents?  Interpreting student performance data and making decisions concerning effectiveness of the intervention?

148 Implementation with Fidelity 148  Requires advance planning  Staff may require professional development and coaching How to implement the instructional procedures, accommodations, etc. Assistance with data collection and progress monitoring  Involves collaborative planning

149 Monitoring Student Progress 149 Identify the measurement procedures  Check the annual goals What conditions are required? What specific assessment methods/tools will be used? What are the mastery criteria?  Make a plan When will student be assessed? Who will interpret results?

150 Case Study (Elementary) Case Studies

151 The Comprehensive Evaluation and RtI  Intervention  Intervention Consider ESE Traditional Intervention  Intervention  Intervention Consider ESE If necessary Response to Intervention Regular Education Monitor Progress Monitor Progress

152 Case 1: Grade 3 Student; Reading  Problem ID  Gap Analysis The difference between the student’s current levels of performance and grade level standards  Goal Setting

153 Present Levels of Performance  FCAT 2.0- N/A  FAIR FCAT Success Probability- 15%  FAIR- Reading Comprehension Percentile-18 th  FAIR Maze- 2 nd Percentile  FAIR WA- 2 nd Percentile  Reading Fall Interim Test Level-Insufficient  Reading Fall Interim Percent Correct-25  Current Star Test Level- ?  Oral Reading Fluency-??

154 Graph of Problem ID Reading Comprehension Percentile ( FAIR)

155 Problem Analysis: Why?  Curriculum: 3 rd Grade Reading Standards  Instruction: Reading Focus? Differentiated Instruction?  Environment: Access to Tier 2, What is Tier 3?  Learner: Level of Motivation

156 Reading Development  Phonological Skills  ?  Phonics  WA- 1%ile ?  Reading Fluency  Maze- 4%ile  Comprehension (Oral and Reading)  RC- 4%ile  Listening Comp - ?  Language and Vocabulary-  WIPPSI Verbal 95

157 The Tier 1 and Tier 2 Data Profile  Tool used for 2 Purposes  Determine Need for Tier 3 Problem Solving Uniqueness and significance of a problem Is it a Tier 2 or Tier 3 Problem  Provides Data for Problem Solving ID Needs and Supports Maximizes Tiered Supports

158 Using the Tier 3 PS Worksheet and Intervention Plan to Assist IEP Development  If Done Well, and With Fidelity, Much of the Problem Analysis Has Been Done  Areas for Intervention Have Been Identified  Remedial Goals Have Been Established  Forms of Progress Monitoring Have Been Set

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163 Ticket out the Door-Exit Slips


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