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Students will build sound, logical arguments using evidence found in reading that can be delivered orally and in writing. CHS Common Core Training Phase.

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Presentation on theme: "Students will build sound, logical arguments using evidence found in reading that can be delivered orally and in writing. CHS Common Core Training Phase."— Presentation transcript:

1 Students will build sound, logical arguments using evidence found in reading that can be delivered orally and in writing. CHS Common Core Training Phase II: Argument Literacy

2 Close Reading: a starting point  Hopes for our time together:  Review close reading and good teaching  Intro and/or review text complexity (with an eye toward scaffolding, which is really the key.)  Recognize close reading as prerequisite to argument and rhetoric  See reading as flip side of writing and listening as flip side of speaking  Explore activities for all of above  Leave training with 1 – 2 ideas and a commitment to try them

3 Close Reading: a starting point  Content presented  Reteaching  Opportunity for students to engage with the text with or without help

4 Learning Goals  CCSS (or CCR in AZ) Reading Standard 10 By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (9.RI.10) WATCH TO SEE HOW THIS STANDARD CHANGES AS THE STUDENT MOVES THROUGH HIGH SCHOOL…

5 Learning Goals  CCSS (or CCR in AZ) Reading Standard 10  By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 9– 10 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (10.RI.10.)

6 Learning Goals  CCSS (or CCR in AZ) Reading Standard 10 By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (11.RI.10)

7 Learning Goals  CCSS (or CCR in AZ) Reading Standard 10 By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently. (12.RI.10.)

8 The goal is independence Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility (p. 4). Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

9 “Reading and writing float on a sea of talk” James Britton (1983)

10 Close reading tasks  With each reading, create a question or task that goes a little deeper  What does text say?  How does it say it?  Why does it matter?  Sample ELD close reading Sample ELD close reading

11 Teaching Tips  Cold calling (random math, mental math)  Require annotation! (just a fancy word for note-taking…) Many great apps can be used too  Prepare sentence frames, text dependent questions, and a task for each close reading  Goal to do close reading 2 to 3 times per week  Avoid front-loading vocabulary  It’s important to let students struggle, to reinforce the struggle, and to design activities that show them how they’re learning and growing  TOP – be sure your SWBATS are clear and refer to them often. Students should know what they’re learning; don’t make them guess.

12 See it in action…  Video taken from Fisher and Frey Channel on Youtube of a second grade class discussing a close reading text. Video

13 Text complexity vs. difficulty  Activity: Read “Don’t Blame the Eater.”  Can you see anything that makes this text complex or difficult?  Determine the thesis.  Scrutinize the paragraphs to see what he uses for evidence. Also notice what holds the paragraphs together. How is the essay organized.

14 Text complexity vs. difficulty  That which makes a text complex lives inside the text.  Difficulty depends on our students and how well they can handle the text.  Levels of meaning  Language conventions and clarity  Structure  Knowledge demands

15 How to determine text complexity Text complexity: Raising Rigor in Reading by Douglas Fisher, Nancy Frey, and Diane Lapp. International Reading Association, 2012.

16 Content Specific Concerns:  The reading tasks in many content areas require different skills than literature. Refer to your packets!  Which of the 10 reading standards is most vital to your content?  List texts that show students have met the standard.  What writing tasks would these readings lead into?

17 Argument is powerful “When we get into arguments that focus and fully engage our attention, we become avid seekers of relevant information. Otherwise we take in information passively – if we take it in at all.” Christopher Latsch, p. 27 From They Say/I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, Second Edition, by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein; WW Norton, 2009.

18 Argument is CCR Standard 1  Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

19 Making Thinking Visible  Thesis has to be strong  Evidence has to support it  Warrant  Conclusion  Show them how you think when you read! Show them how you think when you write!

20 Learning happens in an argument  Mastery of vocabulary and content clear  Interactive, authentic situation  Real world verbal interaction  Quality evidence

21 Resources for Argument Explore They Say, I Say blogThey Say, I Say blog

22 Close Reading of a argument  Accommodations/strategies to use with students who struggle  Paraphrasing  Drawing (technical, scientific, foods-visual content)  Simple frame such as This or That

23 Close Reading leads to argument “Don’t Blame the Eater” A. Do we need any clarification? B. Will anyone speak for the thesis? C. Will anyone speak against the thesis?

24 Terminology  Topic Sentence  Commentary  Evidence  Closing Sentence

25 Terminology CLAIM (thesis) (topic sentence) Evidence (CDs)Reasoning (Commentary) Assertion Opinion (statement) Position Point Thesis Hypothesis Proposition Premise Facts Data (concrete) details quotes illustration example figures experimental results research observation anecdote pattern Scientific principle Unit of justification Commentary Explanation elaboration analysis examination exploration interpretation defense validation rationale

26 Templates  Refer to your packets and turn to Templates for Use in a Synthesis Essay —from They Say/I Say by Gerald Graff

27 Possible Activities Fish bowl 4 Corners This or That

28 Conclusion What one or two things are you going to take with you? Share your commitment with a neighbor and agree to check in with each other by the end of the year…


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