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“Changing Policy Environment and International Business” Prepared by Vassily K. Dermanov Some theory of international trade.

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Presentation on theme: "“Changing Policy Environment and International Business” Prepared by Vassily K. Dermanov Some theory of international trade."— Presentation transcript:

1 “Changing Policy Environment and International Business” Prepared by Vassily K. Dermanov Some theory of international trade

2 2 International Trade Buying and selling goods and services from other countries The purchase of goods and services from abroad that leads to an outflow of currency from the UK – Imports (M) The sale of goods and services to buyers from other countries leading to an inflow of currency to the UK – Exports (X)

3 3 Labour productivity and comparative advantage: the Ricardian model

4 4 Why countries are engaged in international trade?  First, countries trade because they are different from each other.  Second, countries trade to achieve economies of scale in production.

5 5 The concept of comparative advantage

6 6  Is it possible to grow roses in Saint Petersburg?  It is a lot easier to grow roses in the South America.  A given amount of resources used in generator production yields fewer generators in South America than in Russia.

7 7 Opportunity cost and trade-off: the opportunity cost of roses in terms of electric generators is the number of generators that could have been produced with the resources used to produce a given number of roses. The trade-off in South America might be something like 10 million roses for 100 generators, and 10 million roses for 500 generators in Russia.

8 8 Roses, millions Electric Generators, units Russia10- South America10- Maximum20- National Production

9 9 Roses, millions Electric Generators, units Russia-500 South America-100 Maximum-600 National Production

10 10 Roses, millions Electric Generators, units Russia (50:50)5250 South America (50:50) 550 Total (50:50)10300 National Production

11 11 Let Russia stop growing roses and devote the resources to produce generators. Let South America grow those roses instead. Look what has happened: Russia concentrating on generators and South America concentrating on roses, increases the size of the world's economic pie.

12 12 Roses, millions Electric Generators, units Russia South America 10 - World total Hypothetical Changes in Production

13 13 International trade increases world output because it allows each country to specialise in producing the good in which it has a comparative advantage. A country has a comparative advantage in producing a good if the opportunity cost of producing that good in terms of other goods is lower in that country than it is in other countries.

14 14 Specialisation and Trade Different factor endowments mean some countries can produce goods and services more efficiently than others – specialisation is therefore possible: Absolute Advantage: –Where one country can produce goods with fewer resources than another Comparative Advantage: –Where one country can produce goods at a lower opportunity cost – it sacrifices less resources in production

15 15 South America has a comparative advantage in roses and Russia has a comparative advantage in generators. The standard of living can be increased in both places if South America produces roses for Russia, while the Russia produces generators for the South America. So, trade between two countries can benefit both countries if each country exports the goods in which it has a comparative advantage.

16 16 The Terms of Trade The Terms of Trade looks at the relationship between the price received for exports and the amount of imports we are able to buy with that money. Average Price of Exports Terms of Trade = Average Price of Imports

17 17 This approach, in which international trade is solely based on international differences in the productivity of labour, is known as the Ricardian model.

18 18 A One-Factor Economy

19 19 A One-Factor Economy  An economy (Home) has only one factor of production - labour.  Only two goods - wine and cheese - are produced.  The technology of Home's economy can be summarised by labour productivity in each industry, expressed in terms of the unit labour requirement.

20 20 A One-Factor Economy  It might require: - 1 hour of labour to produce a kg of cheese, - 2 hours to produce a litre of wine.  For future reference, we define:  a lw as the unit labour requirements in wine production,  a lc as the unit labour requirements in cheese production, respectively.  The economy's total resources are defined as L, the total labour supply.

21 21 Home wine production, Q w, in litres Home cheese production, Qw, in kg PPFPPF L/a lw L/a lc Absolute value of slope equals opportunity cost of cheese in terms of wine

22 22 L * /a * lw L * /a * lc Because Foreign's relative unit labour requirement in cheese is higher than Home's (it needs to give up many more units of wine to produce one more unit of cheese), its production possibility frontier is steeper. Foreign wine production, Q w, in litres Foreign cheese production, Qw, in kg PPFPPF

23 23 RELATIVE PRICES AND SUPPLY

24 24 RELATIVE PRICES AND SUPPLY  Let P С and P W be the prices of cheese and wine, respectively. Costs:  It takes a LC person-hours to produce a kg of cheese.  It takes a LW person-hours to produce a litre of wine.

25 25  The economy will specialise in the cheese production if P C /P W > a LC / a LW ;  it will specialise in the production of wine if P C /P W < a LC / a LW.  Only when P C /P W is equal a LC / a LW, will both goods be produced. RELATIVE PRICES AND SUPPLY

26 26 §The economy will specialise in the production of cheese if the relative price of cheese exceeds its opportunity cost. §It will specialise in the production of wine if the relative price of cheese is less than its opportunity cost.

27 27 In the absence of international trade, Home would have to produce both goods for itself. But it will produce both goods only if the relative price of cheese is just equal to its opportunity cost. In the absence of international trade, the relative prices of goods are equal to their relative unit labor requirements.

