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1 English SOL Institute Elementary Nonfiction Reading Strand English SOL Institute Elementary Nonfiction Reading Strand Stephanie Joyner and Carrie Sutton.

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Presentation on theme: "1 English SOL Institute Elementary Nonfiction Reading Strand English SOL Institute Elementary Nonfiction Reading Strand Stephanie Joyner and Carrie Sutton."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 English SOL Institute Elementary Nonfiction Reading Strand English SOL Institute Elementary Nonfiction Reading Strand Stephanie Joyner and Carrie Sutton Hanover County Public Schools

2 2 Elementary Nonfiction Reading Nonfiction comprises at least half of what students read Nonfiction comprises at least half of what students read Content area lessons should reflect integrated English SOL within planning and instruction OR English lessons should integrate other content area information Content area lessons should reflect integrated English SOL within planning and instruction OR English lessons should integrate other content area information Key Points in Reading

3 3 Elementary Nonfiction Reading Key Points in Reading Comprehension skills and strategies are woven throughout Comprehension skills and strategies are woven throughout As students become independent readers, they need to be instructed in reading texts that are considerably longer and more complex in plot, syntax, and structure. As students become independent readers, they need to be instructed in reading texts that are considerably longer and more complex in plot, syntax, and structure.

4 What is nonfiction reading? We generally think of nonfiction reading as: Trade booksTrade books Text booksText books Informational read-aloudsInformational read-alouds However, nonfiction reading is also: FlyersFlyers RecipesRecipes MenusMenus DirectionsDirections We generally think of nonfiction reading as: Trade booksTrade books Text booksText books Informational read-aloudsInformational read-alouds However, nonfiction reading is also: FlyersFlyers RecipesRecipes MenusMenus DirectionsDirections 4 This is called functional text. Magazines Newspapers

5 Trade books and textbooks What are the challenges? 1.Background knowledge 2.Information is everywhere! How do we address these challenges? 1.Background knowledge 2.Information is everywhere! How do we address these challenges? 5

6 Previewing Nonfiction Why do we need to? Nonfiction reading is harderNonfiction reading is harder Our schema is different. We have varying amounts of background knowledge to bring to the table.Our schema is different. We have varying amounts of background knowledge to bring to the table. Why do we need to? Nonfiction reading is harderNonfiction reading is harder Our schema is different. We have varying amounts of background knowledge to bring to the table.Our schema is different. We have varying amounts of background knowledge to bring to the table. 6 How do we do it? Mind mapsMind maps Schema postersSchema posters “I wonder” questions“I wonder” questions How do we do it? Mind mapsMind maps Schema postersSchema posters “I wonder” questions“I wonder” questions

7 Previewing Nonfiction 7 Schema poster Mind map “I wonder” questions

8 Reading Nonfiction Students tend to focus on the main text and view everything else as extra or optional Goal: Get students to realize that everything on the page is equally important in gaining a richer understanding of the topic. Students tend to focus on the main text and view everything else as extra or optional Goal: Get students to realize that everything on the page is equally important in gaining a richer understanding of the topic. 8

9 Reading Nonfiction “A picture is worth a thousand words.” Maps (2)Maps (2) Charts (1)Charts (1) Tables (2)Tables (2) Diagrams (2)Diagrams (2) Captions (1)Captions (1) BulletsBullets Photographs (1)Photographs (1) Glossary (1)Glossary (1) Titles (K)Titles (K) Maps (2)Maps (2) Charts (1)Charts (1) Tables (2)Tables (2) Diagrams (2)Diagrams (2) Captions (1)Captions (1) BulletsBullets Photographs (1)Photographs (1) Glossary (1)Glossary (1) Titles (K)Titles (K) 9 Index (2)Index (2) Fact Boxes / SidebarsFact Boxes / Sidebars Table of Contents (1)Table of Contents (1) Print types (2)Print types (2) Timeline (4)Timeline (4) Graphs (2)Graphs (2) ComparisonsComparisons Headings (K)Headings (K) Illustrations (1)Illustrations (1) Index (2)Index (2) Fact Boxes / SidebarsFact Boxes / Sidebars Table of Contents (1)Table of Contents (1) Print types (2)Print types (2) Timeline (4)Timeline (4) Graphs (2)Graphs (2) ComparisonsComparisons Headings (K)Headings (K) Illustrations (1)Illustrations (1) Nonfiction text features *Features listed in red are specifically mentioned in the Virginia SOL. The number denotes the grade level in which the feature is first mentioned.

10 Reading Nonfiction How do we draw students’ attention to all features of the text? Nonfiction feature booklets Nonfiction feature booklets Scavenger hunts Scavenger hunts Flip the reading Flip the reading How do we draw students’ attention to all features of the text? Nonfiction feature booklets Nonfiction feature booklets Scavenger hunts Scavenger hunts Flip the reading Flip the reading 10

11 Reading Nonfiction How do you flip the reading? Traditionally we read the text first and then look at the other elements. Try thinking outside the box and have students read the extra elements first. Challenge them to get as much information as they can from the extras, not the text. Traditionally we read the text first and then look at the other elements. Try thinking outside the box and have students read the extra elements first. Challenge them to get as much information as they can from the extras, not the text. 11

12 Flip the Reading 12

13 Functional Text What is it? Functional text is real-world text we encounter every day. Why do we draw attention to it? We have to comprehend it in order to function in daily life. Functional text is everywhere! What is it? Functional text is real-world text we encounter every day. Why do we draw attention to it? We have to comprehend it in order to function in daily life. Functional text is everywhere! 13

