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FRAGMENTS - JUST PIECES OF THE SENTENCE PUZZLE! But sometimes they’re cool on their own!

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Presentation on theme: "FRAGMENTS - JUST PIECES OF THE SENTENCE PUZZLE! But sometimes they’re cool on their own!"— Presentation transcript:

1 FRAGMENTS - JUST PIECES OF THE SENTENCE PUZZLE! But sometimes they’re cool on their own!

2 Look for a subject (a noun or noun phrase) – like The detective. Look for a predicate (must contain a verb or verb phrase ) – like put together the pieces of the puzzle. If both exist, say the string of words aloud to see if they can stand alone. Try the following method recommended by Rei Noguchi: Test to see if a string of words is a sentence by turning it into a yes-no question (ex. “The detective put together the pieces of the puzzle” becomes “Did the detective put together the pieces of the puzzle?”) Or try turning the words into a tag question (ex. “The detective put together the pieces of thepuzzle, didn’t he?” If these two tests work, it’s a sentence! (Hagemann ) WHAT IF I CAN’T EVEN IDENTIFY A SENTENCE? The detective put together the pieces of the puzzle. OR This is a sentence!

3 WHAT IS A FRAGMENT? It’s punctuated like a sentence (starts with a capital letter/ends with punctuation), but it’s not a sentence! Instead, it is: A part of a sentence (word, phrase, or dependent clause) An incomplete thought It may be missing a subject or predicate Or It may have a subject and a predicate but it begins with a word or phrase that makes it dependent on something else to make it a complete thought.

4 FOR EXAMPLE WORD Detective!

5 FOR EXAMPLE PHRASE Pieces of the puzzle.

6 FOR EXAMPLE DEPENDENT CLAUSE Because of the detective.

7 WHAT’S SO BAD ABOUT FRAGMENTS? Well, that depends…

8 Fragments are the 12 th most common “error” in student writing. They may occur because the writer is writing the way he or she hears spoken language. They also occur when pieces of a sentence become disconnected by a period. They may occur when the writer confuses a dependent clause with an independent clause. Fragments are the 12 th most common “error” in student writing. They may occur because the writer is writing the way he or she hears spoken language. They also occur when pieces of a sentence become disconnected by a period. They may occur when the writer confuses a dependent clause with an independent clause. Fragments are most often seen as errors if the writing is done for a formal audience and purpose. Written language is often different from spoken language, especially in more formal situations. Many fragments can be corrected by reading the writing aloud, following punctuation exactly to locate errors. Many fragments can be eliminated by connecting a word, phrase or dependent clause to the preceding or following sentence. Fragments are most often seen as errors if the writing is done for a formal audience and purpose. Written language is often different from spoken language, especially in more formal situations. Many fragments can be corrected by reading the writing aloud, following punctuation exactly to locate errors. Many fragments can be eliminated by connecting a word, phrase or dependent clause to the preceding or following sentence. FRAGMENTS CAN CLOUD YOUR MEANING AND DISTRACT YOUR READER.

9 BUT, SOMETIMES… Fragments can add emphasis! You just need to know how and when to use them. Be cautious! In large doses, they can lose their punch.

10 A READER CAN TELL IF YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING. IF YOU CAN IDENTIFY THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A FRAGMENT AND A COMPLETE SENTENCE YOU ARE ON THE RIGHT TRACK. TRY THIS NEXT LITTLE PUZZLE ON YOUR OWN!

11 PUT A CHECK MARK IN THE BOX THAT IDENTIFIES THE WORDS AS A COMPLETE SENTENCE OR A FRAGMENT. Complete SentenceFragment The mystery puzzled the detectives. Although they had been working on the case for weeks. Detective Friday decided to build a jigsaw puzzle to relax. Didn’t work for him. Because the details kept popping into his head. Friday picked up one last piece before giving up. Eureka! The piece showed a picture of a red wagon in the rain. That was it! He knew who. Was the murderer.

12 NOW THAT YOU CAN IDENTIFY THEM, let’s see if you can fix them!

13  Just because you are smart.  Doesn’t mean you can solve every mystery.  Because mysteries are puzzles that require deduction.  Intuition and common sense.  Since the beginning of time.  Not until tomorrow.  A red wheelbarrow.  Running out of time.  Hooray!  Relaxed and in perfect form.  Trying to put it all together. Make these into complete sentences on your own paper!

14  An effective fragment punctuates a statement – it emphasizes a point or makes a bridge between two ideas. For example: She knew he had it in for her. Of course! She had known it all along.  A fragment error shows that the writer lacks control over the basic structure of a sentence. Fragment errors make meaning unclear or confusing because words, phrases or clauses stop in uncomfortable places. What’s the difference? EFFECTIVE FRAGMENT OR ERROR?

15 YOU ARE READY TO HANDLE FRAGMENTS ON YOUR OWN. You have the power to work with the pieces of the puzzle.


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