28 28 Trade in a One-Factor World

29 29  Suppose that there are two countries: Home and Foreign.  We denote Home's labor force by L and Home's unit labor requirements in wine and cheese production by a LW and a LC, respectively.  We denote Foreign's labor force L*; Foreign's unit labor requirements in wine and cheese will be denoted by a* LW and a* LC, respectively. Let as assume that: a LC /a LW < a* LC / a* LW or, equivalently, that a LC / a* LC < a LW / a* LW.

30 30 Wine production, Q w, in litres Cheese production, Qc, in kg L/alw PF L/alc Home Wine production, Q W *, in litres Cheese production, Qc, in kg PF* L*/a*lc L*/a*lw Foreign

31 31 Home's relative productivity in cheese is higher than it is in wine.  Home has a comparative advantage in cheese. Foreign's relative productivity in wine is higher than it is in cheese. Foreign has a comparative advantage in wine.

32 32  When one country can produce a unit of a good with less labor than another country, we say that the first country has an absolute advantage.  One of the most important sources of error in discussing international trade is to confuse comparative advantage with absolute advantage.

33 33  In the absence of foreign trade the relative prices in each country would be determined by the relative unit labor requirements.  In case of international trade prices will no longer be determined purely by domestic considerations.

34 34 The World Relative Supply and Demand

35 35 World Relative Supply and Demand Pc/Рw a LC / a LW a* LC / a* LW RS RD L / а LC L* / а* LW Relative quantity of cheese Qc + Qc* Qw + Qw* Relative prices of cheese

36 36 World Relative Supply and Demand Pc/Рw a LC / a LW a* LC / a* LW RS RD L / а LC L* / а* LW Relative quantity of cheese Qc + Qc* Qw + Qw* Relative prices of cheese There will be no world cheese production and no world supply of cheese if the world price drops below аLC /аLW. Home and Foreign will produce wine only whenever Pc/Pw < аLC /аLW.

37 37 World Relative Supply and Demand Pc/Рw a LC / a LW a* LC / a* LW RS RD L / а LC L* / а* LW Relative quantity of cheese Qc + Qc* Qw + Qw* Relative prices of cheese When the relative price of cheese, Pc/Pw, is exactly аLC /аLW, workers in Home can earn exactly the same amount making either cheese or wine. So Home will be willing to supply any relative amount of the two goods, producing a flat section to the supply curve. Foreign will produce wine whenever Pc/Pw < а*LC /а*LW.

38 38 World Relative Supply and Demand Pc/Рw a LC / a LW a* LC / a* LW RS RD L / а LC L* / а* LW Relative quantity of cheese Qc + Qc* Qw + Qw* Relative prices of cheese If Pc/Pw is above аLC /аLW Home will specialize in the production of cheese. As long as Pc/Pw < а*LC /а*LW, however. Foreign will continue to specialize in producing wine.

39 39 World Relative Supply and Demand Pc/Рw a LC / a LW a* LC / a* LW RS RD L / а LC L* / а* LW Relative quantity of cheese Qc + Qc* Qw + Qw* Relative prices of cheese At Pc Pw = а*LC /а*LW, Foreign workers are indifferent between producing cheese and wine. Thus here we again have a flat section of the supply curve.

40 40 World Relative Supply and Demand Pc/Рw a LC / a LW a* LC / a* LW RS RD L / а LC L* / а* LW Relative quantity of cheese Qc + Qc* Qw + Qw* Relative prices of cheese Finally, for Pc/Pw > а*LC /а*LW, both Home and Foreign will specialize in cheese production. There will be no wine production, so that the relative supply of cheese will become infinite.

41 41 Russia and Germany: mutual trade Oil Oil from Russia Cars from Germany Map courtesy of case

42 42 Russia and Germany: Relative Supply and Demand in oil and cars Pc/Рoil a ru LC / a ru Loil a ger LC / a ger Loil RS RD L ru / а ru LC L ger / а ger Loil Relative quantity of cars Q ru c + Qc ger Q ru oil + Qoil ger Relative prices of cars

43 43 The Gains From Trade

44 44 THE GAINS FROM TRADE Trade as an indirect method of production produce by producing cheese  Home could produce wine directly, but trade with Foreign allows it to " produce " wine by producing cheese and then trading the cheese for wine.  This indirect method of "producing" wine is a more efficient method than direct production.

45 45 Trade affects each country's possibilities for consumption.  In the absence of trade, consumption possibilities are the same as production possibilities.  Once trade is allowed, however, each economy can consume a different mix of cheese and wine from the mix it produces.  Trade makes residents of each country better off.

46 Resources and Trade: The Heckscher-Ohlin Model

47 47 Introduction Comparative advantage could arise because of international: –differences in labor productivity; –differences in countries' resources. Canada exports forest products to the United States because Canada has more forested land per capita than the United States.

48 48 Labor is important, but what about of other factors of production (such as land, capital, and mineral resources) ? We will examine a model in which resource differences are the only source of trade. This model shows that comparative advantage is influenced by the interaction between nations' resources and the technology of production. What does it mean efficiency?

