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HEALTH SYSTEMS RESPONSE TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: NATIONAL LANDSCAPE AND BEST PRACTICES Surabhi Kukke, MPH

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Presentation on theme: "HEALTH SYSTEMS RESPONSE TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: NATIONAL LANDSCAPE AND BEST PRACTICES Surabhi Kukke, MPH"— Presentation transcript:

1 HEALTH SYSTEMS RESPONSE TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: NATIONAL LANDSCAPE AND BEST PRACTICES Surabhi Kukke, MPH

2 2 BIG HEALTH SYSTEM CHANGES Unprecedented opportunity to build on these changes and improve the health and safety of women and families

3 3 Why the enhanced health care response? Long term health consequences In addition to injuries, exposure to DV increases risk for:  Chronic health issues  Asthma  Cancer  Hypertension  Depression  Substance abuse  Poor reproductive health outcomes  HIV 3

4 4 What We’ve Learned from Research Studies show:  Women support assessments  No harm in assessing for DV  Interventions improve health and safety of women  Missed opportunities – women fall through the cracks when we don’t ask

5 5 US Preventive Services Task Force  January 2013 recommendations state that there is sufficient evidence to support domestic violence screening and interventions in health settings for women “of childbearing age.” (46 years)  Insufficient evidence for elderly or vulnerable adult Need more research on elder abuse and neglect MUST GALVINIZE the funders of research.

6 6 ACA: Policy Changes Screening and Counseling: As of August 2012: Health plans must cover screening and counseling for lifetime exposure to domestic and interpersonal violence as a core women’s preventive health benefit.

7 7 Affordable Care Act and DV Insurance Discrimination: As of January 2014: Insurance companies are prohibited from denying coverage to victims of domestic violence as a preexisting condition.

8 8 How might this impact DV/SA programs? This recommendation could result in:  Increased referrals (eventually)  Increased training requests  New partnerships  Unintended consequences (reporting/privacy/poorly trained providers)  Reaching more women with prevention and intervention messages  May eventually create new funding streams

9 9 Get Folks Covered!  The ACA makes health insurance coverage available to millions more people, and plans are required to cover a comprehensive set of benefits including medical and behavioral health services!  Open Enrollment is November 15, 2014-February 15, 2015 for coverage in 2015  Starting in just a few weeks is the time to get covered!

10 10 Open Enrollment  Go to healthcare.gov to begin an application  There are limited opportunities to enroll outside of Open Enrollment  Native Americans may enroll at any point during the year - no open enrollment period  Medicaid and CHIP enrollment is year round  Some life changes (e.g., having a baby; moving to a new state) trigger the opportunity to enroll outside of Open Enrollment (Nov 15, Feb 15, 2015)

11 11 Enrollment for Victims of DV  There is a special enrollment rule for victims of DV who are:  Legally married  Live apart from their spouse  Plan to file taxes separately from their spouse  No documentation is needed to prove that you have experienced domestic violence; But victims will have to “attest” to it on their 2014 taxes

12 12 Enrollment for Victims of DV (Con’t)  These people should mark “unmarried” on their Marketplace application—even if married.  Allows an eligibility determination for financial help based on the victim’s income—and not the income of the spouse.  The IRS and HHS both put out this guidance; they say it’s ok to do this on the Marketplace application.

13 13 “Hardship Exemption”  There is a tax penalty for not having health insurance  Women who experience DV who are uninsured are eligible for a waiver (called a “hardship exemption”) from that tax penalty  The hardship exemption application can be found on healthcare.gov  No documentation is needed to prove DV

14 14 Enrollment and Assistance  Help available in the Marketplace and for Medicaid Toll-free Call Center ( ) Healthcare.gov In-person help (e.g., Navigators; Marketplace Guides) Advocates can help connect clients to healthcare  A good place to start: https://localhelp.healthcare.gov https://localhelp.healthcare.gov

15 15 What is the screening benefit?  Plans now cover screening and brief counseling for domestic and interpersonal violence (DV/IPV).  This is not a screening requirement but a coverage requirement; insurance plans must reimburse providers who provide the service.  Coverage may vary by plan but the benefit is available to most people.

16 16 Who can get screening/brief counseling for DV/IPV?  As of January 2014, most people have access to the benefit including: Anyone enrolled in new commercial health insurance plans Anyone enrolled in a plan offered through the new Health Insurance Marketplace Anyone enrolled in the new Medicaid Alternative Benefits Packages

17 17 How often can a woman receive the benefit?  At least once a year  There are no federal restrictions on the number of times a plan will reimburse  Plans will set the limits on what they will cover  It is recommended that all women’s preventive health screenings take place during the “well woman visit” but it is not restricted to once a year

18 18 Who can bill for providing screening/brief counseling?  A wide range of providers will become eligible for reimbursement  Providers will be subject to the scope of state law  Providers will need to have formal relationships with the insurers (private companies or the state Medicaid program) to bill for the services  There are no limits on who the plans and the state can make eligible to bill so there is the opportunity for a wide range of providers to provide screening and brief counseling

19 BEST PRACTICE

20 20 How do we keep a focus on patient centered comprehensive response?  Review limits of confidentiality  Address related health issues  Harm reduction  Supported referral  Trauma informed reporting  Documentation and privacy

21 21 Team-based approach is most effective  Tools are available for initial and booster trainings  Team based approach is effective (physicians, front desk staff)  Additional tools available for community health workers, peer support specialists, outreach workers  Domestic violence advocates are part of that care team No one has to do this alone!

