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Renée Wilson-Simmons, DrPH Director National Center for Children in Poverty Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health July 10-11, 2013  Baltimore,

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Presentation on theme: "Renée Wilson-Simmons, DrPH Director National Center for Children in Poverty Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health July 10-11, 2013  Baltimore,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Renée Wilson-Simmons, DrPH Director National Center for Children in Poverty Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health July 10-11, 2013  Baltimore, Maryland

2 A non-partisan, public policy research center dedicated to promoting the economic security, health, and well-being of America’s low-income children and families National Center for Children in Poverty

3 We Know Children do better when their families do better. Our Vision An America where all families are economically secure, strong, and nurturing, and all children are supported so they thrive and grow into healthy adults

4 What We Do NCCP:  Helps policymakers understand and adopt the most effective programs and policies that can reduce family economic hardship and the negative effects of poverty on children  Assists service providers in their efforts to turn research into practice and identify and implement research‐based programs  Supports advocates as they develop and implement plans to influence public policy and resource allocation decisions  Encourages and aids the media in telling the story of poor children and families in America

5 Children Living in Poor and Near-Poor Families

6 Percentage of Low-Income and Poor Families by Race/Ethnicity, 2011

7 Parent’s Education by Family Income, 2011

8 A Major Area of Focus: The Link between Poverty and Child Health and Development Low family income can:  Impede children’s cognitive development and their ability to learn  Contribute to behavioral, social, and emotional problems  Cause and exacerbate poor child health Children at greatest risk are those who experience economic hardship when they are young, and children who experience severe and chronic hardship. Source: NCCP. Ten Important Questions About Child Poverty and Family Economic Hardship, 2009

9 Poor Outcomes for Many Poor Children  Many infants born into poverty have a higher likelihood of prematurity and morbidity than those in higher- income families.  They experience subsequent developmental delays that leave many inadequately prepared to succeed in school and interact well with others

10 Environmental Risks Exposure to lead-based paint: A neurotoxin that accumulates in the body and puts some poor children in lower-income neighborhoods at risk for irreversible neurologic damage Inadequate nutrition: Associated with childhood obesity, a strong predictor of adult obesity and risks of morbidity and premature mortality. Iron-deficiency anemia: Afflicts about I/4 of low-income children in the U.S., and can impair brain development when severe

11 Mental Health Mental health problems identified in early childhood:  Tend to persist in the absence of interventions  Have negative effects on children’s learning and school success  Have been associated with child maltreatment

12 Single-Mother Families  Are 5 times more likely to be poor than married-couple families with children  Nearly three out of four single parents with long-term unemployment were poor in 2011

13 Depression among Poor Mothers  11 percent of infants living in poverty have a mother suffering from severe depression.  Compared with their peers with non-depressed mothers, infants living in poverty with severely depressed mothers are more likely to have mothers who also struggle with domestic violence and substance abuse.  Many depressed mothers living in poverty are already connected to services, such as WIC, health care, and SNAP Source: Vericker T., Macomber J., Golden, O. (2010). Infants of Depressed Mothers Living in Poverty: Opportunities to Identify and Serve. Washington DC: Urban Institute.

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15 Our Integrated Policy Approach: A Three-Legged Stool Good health and mental health High-quality early care and education Economically secure and nurturing families

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17 Early Childhood State Policy Profiles Present each state’s policy choices in:  Health and Nutrition  Early Care and Education  Parenting and Family Economic Supports

18 Young Child Risk Calculator How many young children in a state are experiencing individual or multiple risks that affect their development and school readiness? Choose: Age Range: Age Range: Under 3 / 3 -5 / Under 6 Income Level: Income Level: Low Income / Poverty / Extreme Poverty Risk Factors: Risk Factors: Households without English speakers Large family Low parental education Residential mobility Single parent Teen mother Non-employed parent(s)

19 Fact Sheets, Briefs, and Reports Young Children at Risk: National and State Prevalence Factors, 2012 Practices for Promoting Young Children’s Learning in Quality Rating Improvement Systems (QRIS) Standards, 2012 What Can CCDF Learn from the Research on Children’s Health and Safety in Child Care, 2012 Coaching and Quality Assistance in Quality Rating Improvement Systems, 2012 Linking Home-Based Child Care and State-Funded Preschool : The Community Connections Preschool Program (Illinois Action for Children), 2011

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21 Renée Wilson-Simmons, DrPH Director National Center for Children in Poverty Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Health Policy & Management 215 West 125th Street, 3rd floor New York, NY TEL FAX


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