49 49 Developed by two Swedish economists, Eli Heckscher and Bertil Ohlin (Nobel Prize in economics in 1977), the theory is often referred to as the Heckscher-Ohlin theory (H-O theory). H-O theory emphasises the interplay between the proportions in which different factors of production are available in different countries and the proportions in which they are used in producing different goods. Due to it is also referred to as the factor-proportions theory.

50 50 A Model of a Two-factor Economy The model is in many ways very similar to the specific factors model. It is assumed that each economy is able to produce two goods and that production of each good requires the use of two factors of production. The same two factors are used in both sectors. ( It is a more difficult model, but with some new insights.

51 51 Assumptions of the Model The economy we are analyzing can produce two goods: cloth and food. Production of these goods requires two inputs that are in limited supply: labor and land. Let us define the following expressions: a TC = acres of land used to produce one m 2 of cloth a LC = hours of labor used to produce one m 2 of cloth a TF = acres of land used to produce one calorie of food a LF = hours of labor used to produce one calorie of food L = economy's supply of labor Т = economy's supply of land

52 52 Notice that we speak in these definitions of the quantity of land or labor used to produce a given amount of food or cloth, rather than the amount required to produce that amount. The reason is that in a two-factor economy there may be some room for choice in the use of inputs.

53 53 Input Possibilities in Food Production Unit land input a TF, in acres per calorie Unit labor input, a LF, in hours per calorie Input combinations that produce one calorie of food I II I

54 54 What input choice will producers actually make? It depends on the relative cost of land and labor. If land rents are high and wages low, farmers will choose to produce using relatively little land and a lot of labor. If rents are low and wages high, they will save on labor and use a lot of land.

55 55 Factor Prices and Input Choice Wage-rental ratio, w/r Land-labor ratio, T/L FF In each sector, the ratio of land to labor used in production depends on the cost of labor relative to the cost of land, w/r. The curve FF shows the land- labor ratio choices in food production, the curve CC the corresponding choices in cloth production. At any given wage-rental ratio, food production uses a higher land-labor ratio; so, food production is land- intensive and that cloth production is labor-intensive. w/r СС w - is the wage rate per hour of labor; r - the cost of one acre of land,

56 56 Factor Prices and Goods Prices Suppose that the economy produces both cloth and food. Then competition among producers in each sector will ensure that the price of each good equals its cost of production. The cost of producing a good depends on factor prices: If the rental rate on land is higher, then other things equal the price of any good whose production involves land input will also have to be higher.

57 57 Factor Prices and Goods Prices Relative price of cloth, P C /P F Wage-rental ratio, w/r SS Because cloth production is labor-intensive there is a one-to-one relationship between the factor price ratio w/r and the relative price of cloth P C /P F. The higher the relative cost of labor, the higher must be the relative price of the labor-intensive good.

58 58 Let us put previous figures together. In combined figure the SS curve will be turned on its side, while the right panel reproduces figure with “Factor prices and Input Choice”. Relative price of cloth, P C /P F Wage-rental ratio, w/r SS Wage-rental ratio, w/r Land-labor ratio, T/L FF w/r СС

59 59 From Goods Prices to Input Choices Relative price of cloth, P C /P F Land-labor ratio, T/L FF СС w/r 1 w/r 2 SS P C /P 2 F P C /P 1 F T C /L 1 C T C /L 2 C T F /L 1 F T F /L 2 F Increasing By putting these diagrams together, we see a surprising linkage of the prices of goods to the ratio of land to labor used in the production of each good. Wage-rental ratio, w/r

60 60 From Goods Prices to Input Choices Relative price of cloth, P C /P F Wage-rental ratio, w/r Land-labor ratio, T/L FF СС w/r 1 w/r 2 SS P C /P 2 F P C /P 1 F T C /L 1 C T C /L 2 C T F /L 1 F T F /L 2 F Increasing

61 61 Resources and Output Let us describe the relationship between goods prices, factor supplies, and output. Suppose that we take the relative price of cloth as given. Relative price of cloth determines the wage-rental ratio w/r, and thus the ratio of land to labor used in the production of both cloth and food.

62 62 The Allocation of Resources Increasing Land used in food production Labor used in cloth production Labor used in food production Land used in cloth production Increasing

63 63 The Allocation of Resources Increasing Land used in food production Labor used in cloth production Labor used in food production Land used in cloth production Increasing The height of the box represent s total supply of land.

64 64 The Allocation of Resources Increasing Land used in food production Labor used in cloth production Labor used in food production Land used in cloth production Increasing The width of the box represents the economy's total supply of labor.

65 65 The Allocation of Resources Increasing Land used in food production Labor used in cloth production Labor used in food production Land used in cloth production Increasing OFOF LFLF LCLC TFTF TCTC OCOC C F 1

66 66 The Allocation of Resources Increasing Land used in food production Labor used in cloth production Labor used in food production Land used in cloth production Increasing OFOF LFLF LCLC TFTF TCTC OCOC C F 1 Thus at point 1 O C L C is the labor used in cloth production and O C T C is the land used in cloth production. We measure the use of labor and land in the cloth sector as the horizontal and vertical distances of such a point from O C. Thus at point 1 O C L C is the labor used in cloth production and O C T C is the land used in cloth production.

