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Carmen S. Concepcion Jennifer Escandell.  Introductions  Great Expectations  Objectives  Explicit Instruction  Think Alouds - Research  Think Alouds.

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Presentation on theme: "Carmen S. Concepcion Jennifer Escandell.  Introductions  Great Expectations  Objectives  Explicit Instruction  Think Alouds - Research  Think Alouds."— Presentation transcript:

1 Carmen S. Concepcion Jennifer Escandell

2  Introductions  Great Expectations  Objectives  Explicit Instruction  Think Alouds - Research  Think Alouds in Action - Demonstrations  Think Alouds in Action - Application  Closing Activity

3  Work with your elbow partners to review the agenda and discuss your expectations for this session.  Share your expectations.

4  Review what we have accomplished throughout the session.  Check-off the topics we have addressed, and note the areas for which more training may be needed.

5 Provide participants with a flexible technique for giving the right kind of help to their students, assistance that will help their students become confident, motivated, and engaged readers.

6 …the most powerful thing we can teach is strategic knowledge, a knowledge of the procedures people use to learn, to think, to read, and to write. Dr. Jeffrey D. Wilhelm, Improving Comprehension with Think-Aloud Strategies, 2001, p. 7

7 Components of Reading Test Performance

8 Components of Reading Test Preparation

9  Zone of Actual Development - Independence This zone is defined by what the child can do on her own without any kind of assistance.  Zone of Proximal Development – Instruction In this zone, students can do with help what they cannot do alone. Dr. Jeffrey D. Wilhelm, Improving Comprehension with Think-Aloud Strategies, 2001, p. 10

10 Teacher Does/Students Watch Step 1: Modeling of Strategy Teacher Does/Student Helps Step 2: Apprenticeship of Use Students Do/Teacher Helps Step 3: Scaffolding Strategy Use Students Do/Teacher Watches Step 4: Independent Use The Steps of Passing Strategic Expertise to Students

11 A think-aloud of reading is creating a record, either through writing or talking aloud, of the Strategic decision-making and interpretive processes of going through a text, reporting everything the reader is aware of noticing, doing, seeing, feeling, asking, and understanding as she reads. A think-aloud involves talking about the reading strategies you are using and the content of the piece you are reading. Dr. Jeffrey D. Wilhelm, Improving Comprehension with Think-Aloud Strategies, 2001, p. 19

12  Make and revise predictions.  Determine the meanings of unknown words.  Use prior knowledge to make sense of the story.  Visualize (e.g., settings, events, characters).  Assume the role of a character.  Reread and use fix-up strategies.  Think, “What is this writer trying to tell me?”  Summarize sections of the text.

13 Teacher models thinking aloud Students thinking aloud with teacher prompting (interactive) Students thinking aloud independently

14  Readers must be selective and have a purpose.  Skim selection first.  Reread each paragraph and underline.  Underline selectively, not entire sentences.  Choose key words and phrases.  Justify with a partner.

15 In your group, match the definitions to the strategies used by proficient readers. Share with the whole group. I Have, You Have

16 Before Reading During Reading After Reading

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19 If we give our developing readers the right kinds of help then they can and will learn to be better readers. Dr. Jeffrey D. Wilhelm, Improving Comprehension with Think-Aloud Strategies, 2001, p. 15

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21 THINKALOUDTHINKALOUD

22 Please note that you leave this session with: › Good notes to use for think-alouds › Think Aloud bookmarks › Other print and online resources in your handouts Thank you for coming! Please fill out the evaluation form.

23 List three big ideas from today’s in-service. List two ways you plan to share this information with your teachers that will impact instruction and student learning. List one question you still have. Reflection: 3-2-1

24 Florida Online Reading Professional Development Beers, K. (2003). When Kids Can’t Read What Teachers Can Do. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemen. Blachowics, C, & Ogle, D. (2001). Reading Comprehension: Strategies for Independent Learners. New York, NY: The Guilford Press. Caroselli, M. (1998). Great Session Openers, Closers & Energizers. New York: MacGraw-Hill. Farstrup, A. E., & Samuels S. J. (2002). What Research Has to Say About Reading Instruction. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Harvey, S. & Goudvis, A. (2007). Strategies that work: Teaching comprehension for understanding and engagement. Portland, ME: Stenhouse. Tierney, R. J., & Readence, J. E. (2000). Reading strategies and practices: A compedium. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. Wilhelm, J. D. (2001). Improving comprehension with think-aloud strategies. New York, NY: Scholastic. Resources

25 Carmen Concepcion Jennifer Escandell Contact Information


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