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1 Air Navigation & Mission Planning CAP SWR-TX-176 Prepared by: Maj Steve Barati Graphics by: Maj Ray Hischke 11/17/09 Click to advance.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Air Navigation & Mission Planning CAP SWR-TX-176 Prepared by: Maj Steve Barati Graphics by: Maj Ray Hischke 11/17/09 Click to advance."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Air Navigation & Mission Planning CAP SWR-TX-176 Prepared by: Maj Steve Barati Graphics by: Maj Ray Hischke 11/17/09 Click to advance

2 2 CAP SM Class Air Navigation and Mission Planning Opening Skit - MP asks MO "are you ready" the reply is a lackadaisical and funny "yes". MP & MO take off, climb out and Pilot asks MO "which way"? Answer - I don't know! A scramble for the map, open fully, in cockpit, blinds Pilot, air nav ensues, both lost due to no prior planning, Pilot lands plane, mission scrubbed. (After Skit) - You can see that without proper mission planning, you could end up with a situation like this and cause a mission failure. So This is why you, the Mission Observer/Scanner, are required to know about air navigation and mission planning. Technically, you are the person responsible for the mission. The Pilot is responsible for the safety of the crew and flying the aircraft. The Mission Observer/ Scanner is responsible for navigation, radios, search, and log keeping. Therefore, it is important that you learn what is represented on a Sectional for navigation and planning purposes and how to plan a grid search so you can adequately assist your Pilot on any given CAP Mission.

3 3 Use legend of sectional to find and define each item. Airport Info Airspace Info Airport Data Comm Info Nav Info Topo Info Obst Info Misc Info

4 4 Houston Sectional Look on the map and find things that can be seen on the ground: Roads - Note not all roads are portrayed - so be careful when navigating by road Power lines - only major lines are on map - be sure it is the right one Towers - note the height of each - some can be higher than you are, i.e., Cleveland, TX area Lakes - small tanks are usually not on the map Rivers - fairly accurate, but they must fit the map to be usable Small towns - used for location only, does not give good definition Small airfields – why? - engine failure RoadPower Line Towers LakeRiverAirfieldTowns

5 5 Things on the map that are not on the ground: Spot elevations - helps identify search altitude Air routes - aircraft follow these air "roads" in the sky - someone could fly right by VOR rose - Good navigation opportunity if used Control zones - remind the Pilot if appropriate Airspace lines - changing altitude of control zone could cause issues Restricted airspace - must stay out unless properly approved for entry MOAs - be aware of use and restrictions, could have a fast mover fly under you Intersections - good nav point, if it applies Radio frequencies - comes in handy for fast reference Military training routes (IR127, VR 142) - military a/c use at low level - Watch out ! Maximum Elevation Figures - easy reference for clearance of obstacles Latitude and Longitude lines - for finding grids and other locations Compass deviation lines - to correct for magnetic headings State and International boundaries - nice to know you are still in the country Contour lines - help navigate the ground

6 6 So why must we, the Observer and Scanner know about these things? To complete mission planning without causing hardship on the Pilot and becoming aware of any hazards that may exist in the Grid. To assist the Pilot in navigation, being aware of airspace requirements, hazards, and direction of flight.

7 7 Section II - Mission Planning Why Mission Planning: You the Observer/Scanner are responsible for conducting the search and must be able to plan the mission. A grid sheet is a useful tool used to conduct an area or point-based search. Remember, the Pilot flies the aircraft. He does not search the ground or navigate the search area. He is responsible for the aircraft, maintaining altitude, airspeed, and safety of flight. Task: Plan a mission to perform a standard grid search of 30/095ACC departing from CXO and returning to CXO using form 104 for information.

8 8 Form 104 Part A

9 9 Form 104 Part B

10 10 Where is the Grid 30/095 ACC? - How do we find it? Use grid finder - place bottom right corner on Lat/Long 30N/95W, look for A - C - C

11 11 Grid Finder Chart

12 12 Houston Sectional with Grid Overlay

13 13 30/095 ACC (HOU 125C) Draw Grid on map under grid finder w/pencil When finished - should look like this:

14 14 Grid Planning: Using a blank grid sheet like this one, we can plan our entire mission and have all the information required.

15 15 Coordinates - Write Lat - Long on grid sheet 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC

16 16 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Terrain Features - draw all avail to assist in navigation Towns

17 17 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Roads

18 18 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Power Lines

19 19 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Railroads

20 20 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Gibbons Creek Lake Rivers & Lakes

21 21 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Gibbons Creek Lake Airways

22 22 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Gibbons Creek Lake Towers

23 23 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Gibbons Creek Lake EW 1 NM 1000’ AGL 465’ MSL 1500’ MSL Search Altitude - expected Altimeter reading 1000 ft AGL plus ground elevation, rounded up

24 24 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Gibbons Creek Lake EW 1 NM 1000’ AGL 465’ MSL 1500’ MSL Course Lines in grid: Determine direction of flight in grid (consider sun, wind, visibility) for N-S or E-W. Insert lines of flight, turning points, and entry & exit points,

25 25 Route to Grid: Why do we want to know the time, distance and direction to Grid? Pilot busy on take off talking with Controllers, etc., and may not think about which direction to fly - You need to know the direction and remind him or point if he is busy on the radio. If you know the distance and approximate time in flight, you know when to expect arrival on site. Determine Heading, Time and Distance to Grid, Direction of return flight, time and distance ID of entry point: How would you determine arrival at destination without GPS? Air navigation (Time, Distance, Heading, Identify items on ground, and electronic navigation (VOR, ADF) Why not GPS? GPS - if working, a great help. But - most of ours are outdated, not calibrated, limited in ability, of many different types, or may be a model you are not familiar with. Further, it may be inoperative or fail in flight - Don't plan you mission based solely on GPS. It is a good back up, but we need to know how to navigate without it.

26 26 Houston Sectional Plot course on chart:

27 27 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Gibbons Creek Lake EW 1 NM 1000’ AGL 465’ MSL 1500’ MSL Log Heading, Time and Distance on grid sheet

28 28 10-A /17/09 HOU 125C30/095 ACC Roans Prairie Shiro Anderson Gibbons Creek Lake EW 1 NM 1000’ AGL 465’ MSL 1500’ MSL 1800 Z 1818 Z 1848 Z 1858 Z 1918 Z Log mission times and radio call times to CAP Mission Base as they occur

29 29 Mission De-brief: Between your grid sheet and the 104, you have all the information needed to complete the paperwork necessary to fulfill CAP requirements Form 104 Part C

30 30 Form 104 Part D

31 31 Air Navigation & Mission Planning FLY SAFE !! CAP SWR-TX-176 Prepared by: Maj Steve Barati Graphics by: Maj Ray Hischke 11/17/09


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