67 67 The Allocation of Resources Increasing Land used in food production Labor used in cloth production Labor used in food production Land used in cloth production Increasing OFOF LFLF LCLC TFTF TCTC OCOC C F 1 We measure inputs into the food sector starting from the opposite comer: O F L F is the labor, O F T F the land used in food production. OFOF

68 68 The question is what happens when the economy's supply of land is increased, holding both goods prices and the labor supply fixed.

69 69 Increasing Land used in food production Labor used in cloth production Labor used in food production Land used in cloth production Increasing O1FO1F L1CL1C T1CT1C OCOC C F1F1 1 An Increase in the Supply of Land O2FO2F F2F2 2T2CT2C L2CL2C

70 70 Increasing Land used in food production Labor used in cloth production Labor used in food production Land used in cloth production Increasing O1FO1F L1CL1C T1CT1C OCOC C F1F1 1 An Increase in the Supply of Land O2FO2F F2F2 2T2CT2C L2CL2C Thus an increase in the economy's supply of land will, holding prices constant, lead to a fall in the output of the labor-intensive good.

71 71 Output of food, Q F Output of cloth, Q C Q2FQ2F Q2CQ2C 2 TT 1 Q1FQ1F 1 Q1CQ1C An increase in the supply of land shifts the economy's production possibility frontier outward from TT 1 to TT 2, but does so disproportionately in the direction of food production. The result is that at an unchanged relative price of cloth (indicated by the slope -P С /P F ), cloth production actually declines from Q 1 C to Q 2 C. Resources and Production Possibilities TT 2 Slope = - P M / P F Slope = - P C / P F

72 72 Output of energy, Q E Output of machinery, Q M Q2EQ2E Q2MQ2M 2 TT 1 Q1EQ1E 1 Q1MQ1M at an unchanged relative price of machinery An increase in the supply of energy shifts the economy's production possibility frontier outward from TT 1 to TT 2. The result is that at an unchanged relative price of machinery (indicated by the slope -P M /P E ), machinery production actually declines from Q 1 M to Q 2 M. Russia: resources and Production Possibilities TT 2 Slope = - P M / P E case

73 73 The biased effect of increases in resources on production possibilities is the key to understanding how differences in resources give rise to international trade. An increase in the supply of land expands production possibilities disproportionately in the direction of food production, while an increase in the supply of labor expands them disproportionately in the direction of cloth production.

74 74 Abundance and Intensity The resource of which a country has a relatively large supply is the abundant factor in that country, and the resource of which it has a relatively small supply (land in Home, labor in Foreign) is the scarce factor.

75 75 Abundance and Intensity Example: If America has 80 million workers and 200 million acres (a labor-to-land ratio of 1: 2.5), while Britain has 20 million workers and 20 million acres (a labor-to-land ratio of 1:1) we consider Britain to be labor-abundant even though it has less total labor than America. Since Home has a higher ratio of labor to land than Foreign, Home is labor- abundant and Foreign is land-abundant.

76 76 Abundance and Intensity So, "abundance" is always defined in relative terms, by comparing the ratio of labor to land in the two countries. Thus, no country is abundant in everything. Since cloth is the labor-intensive good, Home's production possibility frontier relative to Foreign's is shifted out more in the direction of cloth than in the direction of food.

77 77 Thus an economy with a high ratio of land to labor will be relatively better at producing food than an economy with a low ratio of land to labor. Generally, an economy will tend to be relatively effective at producing goods that are intensive in the factors with which the country is relatively well- endowed.

78 78 Effects Of International Trade Between Two-Factor Economies What happens when two such economies, Home and Foreign, trade. Home and Foreign are similar along many dimensions: – the same tastes, – identical relative demands for food and cloth, – the same technology: a given amount of land and labor yields the same output of either cloth or food in the two countries.

79 79 Effects Of International Trade Between Two-Factor Economies The only difference between the countries is in their resources: Home has a higher ratio of labor to land than Foreign does.

80 80 That means that Home will have a larger relative supply of cloth. Home's relative supply curve, then, lies to the right of Foreign's. The relative supply schedules of Home (RS) and Foreign (RS*) are illustrated in the next figure.

81 81 RS RS * RS WORLD RD WORLD (P C /P F ) * (P C /P F ) (P C /P F ) W Relative quantity of cloth, Relative price of cloth, P C /P F Trade Leads to a Convergence of Relative Prices Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F * In the absence of trade, Home's equilibrium would be at point 1, where domestic relative supply RS intersects the relative demand curve RD. In the absence of trade, Foreign's equilibrium would be at point 3., where Foreign relative supply RS* intersects the relative demand curve RD. Trade leads to a world relative price that lies between the pretrade prices, e.g., at point 2.

82 The standard trade model

83 83 In spite of the differences in their details, our models share a number of features. 1. The productive capacity of an economy can be summarized by its production possibility frontier. 2. Production possibilities determine a country's relative supply schedule. 3. World equilibrium is determined by world relative demand and a world relative supply.

84 84 The models may be viewed as special cases of a more general model of a trading world economy. So, let’s develop a standard model of a trading world economy to understand how a variety of changes in basic parameters affect the world economy.

