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5.1 EXAMINE THE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS KITCHEN DESIGNS, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY ON FOOD PREPARATION. 5.3 IDENTIFY SCIENCE PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PREPARATION.

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Presentation on theme: "5.1 EXAMINE THE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS KITCHEN DESIGNS, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY ON FOOD PREPARATION. 5.3 IDENTIFY SCIENCE PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PREPARATION."— Presentation transcript:

1 5.1 EXAMINE THE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS KITCHEN DESIGNS, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY ON FOOD PREPARATION. 5.3 IDENTIFY SCIENCE PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PREPARATION. State Standards

2 Journal  How often do you cook meals in the microwave? What are your favorite meals to cook in the microwave? Write one paragraph describing the use of your microwave at home.

3 Microwaving Cooking Techniques  The microwave oven has been around since  Microwaving is a fast, healthful way to cook.  Food cooks quickly with less fat and liquid than in most conventional methods.  More of the water-soluble vitamins are retained, and fewer vitamins are destroyed by heat.  The higher the power setting, the faster the cooking.

4 Microwave Power Levels DescriptionPercentage of Power High100 Medium-High70 Medium50 Medium-Low30 Low10

5 Power Settings  Microwave ovens vary in the amount of microwaves they produce at each setting because of different power ratings.  These ratings are based on units of electrical power called watts.  The higher the oven wattage, the more microwaves it produces at various settings. Compact models produce about 600 to 700 watts. Midsize and large models produce between 800 and 1,000 watts.

6 How Microwaves Cook  Microwaves cook by making food molecules vibrate.  The microwaves penetrate food to a depth of about 1 ½ inches (3.8 cm). There, they agitate food molecules and produce heat.

7 Food Composition  A food’s composition-what it is made of-affects the way it cooks in the microwave.  Foods high in water, such as vegetables, will cook faster than foods with a lower water content, such as meat.  Fat, sugar, and salt also attract microwaves; however, you must be careful when heating these items.  Ex. When warming up a jelly doughnut, the jelly will be superheated while the doughnut itself is only warm.  Concentrations of fat or sugar can create hot spots when exposed to microwaves.

8 Other Factors  Food density-denser the food, longer the cooking time.  Shape and size of food-uniform thickness cook most evenly. Small pieces cook faster than large ones.  Starting temperature of food-colder food is to start with, the longer it will take to cook. Thaw most frozen foods before microwaving except for vegetables.  Amount of food-the more food, the longer cooking time. One potato cooks quickly, but cooking four potatoes takes longer because they must share the microwaves.

9 Microwave Cookware  1. glass and glass-ceramic: use ovenproof glass and glass-ceramic for cooking.  2. Stoneware and pottery: most items are suitable for cooking unless they have metal trim. Avoid pottery with metallic glazes.  3. Plastic: use only plastic items that are marked “microwave-safe.”  4. Paper: use paper plates only if they are firm enough to hold food. Choose paper towels that are “microwave safe.”

10 Foods that should not be microwaved:  1. eggs in shells - they explode or burst when heat builds up.  2. pancakes - they don’t get a crust on them.  3. popcorn - not enough moisture in regular popcorn  4. canning foods - does not get high enough temperature or have enough  pressure.  5. deep-fry foods - fat temperature can not be controlled.  6. large amounts of food - takes too long, not as efficient

11 Food Placement  Best arrangement of food for microwaving is a ring shape. –allows microwaves to enter food from as many sides as possible.  Arrange foods for microwaving with the thickest or toughest parts toward the outside. Ex. Broccoli spears, place the tops toward the center and the stalks toward the outside. Food in center of microwave cooks more slowly.

12 Techniques for Microwaving  1. Stirring - To pull heated part of the food to the center.  2. Turning over - To microwave all sides.  3. Standing time - To allow the foods to complete its cooking (place directly on counter).  4. Shielding - Small pieces of foil used to cover wings or legs of poultry. (deflects microwaves away from that part).  5. Arrange food in circular shape - to make cooking even.

13 Techniques for Microwaving  6. Covering - a. Retains nutrients, b. Holds in moisture, c. Speeds up cooking. -Waxed paper and cooking parchment: waxed paper and cooking parchment prevent spatters and allow some steam and moisture to escape. -Paper towels: they absorb excess moisture and prevent spatters. Wrap rolls, breads, and sandwiches in paper towels before microwaving to keep them from becoming soggy.

14 Technique for Microwaving  7. Rotating - Makes cooking even.  8. Pricking - (egg yolks and potatoes) to keep from exploding.  9. Select foods of the same size - cooks evenly

15 Cooking Time  Microwave cooking has two parts: 1.) occurs when the oven is on and microwaves are being produced. 2.) after the oven turns off, the heat trapped inside of the food continues cooking. This is called standing time.

16 Microwave Recipes  Adapting a standard recipe for cooking in the microwave works best if you can find a similar microwave recipe.  A basic microwave cookbook can help you to microwave cook successfully.  Microwave cookbook specifies: The size and shape of the cooking container. How to arrange food for even cooking. Whether or not to cover the dish. A range of cooking and standing times.

17 Microwave Care and Accident Prevention  Never turn on the oven unless food is in it.  Follow manufacturer’s directions for preparing commercially frozen foods in the microwave.  Loosen tight-fitting covers or caps before microwaving. Otherwise, a buildup of steam pressure could cause the container to explode.  Never attach kitchen magnets to the microwave oven. They can affect the electronic controls.

18 Cleaning the Microwave Oven  Clean spots and spills after every use.  If allowed to build up, they will absorb microwaves and cut down on the cooking power.  Keep door seal clean  Spilled food allows bacteria to grow  To clean the interior of the oven, wipe it with a clean, wet dishcloth. Dry it thoroughly and do not use abrasive cleaners.


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