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I NTEGRATING B ULLY P REVENTION WITHIN SWPBIS George Sugai, University of Connecticut Rob Horner, University of Oregon

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Presentation on theme: "I NTEGRATING B ULLY P REVENTION WITHIN SWPBIS George Sugai, University of Connecticut Rob Horner, University of Oregon"— Presentation transcript:

1 I NTEGRATING B ULLY P REVENTION WITHIN SWPBIS George Sugai, University of Connecticut Rob Horner, University of Oregon

2 Objectives Define bully prevention need from national, state and district perspective Define how to build a bully prevention agenda within School-wide PBIS. Provide examples of states, districts working efficiently and effectively

3 A Context: Increasing national attention Whitehouse Forum on Bully Prevention (March, 2011) – Susan M. Swearer, University of Nebraska – Lincoln Risk Factors – Catherine P. Bradshaw, Johns Hopkins University Teachers are not prepared on procedures to respond to bullying – Justin W. Patchin, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Eau C Growing role of cyber-bullying – George Sugai, Ph.D., University of Connecticut Role of school-wide systems in preventing bullying – Dorothy L. Espelage, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Bullying and LGBT students; Students with disabilities.

4 4 The Logic: Why invest in Bully Prevention?  The National School Safety Center (NSSC) called bullying the most enduring and underrated problem in U.S. schools. (Beale, 2001)  Nearly 30 percent of students have reported being involved in bullying as either a perpetrator or a victim  (Cook, Williams, Guerra, & Kim, 2010; Nansel, et al., 2001; Swearer & Espelage, 2004).  Victims and perpetrators of bullying are more likely to skip and/or drop out of school. (Berthold & Hoover, 2000; Neary & Joseph, 1994)  Victims and perpetrators of bullying are more likely to suffer from underachievement and sub-potential performance in employment settings. (Carney & Merrell, 2001; NSSC, 1995).

5 What is Bullying? “Bullying” is repeated aggression, harassment, threats or intimidation when one person has greater status, or power than the other.” Examples: 5

6 The Challenge A growing array of bully prevention procedures (packages) are available IMPLEMENTATION – Creating something NEW is expensive – Using what you already do well is essential – Focus on core features… add what you need. – Always build data systems to assess and improve

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9 Why SWPBS?

10 SWPBS is

11 SYSTEMS “BULLY BEHAVIOR” PRACTICES DATA Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Student Behavior OUTCOMES Supporting Social Competence & Academic Achievement Supporting Decision Making Integrated Elements

12 RtI Reducing Bullying

13 Redesign of teaching environments…not students

14 All Some Few Continuum of Support for ALL Dec 7, 2007

15 Continuum of Support for “Manuella” Dec 7, 2007 Harassment Computer Lab Social Studies Physical Intimidation Adult Relations. Attendance Literacy Label behavior…not people

16 SWIS Definition of Bullying Behavior

17 Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C. W., Thornton, L. A., & Leaf, P. J. (2009). Altering school climate through school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Findings from a group- randomized effectiveness trial. Prevention Science, 10(2), Bradshaw, C. P., Koth, C. W., Bevans, K. B., Ialongo, N., & Leaf, P. J. (2008). The impact of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the organizational health of elementary schools. School Psychology Quarterly, 23(4), Bradshaw, C. P., Mitchell, M. M., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Examining the effects of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on student outcomes: Results from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 12, Bradshaw, C. P., Reinke, W. M., Brown, L. D., Bevans, K. B., & Leaf, P. J. (2008). Implementation of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in elementary schools: Observations from a randomized trial. Education & Treatment of Children, 31, Horner, R., Sugai, G., Smolkowski, K., Eber, L., Nakasato, J., Todd, A., & Esperanza, J., (2009). A randomized, wait-list controlled effectiveness trial assessing school-wide positive behavior support in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 11, Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (2010). Examining the evidence base for school-wide positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality, 42(8), Waasdorp, T. E., Bradshaw, C. P., & Leaf, P. J. (in press). The impact of school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (SWPBIS) on bullying and peer rejection: A randomized controlled effectiveness trial. RCT & Group Design PBIS Studies Reduced major disciplinary infractions Improvements in academic achievement Enhanced perception of organizational health & safety Improved school climate Reductions in teacher reported bullying behavior & peer rejection

18 Integrated PBIS Response to Bullying

19 SWPBS look at bullying behavior

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21 Victim attention Bystander attention Self-delivered praise Tangible access

22 PREVENTION De-emphasis on adding consequence for problem behavior

23 Context or Setting Context or Setting Initiator Target Bystander Staff Continuum of Behavior Fluency

24 Is Behavior an Issue?

25 4 basic strategies….if you do nuthin’ else….

26 Give Priority to Effective Practices

27 MUST….. Be easy & do-able by all Be contextually relevant Result in early disengagement Increase predictability Be pre-emptive Be teachable Be brief

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30 Allday & Pakurar (2007)

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32 Name______________________________Date_____________ Setting □ Hallway □ Entrance □ Cafeteria □ Playground □ Other_______________ Time Start_________ Time End _________ Tally each Positive Student ContactsTotal # Ratio of Positives to Negatives: _____: 1 Tally each Negative Student ContactsTotal # Non-Classroom Management: Self-Assessment

33 1.Did I have at least 4 positive for 1 negative student contacts? Yes No 2. Did I move throughout the area I was supervising? Yes No 3. Did I frequently scan the area I was supervising? Yes No 4. Did I positively interact with most of the students in the area? Yes No 5. Did I handle most minor rule violations quickly and quietly? Yes No 6. Did I follow school procedures for handling major rule violations? Yes No 7. Do I know our school-wide expectations (positively stated rules)? Yes No 8. Did I positively acknowledge at least 5 different students for displaying our school-wide expectations? Yes No Overall active supervision score: 7-8 “yes” = “Super Supervision” 5-6 “yes” = “So-So Supervision” <5 “yes” = “Improvement Needed” # Yes______

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35 Big idea: Use PBIS framework to address bully behavior prevention


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