85 85 A STANDARD MODEL OF A TRADING ECONOMY The standard trade model is built on four key relationships: the relationship between the production possibility frontier and the relative supply curve; the relationship between relative prices and relative demand; the determination of world equilibrium by world relative supply and world relative demand, and the effect of the terms of trade on a nation's welfare.

86 86 PRODUCTION POSSIBILITIES AND RELATIVE SUPPLY Let’s assume that each country produces – two goods, food (F) and cloth (C), – country's production possibility frontier is a smooth curve.

87 87 Relative Prices Determine the Economy's Output Food production, Q F Cloth production, QС The point on PPF at which an economy actually produces depends on the price of cloth relative to food, P C /P F.

88 88 Relative Prices Determine the Economy's Output Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С It is a basic proposition of microeconomics that a market economy maximizes the value of output at given market prices, P C Q C + P F Q F.

89 89 We can indicate the market value of output by drawing a number of isovalue lines — that is, lines along which the value of output is constant.

90 90 Relative Prices Determine the Economy's Output Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С Q Isovalue lines TT An economy whose production possibility frontier is TT will produce at Q, which is on the highest possible isovalue line.

91 91 Relative Prices Determine the Economy's Output Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С Q Isovalue lines TT Each of these lines is defined by an equation of the form P C Q C + P F Q F = V.

92 92 Relative Prices Determine the Economy's Output Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С Q Isovalue lines TT The higher V is, the farther out an isovalue line lies; thus isovalue lines farther from the origin correspond to higher values of output.

93 93 Relative Prices Determine the Economy's Output Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С Q Isovalue lines TT The economy will produce the highest value of output it can, which can be achieved by producing at point Q.

94 94 How an Increase in the Relative Price of Cloth Affects Relative Supply Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С TT Q1Q1 Q2Q2 V V 1 ( P C /P F ) 1 V V 2 ( P C /P F ) 2 The isovalue lines become steeper when the relative price of cloth rises from (P C /P F ) 1 to (P C /P F ) 2 (shown by the rotation from VV 1 to VV 2 ). As a result, the economy produces more cloth and less food and the equilibrium output shifts from Q 1 to Q 2.

95 95 RELATIVE PRICES AND DEMAND The value of an economy's consumption equals the value of its production: P C Q C + P F Q F = P C D C + P F D F = V Production and consumption must lie on the same isovalue line.

96 96 Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С TT D Production, Consumption, and Trade in the Standard Model Isovalue line Indifference curves Cloth exports Food imports The economy produces at point Q,. The economy consumes at point D. Q

97 97 Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С TT D Q Production, Consumption, and Trade in the Standard Model Isovalue line Indifference curves Cloth exports Food imports The economy produces more cloth than it consumes and therefore exports cloth; correspondingly, it consumes more food than it produces and therefore imports food.

98 98 Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С TT D1D1 Q1Q1 When that relative price rises all isovalue lines become steeper. The maximum-value line rotates from VV 1 to VV 2. Effects of a Rise in the Relative Price of Cloth Q2Q2 D2D2 V V 1 ( P C /P F ) 1 V V 2 ( P C /P F ) 2

99 99 Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С TT D1D1 Effects of a Rise in the Relative Price of Cloth V V 1 ( P C /P F ) 1 V V 2 ( P C /P F ) 2 The economy produces more C and less F, shifting production shifts from Q 1 to Q 2 The economy's consumption choice shifts from D 1 to D 2 Q1Q1 D2D2 Q2Q2 The economy produces more C and less F, shifting production from Q 1 to Q 2

100 100 Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С TT D1D1 The move from D 1 to D 2 reflects two effects of the rise in P C /P F V V 1 ( P C /P F ) 1 V V 2 ( P C /P F ) 2 1) the economy has moved to a higher indifference curve: It is better off. The reason is that this economy is an exporter of cloth. Q1Q1 D2D2 Q2Q2

101 101 Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q С TT D1D1 The move from D 1 to D 2 reflects two effects of the rise in P C /P F V V 1 ( P C /P F ) 1 V V 2 ( P C /P F ) 2 2) the change in relative prices leads to a shift towards consumption of more food Q1Q1 2) the change in relative prices leads to a shift towards consumption of more food. D2D2 Q2Q2

102 102 Consumer goods production, Q C Oil production, Q О TT D1D1 Q1Q1 Effects of a Rise in the Relative Price of Oil Q2Q2 D2D2 V V 1 ( P O /P C ) 1 V V 2 ( P O /P C ) 2 case

103 103 THE WELFARE EFFECT OF CHANGES IN THE TERMS OF TRADE When P C /P F increases, a country that initially exports cloth is made better off, as illustrated by the movement from D 1 to D 2. Conversely, if P C /P F were to decline, the country would be made worse off; for example, consumption might move back from D 2 to D 1.

104 104 THE WELFARE EFFECT OF CHANGES IN THE TERMS OF TRADE The general statement, then, is that a rise in the terms of trade increases a country's welfare, while a decline in the terms of trade reduces its welfare.

105 105 RS RD (P C /P F ) 1 Relative quantity of cloth, Relative price of cloth, P C /P F Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F * 1 World Relative Supply and Demand 1) An increase in P C /P F leads both countries to produce more cloth and less food. 2) An increase in P C /P F leads both countries to shift their consumption mix away from cloth toward food.