14 Examples of Functional Text Flyers (3)Flyers (3) MenusMenus Lists (K)Lists (K) Directions (2)Directions (2) Science experiments (2)Science experiments (2) Recipes (1)Recipes (1) Cereal boxesCereal boxes Flyers (3)Flyers (3) MenusMenus Lists (K)Lists (K) Directions (2)Directions (2) Science experiments (2)Science experiments (2) Recipes (1)Recipes (1) Cereal boxesCereal boxes 14 Party InvitationParty Invitation BrochureBrochure Field trip formField trip form Math problems (2)Math problems (2) Sale circularsSale circulars Advertisements (3)Advertisements (3) Coupon booksCoupon books Party InvitationParty Invitation BrochureBrochure Field trip formField trip form Math problems (2)Math problems (2) Sale circularsSale circulars Advertisements (3)Advertisements (3) Coupon booksCoupon books *Examples listed in red are specifically mentioned in the Virginia SOL. The number denotes the grade level in which the text is first mentioned.

15 Reading Functional Text Although we encounter it every day it can be challenging to fully comprehend all the information. Why? Why? 15 It can be busy It can be busy It is not always in a linear format It is not always in a linear format It contains a lot of information. It contains a lot of information.

16 Reading Functional Text Questions to guide discussion: 16 Why would someone read it? Why would someone read it? How would someone read it? How would someone read it? What information could someone get from it? What information could someone get from it? Who would read it? Who would read it?

17 Reading Functional Text Other reading skills to address: Questioning – Students generate questions that could be answeredQuestioning – Students generate questions that could be answered Sequencing – Cut and paste recipes or other directionsSequencing – Cut and paste recipes or other directions Author’s Purpose – Classify examples of functional text by purpose or audienceAuthor’s Purpose – Classify examples of functional text by purpose or audience Other reading skills to address: Questioning – Students generate questions that could be answeredQuestioning – Students generate questions that could be answered Sequencing – Cut and paste recipes or other directionsSequencing – Cut and paste recipes or other directions Author’s Purpose – Classify examples of functional text by purpose or audienceAuthor’s Purpose – Classify examples of functional text by purpose or audience 17

18 Reference Sources Sources listed specifically in the SOLs: Picture dictionary (1)Picture dictionary (1) Dictionary (2)Dictionary (2) Glossary (2)Glossary (2) Index (2)Index (2) Online reference materials (2)Online reference materials (2) Encyclopedia (3)Encyclopedia (3) Atlas (3)Atlas (3) Sources listed specifically in the SOLs: Picture dictionary (1)Picture dictionary (1) Dictionary (2)Dictionary (2) Glossary (2)Glossary (2) Index (2)Index (2) Online reference materials (2)Online reference materials (2) Encyclopedia (3)Encyclopedia (3) Atlas (3)Atlas (3) 18 Due to changing times this tends to be our go to resource for everything, but it is necessary for students to learn print resources as well.

19 Using Reference Sources Times have changed. Most students are no longer familiar with the structure and purpose of print resources. So how do we teach them? We make them real and meaningful. Don’t simply look at the resources. Instead, create them. Times have changed. Most students are no longer familiar with the structure and purpose of print resources. So how do we teach them? We make them real and meaningful. Don’t simply look at the resources. Instead, create them. 19

20 Creating a Dictionary 1. 1.Brainstorm words related to a topic Assign entry words to students or student pairs Students create an entry that includes part of speech, definition, and sentence. (Upper grades can also include pronunciation with syllables, and multiple meanings.) 4. 4.Arrange all entries in alphabetical order Leaving the words in alphabetical order, group entries by the number you want on each page Glue the entries on the pages and use the entries to determine guide words Brainstorm words related to a topic Assign entry words to students or student pairs Students create an entry that includes part of speech, definition, and sentence. (Upper grades can also include pronunciation with syllables, and multiple meanings.) 4. 4.Arrange all entries in alphabetical order Leaving the words in alphabetical order, group entries by the number you want on each page Glue the entries on the pages and use the entries to determine guide words.

21 Creating Other Reference Sources Picture dictionary – replace definitions with pictures Thesaurus – replace definitions with synonyms Encyclopedia – compile student research projects Atlas – compile student drawn maps (bedrooms, settings, etc.) Picture dictionary – replace definitions with pictures Thesaurus – replace definitions with synonyms Encyclopedia – compile student research projects Atlas – compile student drawn maps (bedrooms, settings, etc.)

22 Using Reference Sources Another challenge is learning how to differentiate between each source and its purpose. Activities to address this skill: Which source is best?Which source is best? Reference source scavenger huntReference source scavenger hunt Another challenge is learning how to differentiate between each source and its purpose. Activities to address this skill: Which source is best?Which source is best? Reference source scavenger huntReference source scavenger hunt 22

23 Helpful Information Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions. Print resources we have created will be uploaded to the VDOE website. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions. Print resources we have created will be uploaded to the VDOE website. Other helpful resources: Real-World Reading Comprehension Grades 1-2 (ISBN ) Real-World Reading Comprehension Grades 3-4 (ISBN ) Other helpful resources: Real-World Reading Comprehension Grades 1-2 (ISBN ) Real-World Reading Comprehension Grades 3-4 (ISBN )

24 24 Reference within this presentation to any specific commercial or non-commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer or otherwise does not constitute or imply an endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the Virginia Department of Education. DisclaimerDisclaimer


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