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Lesson 19 Joseph C. Blumenthal. As its name suggests, a noun clause is a clause that is used as a _____. We have now completed our study of adverb and.

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson 19 Joseph C. Blumenthal. As its name suggests, a noun clause is a clause that is used as a _____. We have now completed our study of adverb and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lesson 19 Joseph C. Blumenthal

2 As its name suggests, a noun clause is a clause that is used as a _____. We have now completed our study of adverb and adjective clauses. We turn next to the third (and last) type of clause—the noun clause.

3 As its name suggests, a noun clause is a clause that is used as a noun. We have now completed our study of adverb and adjective clauses. We turn next to the third (and last) type of clause—the noun clause.

4 We have seen that adverb and adjective clauses offer almost endless possibilities for showing the various kinds of rel________ that exist among our ideas.

5 We have seen that adverb and adjective clauses offer almost endless possibilities for showing the various kinds of relationship that exist among our ideas.

6 We use noun clauses so naturally that we study them mainly to complete out picture of three kinds of clauses that we find in (compound, complex) sentences.

7 complex We use noun clauses so naturally that we study them mainly to complete out picture of three kinds of clauses that we find in (compound, complex) sentences.

8 Since noun clauses are used exactly as nouns, let us review the various ways in which nouns are used. His remark puzzled us. The noun remark is the subject of the verb _______.

9 Since noun clauses are used exactly as nouns, let us review the various ways in which nouns are used. His remark puzzled us. puzzled. The noun remark is the subject of the verb puzzled.

10 The clause What he said does the same job in sentence b that the noun remark does in sentence a. It is therefore a _____ clause. a. His remark puzzled us. b. What he said puzzled us.

11 The clause What he said does the same job in sentence b that the noun remark does in sentence a. It is therefore a noun clause. a. His remark puzzled us. b. What he said puzzled us.

12 When we omit the noun clause in this sentence, does a complete sentence remain? (yes, no) What he said puzzled us. We have seen that when we omit an adverb or adjective clause, we still have a grammatically complete sentence remaining.

13 When we omit the noun clause in this sentence, does a complete sentence remain? (yes, no) What he said puzzled us. We have seen that when we omit an adverb or adjective clause, we still have a grammatically complete sentence remaining.

14 In this sentence the noun vegetables is the direct object of the verb ____. We raise vegetables.

15 raise. In this sentence the noun vegetables is the direct object of the verb raise. We raise vegetables.

16 The noun clause whatever we need in sentence b is used just like the direct object _________ in sentence a. a. We raise vegetables. b. We raise whatever we need.

17 The noun clause whatever we need in sentence b is used just like the direct object vegetables in sentence a. a. We raise vegetables. b. We raise whatever we need.

18 When we omit the noun clause in this sentence, does a complete sentence remain? (yes, no) We raise whatever we need.

19 When we omit the noun clause in this sentence, does a complete sentence remain? (yes, no) We raise whatever we need.

20 If we omitted the noun clause, the sentence would lack a (subject, direct object). We raise (whatever we need).

21 If we omitted the noun clause, the sentence would lack a (subject, direct object). We raise (whatever we need).

22 The indirect object in the above sentence is the noun _____. She will pay the finder a reward. An indirect object precedes the direct object and shows to whom (or to what) or for whom (or for what) something is done.

23 The indirect object in the above sentence is the noun finder. She will pay the finder a reward. An indirect object precedes the direct object and shows to whom (or to what) or for whom (or for what) something is done.

24 Which four-word noun clause in sentence b takes the place of the indirect object finder in sentence a? a. She will pay the finder reward. b. She will pay whoever finds the dog a reward.

25 Which four-word noun clause in sentence b takes the place of the indirect object finder in sentence a? a. She will pay the finder reward. b. She will pay whoever finds the dog a reward.

26 If we omit the clause in the above sentence, does a complete sentence remain? (yes, no) An indirect object is not an essential part of the sentence framework. She will pay whoever finds the dog a reward.

27 yes If we omit the clause in the above sentence, does a complete sentence remain? (yes, no) She will pay whoever finds the dog a reward. An indirect object is not an essential part of the sentence framework.

28 Both are used as (subject compliments, direct objects). a. This is my recipe for fudge. b. This is how I make fudge. is Both the noun clause how I make fudge in sentence b and the noun recipe in sentence a complete the meaning of the linking verb is.

29 Both are used as (subject compliments, direct objects). a. This is my recipe for fudge. b. This is how I make fudge. is Both the noun clause how I make fudge in sentence b and the noun recipe in sentence a complete the meaning of the linking verb is.

30 This is (how I make fudge). We cannot omit the noun clause because we should lose an essential part of the sentence framework. The part we would lose is the (subject, direct object, subject compliment).

31 This is (how I make fudge). subject compliment We cannot omit the noun clause because we should lose an essential part of the sentence framework. The part we would lose is the (subject, direct object, subject compliment).

32 We were still ten miles from our destination. The noun destination is the object of the preposition _____.

33 We were still ten miles from our destination. from The noun destination is the object of the preposition from.

34 a. We were still ten miles from our destination. b. We were still ten miles from where we were going. In sentence a, the noun destination is the object of the preposition from. What is the noun clause in sentence b that is the object of the preposition from?