106 106 Now we can use RS, RD and the ToT to understand a number of important issues in international economics.

107 107 ECONOMIC GROWTH: A SHIFT OF THE RS CURVE The effects of economic growth in a trading world economy are a source of concern around two questions: –is economic growth in other countries good or bad for our nation? –is growth in a country more or less valuable when that nation is part of a closely integrated world economy?

108 108 The effects of growth “+”“-” at home on other economies in other countries on home economy

109 109 The effects of growth at home On one hand, growth in an economy's production capacity should be more valuable when that country can sell some of its increased production to the world market. On the other hand, the benefits of growth may be passed on to foreigners in the form of lower prices for the country's exports rather than retained at home.

110 110 The effects of growth in other countries On one side, economic growth in the rest of the world may be good for our economy because it means larger markets for our exports. On the other side, growth in other countries may mean increased competition for our exporters.

111 111 The standard model of trade provides a framework that can clarify the effects of economic growth in a trading world.

112 112 GROWTH AND THE PRODUCTION POSSIBILITY FRONTIER This growth can result either from increases in a country's resources or from improvements in the efficiency with which these resources are used. growth typically has a biasThe international trade effects of growth result from the fact that such growth typically has a bias.

113 113 Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q C TT 1 TT 2 Biased Growth Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q C TT 1 TT 2 b) growth biased toward fooda) growth biased toward cloth Growth is biased when it shifts production possibilities out more toward one good than toward another. In both cases the production possibility frontier shifts out from TT 1 to TT 2.

114 114 Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q C TT 1 TT 2 Biased Growth Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q C TT 1 TT 2 b) growth biased toward fooda) growth biased toward cloth In case (a) this shift is biased toward cloth. In case (b) this shift is biased toward food.

115 115 Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q C TT 1 TT 2 Biased Growth Food production, Q F Cloth production, Q C TT 1 TT 2 b) growth biased toward fooda) growth biased toward cloth In case (a) at an unchanged relative price of cloth the output of food actually falls. In case (b) at an unchanged relative price of cloth the output of cloth actually falls.

116 116 Growth may be biased for two main reasons: 1. The Ricardian model shows that technological progress in one sector of the economy will expand the economy's production possibilities more in the direction of that sector's output than in the direction of the other sector's output.

117 117 Growth may be biased for two main reasons: 2. The H-O Model showed that an increase in a country's supply of a factor of production — say, an increase in the capital stock resulting from saving and investment — will produce biased expansion of production possibilities.

118 118 RS 2 RD (P C /P F ) 2 (P C /P F ) 1 Relative price of cloth, P C /P F 1 2 RS 1 Growth and Relative Supply Relative quantity of cloth, Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F * a) Cloth-biased growth Suppose that Home experiences growth strongly biased toward cloth, so that its output of cloth rises at any given relative price of cloth, while its output of food declines.

119 119 RS 2 RD (P C /P F ) 2 (P C /P F ) 1 Relative price of cloth, P C /P F 1 2 RS 1 Growth and Relative Supply a) Cloth-biased growth Then for the world as a whole the output of cloth relative to food will rise at any given price and the world relative supply curve will shift to the right from RS 1 to RS 2. Relative quantity of cloth, Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F *

120 120 RS 2 RD (P C /P F ) 2 (P C /P F ) 1 Relative quantity of cloth, Relative price of cloth, P C /P F 1 2 RS 1 Growth and Relative Supply Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F * a) Cloth-biased growth This shift results in a decrease in the relative price of cloth from (P С /P F ) 1 to (P С /P F ) 2, a worsening of Home's terms of trade and an improvement in Foreign's terms of trade.

121 121 RS 2 RD (P C /P F ) 2 (P C /P F ) 1 Relative quantity of cloth, Relative price of cloth, P C /P F 1 2 RS 1 Growth and Relative Supply Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F * RS 1 RD (P C /P F ) 1 (P C /P F ) 2 Relative quantity of cloth, Relative price of cloth, P C /P F 1 2 RS 2 Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F * b) Food-biased growtha) Cloth-biased growth

122 122 RS 2 RD (P C /P F ) 2 (P C /P F ) 1 Relative quantity of cloth, Relative price of cloth, P C /P F 1 2 RS 1 Growth and Relative Supply Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F * RS 1 RD (P C /P F ) 1 (P C /P F ) 2 Relative quantity of cloth, Relative price of cloth, P C /P F 1 2 RS 2 Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F * b) Food-biased growtha) Cloth-biased growth Notice that the important consideration here is not which economy Grows but the bias of the growth.

123 123 Growth and Relative Supply RS 1 RD (P C /P F ) 1 (P C /P F ) 2 Relative quantity of cloth, Relative price of cloth, P C /P F 1 2 RS 2 Qc + Qc* Q F + Q F * b) Food-biased growth Either Home or Foreign growth biased toward food leads to a leftward shift of the RS curve (RS 1 to RS 2 ) and thus to a rise in the relative price of cloth from (P С /P F ) 1 to (P С /P F ) 2. This increase is an improvement in Home's terms of trade, a worsening of Foreign's.

