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Lesson Plan Grade 5 Subject: Language Arts Standard 7 Comprehension—Students understand, interpret, and analyze narrative and informational grade level.

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson Plan Grade 5 Subject: Language Arts Standard 7 Comprehension—Students understand, interpret, and analyze narrative and informational grade level."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lesson Plan Grade 5 Subject: Language Arts Standard 7 Comprehension—Students understand, interpret, and analyze narrative and informational grade level text. Objective 2: Apply strategies to comprehend text. b. Generate questions about text (e.g., factual, inferential, evaluative) e. Make inferences and draw conclusions from text Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word: prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Needs work Is it written in a clear and understandable manner? Is it practical (can be carried out in an actual school situation)? Is it geared to the level of the students for which it was prepared? Does it include a clear title for the lesson that accurately reflects the lesson content? Does it include prerequisite skills needed for students to be successful in the lesson? Does it include a complete list of all supplies and materials needed for the lesson? Are the objectives high quality? Does it arouse student interest? Does it activate or build prior knowledge relevant to the content of the lesson? Are the methods, techniques and learning experiences appropriate to the lesson objectives (alignment)? Does it provide students with opportunities to become actively engaged in the learning process? Are a variety of instructional strategies used to meet student needs, interests, and abilities? Is it written in enough detail that someone else could successfully teach the lesson? Does it “wrap up” or extend the lesson in a meaningful way? Does the assessment demonstrate that the student knows or can do the objective? Are there a variety of assessments during the lesson? Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Excellent

2 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word: prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Is it written in a clear and understandable manner? A little choppy, but understandable. Good

3 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word: prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Is it practical (can be carried out in an actual school situation? Problem: Having students create a role play with props and costumes is way too much for one day. Solution: Select a learning activity that can be completed during the lesson. Needs work

4 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Is the lesson geared to the students level? Excellent

5 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Does the lesson include a clear title that accurately reflects the lesson content? Excellent

6 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Does it include prerequisite skills needed for students to be successful in the lesson? A little difficult to determine because of the lack of detail in the lesson. Good

7 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Does it include a complete list of all supplies and materials needed for the lesson? Problem: The only materials listed are the books. Solution: Include the materials the students will need to create props and costumes. Needs work

8 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Are the objectives high quality? Excellent

9 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Does the introduction arouse student interest? Problem: Writing a word and having a student look it up in the dictionary is boring. Solution: Think of something that is interesting and ties in to the lesson objective. Needs work

10 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Does the introduction activate or build prior knowledge relevant to the content of the lesson? Solution: Think of a way to activate the students’ previous experience drawing inferences in daily life.. Problem: Reading the definition of the word does nothing to connect to prior knowledge Needs work

11 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Are the methods, techniques and learning experiences appropriate to the lesson objectives (alignment)?. Problem: Learning to sequence and summarize a story are different comprehension skills than the objective. Solution: Make sure the learning experiences help the students to practice using inferences to understand the meaning of a story. Needs work

12 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Does the lesson provide students with opportunities to become actively engaged in the learning process?. Good

13 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Are a variety of instructional strategies used to meet students needs, interests, and abilities?. Problem: Reading and discussing three books in one lesson could be monotonous. Solution: Think of other instructional strategies to help the students achieve the objective. Focus on meeting a variety of student interests and abilities. Needs work

14 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Is the lesson written in enough detail that someone could successfully teach it? Problem: Not enough detail to know exactly how to teach this lesson. Solution: Write the lesson so a substitute could teach the lesson effectively. Needs work

15 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Does the closure “wrap up” or extend the lesson in a meaningful way?. Problem: Summarizing is not the same as using inferences. No alignment with objective. Solution: Think of a way for the students to review the content or extend their knowledge of the content. Needs work

16 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Does the assessment demonstrate that the student knows or can do the objective?. Problem: The assessment does not align with the objective. Solution: The assessment should show whether the students can use inferences to understand the story. Needs work

17 Lesson Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites: vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants, The Z was Zapped and Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Write “inference” on the board. Have a student look up the definition of the word and read it to the class. Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read The Z was Zapped by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Read Ben’s Dream by Chris Van Allsburg. Discuss the story. Have students work in groups of 4. Have each group read a picture book and then role play the sequence of the story for the rest of the class using props and costumes they have created. Closure: Have four students summarize their story for the class. Are there a variety of assessments during the lesson?. Excellent

18 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Is the lesson written in a clear and understandable manner?

19 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Is the lesson practical?

20 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Is it geared to the students level?

21 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Does the lesson title reflect the lesson content?

22 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Does the lesson include prerequisite skills?

23 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Does the lesson include needed supplies and materials?

24 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Are the objectives high quality?

25 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Does the introduction arouse student interest?

26 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Does the introduction activate prior knowledge?

27 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Are the instructional methods aligned with the lesson objective?

28 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Are the students actively engaged?

29 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Are there a variety of instructional strategies?

30 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Is the lesson written in enough detail?

31 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Does the closure “wrap up” the lesson effectively?

32 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Does the assessment align with the objective?

33 Title: Using inferences to help understand the meaning of a story Prerequisites:vocabulary word : prior knowledge Materials: Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg, several other picture books that require inference to understand the story, post-its, inference worksheet. Lesson Objective: Use inferences and questions to interpret the meaning of a story. Introduction: Start the lesson by acting really mad. Exaggerate your facial and body movements. Ask class: “How do I feel today? What are some clues that let you know? Think of someone you have seen today. How did they feel? What clues did you use that told you how they felt? When you use clues to figure what something means you are using ‘inference’. In books, inference is when the reader uses clues and prior knowledge to figure out what the author means.” Lesson Presentation: Read Two Bad Ants by Chris Van Allsburg. Stop on pages 11,13,17,19,21,13,25,and 29. Each time you stop ask: “What are the specific words and pictures clues that tell you what is really happening to the ants? What prior knowledge did you use to understand what is really happening to the ants?” After finishing reading the book discuss how making inferences was critical to understanding the story. “What if there were no pictures in the book? Would you understand the story? What if there were no words? Would you understand the story?” Discuss how we use both pictures and words to make inferences about the meaning of the story. Show students the worksheet. Have the students help you identify one or two clues from the story and together fill out some of the worksheet. Clue +Prior Knowledge= Inference (Author’s meaning) Have students work in groups of 4. Give each group a short picture book that requires the reader to use inferences to comprehend the story. Provide post-its for each group. Give each group the worksheet. Have the students in each group find at least four places in their story where the author gives a clue to the meaning of the story without actually stating the meaning. Mark the place with a post-it so it is easy to find. Have the students fill out the worksheet for each clue. Closure: Have each group share one clue that they used to make an inference in their book. Pair/share: Why is it important to know how to make inferences? Challenge the students to go home and make an inference while reading or watching something. In class next time, have the students share the inference and the clue they used to make the inference. Are there a variety of assessments?


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