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Introduction to Evidence-Centered Design Modern approach to designing items and tasks.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Evidence-Centered Design Modern approach to designing items and tasks."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to Evidence-Centered Design Modern approach to designing items and tasks

2 Introduction to Evidence-Centered Design Modern Approach to Designing Items and Tasks Traditional Item Development versus Evidence-Centered Design Keys to Evidence- Centered Design Task Models Claims Assessment Targets Evidence

3 Traditional Approach to Item Development 1.2.1Apply reference skills to determine word meanings Apply vocabulary strategies in grade level text Understand and apply new vocabulary Understand and apply content/academic vocabulary Know common sight words appropriate to grade-level Apply fluency to enhance comprehension Apply different reading rates to match text Understand how to use questioning when reading Understand how to create mental imagery Understand and determine important or main ideas and important details in text Apply comprehension monitoring strategies before, during, and after reading: use prior knowledge/schema Apply comprehension monitoring strategies before, during, and after reading: predict and infer Apply comprehension monitoring strategies before, during, and after reading: monitor for meaning, create mental images Apply comprehension monitoring strategies during and after reading: summarize informational/expository text and literary/narrative text.

4 Traditional Approach to Item Development 1.2.1Apply reference skills to determine word meanings Understand and apply new vocabulary Know common sight words appropriate to grade-level Apply fluency to enhance comprehension Apply different reading rates to match text Understand how to use questioning when reading Understand how to create mental imagery Apply comprehension monitoring strategies before, during, and after reading: use prior knowledge/schema Apply comprehension monitoring strategies before, during, and after reading: monitor for meaning, create mental images Apply vocabulary strategies in grade level text Understand and apply content/academic vocabulary Understand and determine important or main ideas and important details in text Apply comprehension monitoring strategies before, during, and after reading: predict and infer Apply comprehension monitoring strategies during and after reading: summarize informational/expository text and literary/narrative text

5 Traditional Approach to Item Development

6 Traditional Approach to Item Development Item: Beth says that = 6. Explain why Beth is correct. Content Standard 2.2.3: Perform addition accurately for single and two digit numbers.

7 Evidence-Centered Design Item/Task Evidence Assessment Target Claim Content Standard

8 Applying Evidence-Centered Design to Item and Task Development Beth says that = 6. Explain why Beth is correct. Content Standard 2.2.3: Perform addition accurately for single and two digit numbers. Weak Evidence

9 Applying Evidence-Centered Design to Item and Task Development = ____ Content Standard 2.2.3: Perform addition accurately for single and two digit numbers. Stronger Evidence

10 Applying Evidence-Centered Design to Item and Task Development Beth says that = 6. Explain why Beth is correct = ____ Content Standard 2.2.4: Perform mathematical operations and justify solutions. Content Standard 2.2.3: Perform addition accurately for single and two digit numbers.

11 6 Key Concepts of Evidence-Centered Design 1. Define the domain 2. Define claims to be made

12 Example of a Claim English Language Arts Literacy Claim #1 Students can read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational texts. English Language Arts Literacy Claim #1 Students can read closely and analytically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational texts.

13 6 Key Concepts of Evidence-Centered Design 1. Define the domain 2. Define claims to be made 3. Define assessment targets

14 Example of an Assessment Target Grade 11 – Assessment Target Analyze the figurative (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox) or connotative meanings of words and phrases used in context and the impact of these word choices on meaning and tone. Grade 11 – Assessment Target Analyze the figurative (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox) or connotative meanings of words and phrases used in context and the impact of these word choices on meaning and tone.

15 6 Key Concepts of Evidence-Centered Design 1. Define the domain 2. Define claims to be made 3. Define assessment targets 4. Define evidence required

16 Example of an Evidence Description Evidence for Assessment Target 1 When reading informational or argumentative texts, students analyze the figurative or implied meanings of words or phrases as they are used in a text and analyze how the choice of these particular words affects meaning and tone. Evidence for Assessment Target 1 When reading informational or argumentative texts, students analyze the figurative or implied meanings of words or phrases as they are used in a text and analyze how the choice of these particular words affects meaning and tone.

17 6 Key Concepts of Evidence-Centered Design 1. Define the domain 2. Define claims to be made 3. Define assessment targets 4. Define evidence required 5. Develop Task Models

18 Example of a Task Model Task Model 1 A constructed response for which the student is prompted to identify an example of figurative language, explain the meaning, and describe how it affects meaning and tone. Stimulus text should be on grade level. Task Model 1 A constructed response for which the student is prompted to identify an example of figurative language, explain the meaning, and describe how it affects meaning and tone. Stimulus text should be on grade level.

19 6 Key Concepts of Evidence-Centered Design 6. Develop Items or Performance Tasks 1. Define the domain 2. Define claims to be made 3. Define assessment targets 4. Define evidence required 5. Develop Task Models

20 Building a Logical Argument Student Response Evidence Assessment Target Claim Common Core State Standards

21 6 Key Components of Evidence-Centered Design 6. Develop Items or Performance Tasks 1. Define the domain 2. Define claims to be made 3. Define assessment targets 4. Define evidence required 5. Develop Task Models

22 Examining an Item Through the Lens of Evidence-Centered Design Use the line buttons to separate the rectangle into 6 equal sections. Then click on the sections to shade the area of the rectangle that represents 2/3 of the area of the whole rectangle. Task Model: Partition tool is used to divide a given quadrilateral into up to 20 equal sections and to highlight fractions of the quadrilateral that represent halves, thirds, quarters, or fifths. Task Model: Partition tool is used to divide a given quadrilateral into up to 20 equal sections and to highlight fractions of the quadrilateral that represent halves, thirds, quarters, or fifths. Evidence: Student can create visual representations of fractions that range from one-half to four-fifths.

23 Using Evidence-Centered Design to Guide Item Design 1.What evidence is required given the assessment target I am measuring? 2.What are the key features that must be included in the item? 3.Will this item allow for the production of the evidence I am seeking? 4.Is there anything about this item that may make it more difficult to collect evidence from some students?

24 Review of Key Concepts Claim Evidence Task Model Item Standard


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