124 124 Growth that disproportionately expands a country's production possibilities in the direction of the good it exports (cloth in Home, food in Foreign) is export-biased growth. Similarly, growth biased toward the good a country imports is import-biased growth.

125 125 Our analysis leads to the following general principle: Export-biased growth tends to worsen a growing country's terms of trade, to the benefit of the rest of the world; Import-biased growth tends to improve a growing country's terms of trade at the rest of the world's expense.

126 126 INTERNATIONAL EFFECTS OF GROWTH We are now able to resolve our questions about the international effects of growth. Is growth in the rest of the world good or bad for our country? Does the fact that our country is part of a trading world economy increase or decrease the benefits of growth?

127 127 export-biased growth in the rest of the world is good for us, improving our terms of trade, while import-biased growth abroad worsens our terms of trade.

128 128 Export-biased growth in our own country worsens our terms of trade, reducing the direct benefits of growth, while import-biased growth leads to an improvement of our terms of trade, a secondary benefit.

129 129 Economies of scale and international trade

130 130 There are two reasons why countries specialize and trade: 1.countries differ either in their resources or in technology and specialize in the things they do relatively well; 2.economies of scale (or increasing returns) make it advantageous for each country to specialize in the production of only a limited range of goods and services.

131 131 Relationship between inputs and output of a hypothetical industry Output (a) Total labor input (b) Average labor input (b/a)

132 132 International trade plays a crucial role: It makes it possible for each country to produce a restricted range of goods and to take advantage of economies of scale without sacrificing variety in consumption.

133 133 Mutually beneficial trade can arise as a result of economies of scale. Each country specializes in producing a limited range of products, which enables it to produce these goods more efficiently than if it tried to produce everything for itself. Specialized economies then trade with each other to be able to consume the full range of goods.

134 134 External economies of scale occur when the cost per unit depends on the size of the industry but not necessarily on the size of any one firm. Internal economies of scale occur when the cost per unit depends on the size of an individual firm but not necessarily on that of the industry.

135 135 External and internal economies of scale have different implications for the structure of industries. –An industry where economies of scale are purely external will typically be perfectly competitive. –Internal economies of scale lead to an imperfectly competitive market structure. Both external and internal economies of scale are important causes of international trade.

136 136 THE EFFECTS OF INCREASED MARKET SIZE In our contemporary world –both the variety of goods that a country can produce –and the scale of its production are constrained by the size of the market. By trading with each other, and therefore forming an integrated world market, nations are able to loosen these constraints.

137 137 Effects of a Larger Market CC 1 CC 2 Number of firms, n Cost, C and Price, P PP 1 2 n1n1 n2n2 P1P1 P2P2 An increase in the size of the market allows each firm, other things equal, to produce more and thus have lower average cost. The more firms there are in monopolistically industry the lower the output of each firm, and thus the higher its average cost per unit of output.

138 138 Equilibrium in the Automobile Market CC Number of firms, n Price per auto in thousands USD PP (a) The Home market Figure shows the PP and CC curves for the Home auto industry. In the absence of trade when the market is for auto Home would have 6 automobile firms, selling at a price of $10,000 each.

139 139 Equilibrium in the Automobile Market CC Number of firms, n Price per auto in thousands USD PP (b) The Foreign market Figure shows the PP and CC curves for the Foreign auto industry. In the absence of trade when the market is for 1.6 million auto Foreign would have 8 automobile firms, selling at a price of $ 8750 each.

140 140 Equilibrium in the Automobile Market CC Number of firms, n Price per auto in thousands USD PP (c) Integrated Figure shows the PP and CC curves for combined market. Integrating the two markets creates a market for 2.5 million autos. This market supports 10 firms, and the price of an auto is only $8000.

141 141 ECONOMIES OF SCALE AND COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE How economies of scale interact with comparative advantage to determine the pattern of international trade. Let us imagine a world economy consisting, as usual, of our two countries Home and Foreign. Each of these countries has two factors of production, capital and labor.

142 142 Trade in a world without increasing return Home (capital- abundant) Foreign labor-abundant) Manufactures Food The length of the arrows indicates the value of trade in each direction; so Home would export manufactures equal in value to the food it imports.

143 143 Trade with increasing return and monopolistic competition Home (capital- abundant) Foreign labor-abundant) Manufactures Food Because of economies of scale, neither country is able to produce the full range of manufactured products by itself; thus they will be producing different things. Interindustry trade Intraindustry trade Home will be a net exporter of manufactures and an importer of food.

144 144 Trade with increasing return and monopolistic competition Home (capital- abundant) Foreign labor-abundant) Manufactures Food Because of economies of scale, neither country is able to produce the full range of manufactured products by itself; thus they will be producing different things. Interindustry trade Intraindustry trade Home, although running a trade surplus in manufactures, will import as well as export within the manufacturing industry.

145 145 Trade with increasing return and monopolistic competition Home (capital- abundant) Foreign labor-abundant) Manufactures Food Because of economies of scale, neither country is able to produce the full range of manufactured products by itself; thus they will be producing different things. Interindustry trade Intraindustry trade Foreign firms in the manufacturing sector will produce products different from those that Home firms produce.