22 22 Not Just Adding a Question on a Form Multiple approaches to screening  Validated assessment tools  Adding questions to intake forms (electronic or written)  Combined with verbal screen: Setting specific Integrated Brochure based

23 23 Visit-Specific Patient Centered Assessment “ I feel safe that the physician takes time into consideration to ask me about my relationship. The questions are very personal and not lots of people in our lives usually ask these questions. The card helps me better understand myself and the wellness of my relationship. Thank you”

24 24 Visit Specific Harm Reduction  Adolescent Health: Anticipatory guidance on healthy relationships  Mental Health: address connection between depression and abuse  Primary Care: discuss healthy coping strategies to respond to lifetime exposure to abuse  Reproductive health: alternate birth control, EC and safer partner notification  Urgent Care: safety planning/lethality assessment

25 25 Adolescent Health  Anticipatory guidance on healthy relationships  Direct assessment  Harm reduction  Warm referral

26 26 California School Based Health Intervention: Results After Training and intervention put into place:  Textual harassment victimization in the past 3 months decreased in both sites: 65% to 22% (school health center) and from 26% to 7% (teen/young adult health center)  In the teen/young adult health center site, past 3 month reproductive coercion decreased from 13% to 2% Clients were overwhelmingly positive about receiving this information from their provider:  84% state they would bring a friend to the health center if they were experiencing an unhealthy relationship

27 27 California School Based Health Intervention: Student Voices “I was in a really bad relationship and talked to them [providers at SBHC], I got out of it. Like, they helped me to realize that I’m way better and I deserve better, and it actually helped. It boosted my confidence in myself and I became a more independent young woman, I think.”

28 28 Reproductive Health Universal Education about abuse and coercion and impact on reproductive health Direct Assessment Harm Reduction (birth control that can’t be interfered with) Warm Referral

29 29 Of 1278 women sampled in 5 Family Planning clinics  53% experienced DV/SA  Similar rates in other clinic settings Health interventions with women who experienced recent partner violence:  71% reduction  71% reduction in odds for pregnancy coercion compared to control 60% more likely  Women receiving the intervention were 60% more likely to end a relationship because it felt unhealthy or unsafe Miller, et al 2010 Setting specific examples

30 30 What we know from practice: Partnerships make a difference Partnerships between advocates and health professionals are not new. They inform our understanding of how best to support patients impacted by IPV.  Hospital based programs  10 state program  National Standards Campaign  Project Connect  Delta Project  NNEDV’s HIV Project  Much more

31 31 “ Warm” referral to community agencies If there are no onsite services: “If you are comfortable with this idea I would like to call my colleague at the local program (fill in person's name) Jessica, she is really an expert in what to do next and she can talk with you about supports for you and your children from her program…” “There are national confidential hotline numbers and the people who work there really care and have helped thousands of women. They are there 24/7 and can help you find local referrals too and connect you by phone…”

32 32 Online Resource on Health and IPV Offers policy memos, patient and provider educational tools and resources. See also:

33 33 National Health Resource Center on DV Free patient and provider materials Technical assistance In person and web based training Model programs Systems reform and policy change

34 34 Thank you!

35 HEALTH SYSTEM RESPONSE TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: STATE LANDSCAPE Krista Del Gallo Policy Manager

36 MISSION: TCFV PROMOTES SAFE AND HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS BY SUPPORTING SERVICE PROVIDERS, FACILITATING STRATEGIC PREVENTION EFFORTS, AND CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR FREEDOM FROM DOMESTIC VIOLENCE.

37 Texas Prevalence Study Of women reporting intimate partner violence in their lifetime: over 22% became pregnant, and 25% contracted an STD as a result of the abuse.

38 Domestic violence negatively impacts survivor patient outcomes including: Maternal health Pregnancy outcomes Children’s cognitive and emotional development and physical health Parenting skills Family safety Social support

39 Providers Make a Difference Women who talked to their health care provider about the abuse were: 4 times more likely to use an intervention 2.6 times more likely to exit the abusive relationship

40 TEXFAM Existing law in Texas limited to a provision in the Family Code INFORMATION PROVIDED BY MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS Requires referral to family violence shelter center, documentation in medical file, and providing “NOTICE TO ADULT VICTIMS OF FAMILY VIOLENCE” in writing

41

42 HB 2620 Creating a Health Systems Response to Domestic Violence among Pregnant and Post-partum Women Author, Nicole Collier (D-Fort Worth) Sponsor, Senator Bob Deuell (R-Greenville)

43 HB 2620 Caption: relating to the creation of a task force on domestic violence. Creates Health and Safety Code Sections to Effective June 16, 2013

44 HB 2620 Report due to the Legislature by September 1, 2015 to include:  The findings and legislative, policy, and research recommendations of the task force; and  A description of the activities of the task force. Task force expires on January 1, 2016.

45 HB 2620 Three public meetings held thus far in November, May, and October. Formation of Committees  Research  Education and Protocols  Services  Policy and Public Awareness Committee membership extends beyond formal task force membership.

46 Potential Policy Considerations Consolidation of state women’s health services pursuant to Sunset Recommendations Medicaid  Pregnancy Medicaid terminates at 60 days post partum  Coverage gap More emphasis on “toxic stress” during pregnancy and post partum depression

47 Current Groups and Stakeholders Texas Collaborative for Health Mothers and Babies  Expansion of Healthy Texas Babies under DSHS  Someday Starts Now campaign  Text4baby Texas Women’s Healthcare Coalition  Maintenance / increase of women’s health services $$ Children’s Advocacy Groups Professional Associations

48 KRISTA DEL GALLO POLICY MANAGER


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