35 a. We were still ten miles from our destination. b. We were still ten miles from where we were going. In sentence a, the noun destination is the object of the preposition from. What is the noun clause in sentence b that is the object of the preposition from?

36 We were still ten miles from (where we were going). We cannot omit the noun clause because the preposition from would be without an _____.

37 We were still ten miles from (where we were going). object We cannot omit the noun clause because the preposition from would be without an object.

38 Our last hope, rescue by the Marines, was soon to be realized. The appositive rescue, with its modifiers, follows and explains the noun _____. An appositive is a noun or pronoun set after another noun or pronoun to explain it.

39 Our last hope, rescue by the Marines, was soon to be realized. hope The appositive rescue, with its modifiers, follows and explains the noun hope. An appositive is a noun or pronoun set after another noun or pronoun to explain it.

40 a. Our last hope, rescue by the Marines, was soon to be realized. b. Our last hope, that the Marines would rescue us, was soon to be realized. The noun clause in sentence b does the same job as the appositive ______ in sentence a.

41 a. Our last hope, rescue by the Marines, was soon to be realized. b. Our last hope, that the Marines would rescue us, was soon to be realized. The noun clause in sentence b does the same job as the appositive rescue in sentence a.

42 a. Our last hope, that the Marines would rescue us, was soon to be realized. b. Our last hope…was soon to be realized. When we omit the noun clause used as an appositive, does a complete sentence remain? (yes, no)

43 a. Our last hope, that the Marines would rescue us, was soon to be realized. b. Our last hope…was soon to be realized. yes When we omit the noun clause used as an appositive, does a complete sentence remain? (yes, no)

44 A noun clause is generally an essential part of the sentence framework and cannot be omitted. The only exceptions are noun clauses used as indirect objects or as appositives. If a noun clause is used as a subject, direct object, subject complement, or object of a preposition, it (can, cannot) be omitted.

45 cannot A noun clause is generally an essential part of the sentence framework and cannot be omitted. The only exceptions are noun clauses used as indirect objects or as appositives. If a noun clause is used as a subject, direct object, subject complement, or object of a preposition, it (can, cannot) be omitted.

46 A noun clause is a clause that is used in any way that a _____ can be used.

47 noun A noun clause is a clause that is used in any way that a noun can be used.

48 that, whether, what, how, why The words that, whether, what, how, and why are often used as clause signals to start noun clauses. That anyone should believe this rumor is absurd. The noun clause begins with the word ___ and ends with the word _____.

49 that, whether, what, how, why The words that, whether, what, how, and why are often used as clause signals to start noun clauses. That anyone should believe this rumor is absurd. The noun clause begins with the word that and ends with the word rumor.

50 That anyone should believe this rumor is absurd. The noun clause in the above sentence is used as the ______ of the verb is.

51 That anyone should believe this rumor is absurd. The noun clause in the above sentence is used as the subject of the verb is.

52 A lie detector shows whether you are telling the truth. The noun clause begins with the word _______ and ends with the word _____.

53 A lie detector shows whether you are telling the truth. The noun clause begins with the word whether and ends with the word truth.

54 A lie detector shows whether you are telling the truth. The noun clause is used as the ____________of the verb shows.

55 A lie detector shows whether you are telling the truth. The noun clause is used as the (direct) object of the verb shows.

56 You can depend on whatever he tells you. The noun clause begins with the word ________ and ends with the word ___.

57 You can depend on whatever he tells you. whatever you The noun clause begins with the word whatever and ends with the word you.

58 Write the following answers on your own sheet of paper.

59 This tiny spring is what powers the watch. The noun clause begins with the word 1. ________ and ends with the word 2.________.

60 This tiny spring is what powers the watch. The noun clause in this sentence completes the meaning of the linking verb is and is used as a 3.(subject complement, direct object).

61 Some of the same clause signals that start adverb and adjective clauses can also start noun clauses; for example, if, when, where, who, and which. If the clause is an essential part of the sentence that cannot be omitted, it is 4. (an adverb, and adjective, a noun) clause.

62 a. The bus that the train delayed was an hour late. b. We found that a train had delayed the bus. One clause is an adjective clause that can be omitted; the other is a noun clause that is an essential part of the sentence framework. Which sentence contains the noun clause? 5. (a, b)

63 We found that a train had delayed the bus. 6. The noun clause cannot be omitted because it is the (subject, direct object) of the verb found.

64 a. Where Captain Kidd buried his treasure remains a mystery. b. No one has yet discovered the place where Captain Kidd buried his treasure. Which sentence contains a noun clause? 7. (a, b)

65 Where Captain Kidd buried his treasure remains a mystery. The noun clause is the 8. _______ of the verb remains.

66 a. The bike which I liked best was too expensive. b. I could not decide which I liked best. Which sentence contains a noun clause? 9. (a, b)

67 a. I have a tame crow that (=crow) can talk. b. Mother said that she was ready. Which sentence contains a noun clause? 10. (a, b) When that starts an adjective clause, it is a relative pronoun. Then that starts a noun clause, it is an “empty” word that merely signals the start of a noun clause.

68 I knew (that) we would win. I hope (that) you can go. Is the clause signal that a relative pronoun that stands for any noun in the other part of a sentence? 11.(yes, no) The “empty” word that, which starts many noun clauses, is often omitted when the clause is a direct object.

69 You are done!!!


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