146 146 World trade in a monopolistic competition model consists of two parts. There will be two-way trade within the manufacturing sector. This exchange of manufactures for manufactures is called intraindustry trade. The remainder of trade is an exchange of manufactures for food called interindustry trade.

147 147 Interindustry (manufactures for food) trade reflects comparative advantage. The pattern of interindustry trade is that Home, the capital-abundant country, is a net exporter of capital-intensive manufactures and a net importer of labor-intensive food. So comparative advantage continues to be a major part of the trade story. Four points about this pattern of trade:

148 148 Intraindustry trade does not reflect comparative advantage. Even if the countries had the same overall capital- labor ratio, their firms would continue to produce differentiated products. Thus economies of scale can be an independent source of international trade. Four points about this pattern of trade:

149 149 The pattern of intraindustry trade itself is unpredictable. All we know is that the countries will produce different products. Since history and accident determine the details of the trade pattern, an unpredictable component of the trade pattern is an inevitable feature of a world where economies of scale are important. Four points about this pattern of trade:

150 150 The relative importance of intraindustry and interindustry trade depends on how similar countries are. If, for instance, Home and Foreign are similar in their capital-labor ratios, then there will be little interindustry trade, and intraindustry trade, based ultimately on economies of scale, will be dominant. Four points about this pattern of trade:

151 151 THE SIGNIFICANCE OF INTRAINDUSTRY TRADE About 1/4 of world trade consists of intraindustry trade. The industrial countries have become increasingly similar in their levels of technology and in the availability of capital and skilled labor. There is often no clear comparative advantage within an industry, and much of international trade therefore takes the form of two-way exchanges within an industry.

152 152 Indexes of Intraindustry Trade for U.S. Industries Inorganic chemicals0.99 Power-generating machinery0.97 Electrical machinery0.96 Organic chemicals0.91 Medical and pharmaceutical0.86 Office machinery0.81 Telecommunications equipment0.69 Road vehicles0.65 Iron and steel0.43 Clothing and apparel0.27 Footwear0.20 intraindustry trade/total trade

153 153 The Theory of External Economies Economies of scale that occur at the level of the industry instead of the firm are called external economies. There are three main reasons why a cluster of firms may be more efficient than an individual firm in isolation: –Specialized suppliers –Labor market pooling –Knowledge spillovers What does it mean cluster?

154 154 Clusters: Definitions from the Cluster Literature Porter (1998) “A cluster is a geographically proximate group of interconnected companies and associated institutions in a particular field, linked by commonalities and complementarities”. Crouch and Farrell, (2001) “The more general concept of ‘cluster’ suggests something looser: a tendency for firms in similar types of business to locate close together, though without having a particularly important presence in an area.” Rosenfeld (1997) “A cluster is very simply used to represent concentrations of firms that are able to produce synergy because of their geographical proximity and interdependence, even though their scale of employment may not be pronounced or prominent.”

155 155 Clusters: Definitions from the Cluster Literature Roelandt and den Hertag (1999) “Clusters can be characterised as networks of producers of strongly interdependent firms (including specialised suppliers) linked each other in a value-adding production chain.” Swann and Prevezer (1998) “A cluster means a large group of firms in related industries at a particular location”. Simmie and Sennett (1999) “We define an innovative cluster as a large number of interconnected industrial and/or service companies having a high degree of collaboration, typically through a supply chain, and operating under the same market conditions.”

156 156 In many industries, the production of goods and services and the development of new products requires the use of specialized equipment or support services. –An individual company does not provide a large enough market for these services to keep the suppliers in business. A localized industrial cluster can solve this problem by bringing together many firms that provide a large enough market to support specialized suppliers. –This phenomenon has been extensively documented in the semiconductor industry located in Silicon Valley. Specialized Suppliers

157 157 A cluster of firms can create a pooled market for workers with highly specialized skills. –It is an advantage for: Producers –They are less likely to suffer from labor shortages. Workers –They are less likely to become unemployed. Labor Market Pooling

158 158 Knowledge is one of the important input factors in highly innovative industries. –The specialized knowledge that is crucial to success in innovative industries comes from: Research and development efforts Reverse engineering Informal exchange of information and ideas Knowledge Spillovers

159 159 External Economies and the Pattern of Trade –A country that has large production in some industry will tend to have low costs of producing that good. –Countries that start out as large producers in certain industries tend to remain large producers even if some other country could potentially produce the goods more cheaply. External Economies and International Trade

160 160 External Economies and Specialization AC SWISS Q1Q1 P1P1 Price, cost (per watch) Quantity of watches produced and demanded AC THAI 2 1 C0C0 D Thailand could potentially supply the world market more cheaply than Switzerland. If the Swiss industry gets established first, however, it may be able to sell watches at the price P 1, which is below the cost C 0 that an individual Thai firm would face if it began production on its own.

161 161 Trade based on external economies has more ambiguous effects on national welfare than either trade based on comparative advantage or trade based on economies of scale at the level of the firm. Trade and Welfare with External Economies

162 162 Russia in a changing world What is a Russia’s role in current international division of labour? What may be a Russia’s role in a future international division of labour?


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