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1 TrIn 3101: Introduction to Interpreting Unit 2: The Interpreter’s Role.

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Presentation on theme: "1 TrIn 3101: Introduction to Interpreting Unit 2: The Interpreter’s Role."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 TrIn 3101: Introduction to Interpreting Unit 2: The Interpreter’s Role

2 2 Reading texts* for next week: Downing, B. pp pp Condon pp González pp , Mikkelson pp *Please write your 6 thought questions on the cards provided and return them to the instructor. On each card, include the author’s name for each article from which you thought of the question. Include your name also, pls.

3 3 Unit 2: Goals Describe the basic role of the interpreter and give examples to illustrate what the role entails and what it does not entail. Compare and contrast the dynamics of an interview when the interpreter is a child, a family member, an untrained interpreter, and a trained professional interpreter. Compare and contrast the dynamics of an interview when the professional and the client are knowledgeable about the role of an interpreter and when they are not. Explain the rationale for the standard use of the first person (“I”) when interpreting.

4 4 Video: The Professional Interpreter (vignette #1: lawyer’s office) 1. Who is the interpreter? 2. How are the parties addressed? 3. Is the interpreter prepared? 4. Were introductions made? 5. Where is the interpreter positioned? 6. Which interpreting mode was used? 7. Which inappropriate roles were noted? 8. Was there awareness of cultural dimensions? 9. Did the interpreter ask for clarification and pauses when needed? 10. Was the interpreter aware of his/her own limitations and biases? 1. Family member, untrained person, professional 2. I, you, he/she 3. YesNo 4. YesNo 5. Beside, behind, hidden from client 6. Simultaneous, consecutive, summary 7. Editing, giving advice, adding information 8. YesNo 9. YesNo 10. YesNo

5 5 Video: The Professional Interpreter 11. Did the interpreter use eye contact and the first person (all statements with “I”) in addressing the parties? 12. Does the interpreter treat all parties with respect? 13. Is the interpreter sensitive to ethical issues as they arise? Explain. 14. Was the interpreting done accurately and completely? Comments: 11. YesNo 12. YesNo 13. YesNo 14. YesNo

6 6 Video: The Professional Interpreter (vignettes #2 -3: medical doctor’s office) 1. Who is the interpreter? 2. How are the parties addressed? 3. Is the interpreter prepared? 4. Were introductions made? 5. Where is the interpreter positioned? 6. Which interpreting mode was used? 7. Which inappropriate roles were noted? 8. Was there awareness of cultural dimensions? 9. Did the interpreter ask for clarification and pauses when needed? 10. Was the interpreter aware of his/her own limitations and biases? 1. Family member, untrained person, professional 2. I, you, he/she 3. YesNo 4. YesNo 5. Beside, behind, hidden from client 6. Simultaneous, consecutive, summary 7. Editing, giving advice, adding information 8. YesNo 9. YesNo 10. YesNo

7 7 Video: The Professional Interpreter 11. Did the interpreter use eye contact and the first person (all statements with “I”) in addressing the parties? 12. Does the interpreter treat all parties with respect? 13. Is the interpreter sensitive to ethical issues as they arise? Explain. 14. Was the interpreting done accurately and completely? Comments: 11. YesNo 12. YesNo 13. YesNo 14. YesNo

8 8 Application 2-1: brief look at the interpreter’s role 1. Preparation 2. Introductions 3. Seating arrangements 4. Mode selection 5. Communication of message 6. Inappropriate roles

9 9 1. Preparation Determine the purpose of the interview. Discuss any paper forms that may be used. Discuss in advance any terms that may be unfamiliar or difficult to interpret. Have a note pad and 2 pens ready.

10 10 2. Introductions The interpreter should always introduce her/himself briefly and familiarize both parties with the interpreter’s role. Class: What aspects of the interpreter’s role should be included if the interpreter has 30 seconds to introduce him/herself?

11 11 3. Seating arrangements The interpreter needs to make a quick but well-informed decision about spatial and seating arrangements. The patient/client is the center of attention-- not the interpreter. The patient has a right to privacy so the interpreter may need to work “behind the scenes.” Class: What other considerations must be taken into account?

12 12 4. Mode selection Decide the predominant mode to be used. Under which circumstances might the interpreter decide to use the following modes: – Consecutive – Simultaneous – Sight translation – Summary paraphrase (?)

13 13 5. Communication The interpreter’s role is to communicate messages across languages and cultures accurately, not to edit (add or delete), summarize, or embellish (“improve”). The interpreter is responsible for an appropriate interpretation, NOT for the decisions that clients and providers make.

14 14 6. Inappropriate roles The interpreter does not: – give his/her own opinion – counsel – advise – nor make decisions for the client. Class: Can you think of any other inappropriate roles?

15 15 More roles Cultural dimensions 8. Communication flow 9. Awareness of limitations, biases 10. Direct communication 11. Acceptance of assignments

16 16 7. Cultural dimensions The interpreter must be well aware of the cultural dimensions of each interpreted interview. Class: List a few cultural dimensions.

17 17 8. Communication flow The interpreter manages the flow of communication. The interpreter will ask for clarification and pauses as needed in order to fully understand, process and convey the message.

18 18 9. Limitations and biases Each interpreter needs to be very aware of his/her own skills, biases, and limitations, and not let these factors interfere with the interpreted encounter. Class: List possible biases and limitations. – Abortion, death and dying, language specialty, terminology

19 Direct communication Through eye contact, positioning and the use of the first person form of address, the interpreter encourages the two parties to communicate with each other as directly as possible. The interpreter may use the 3 rd person when referring to self or to differentiate between speakers. Note: 1 st person = I 2 nd person = you 3 rd person = he or she Class: Why should all parties in an interview use the first person form of address “I”?

20 Accepting assignments The interpreter accepts assignments that are appropriate for his/her own skill level and knows what to do when a situation becomes too difficult for his/her skill level. Class: What should the interpreter do if s/he realizes the assignment is too difficult after the interpretation has already started?

21 21 And more roles Show of dignity and respect 13. Continuous development 14. Adherence to ethical principles 15. Accurate and complete interpretation

22 Dignity and respect The interpreter personally treats the parties involved with dignity and respect. And... as a professional “team member”, the interpreter deserves to be treated respectfully by all parties as well.

23 Professional development The interpreter continues to develop his/her skills and knowledge. Class: Suggest a list of concrete ways that specific skills and knowledge might be developed.

24 Ethical principles The interpreter strictly adheres to ethical principles. Class: Give an example of an important ethical principle for an interpreter.

25 Accurate/complete interpretation The interpreter is responsible for providing an accurate and complete interpretation. The interpreter is not responsible for solving the problems of the client or the provider.

26 26 Activity 2-2: Discussion in groups A situation will be assigned to each student. As a small group, decide how the interpreter should manage each situation. 1. What is the interpreter’s role? 2. What is the use of good judgment and common sense? 3. What are the interpreter’s options and consequences of each? 4. Choose the best response and discuss effective ways of communicating your response. 5. Jot down your ideas for handling each situation and keep them in your notebook for later.

27 27 Thought question 1 (post Activity 2-2) Would your response to any of the situations differ if the client were a recent immigrant who had never visited an American hospital or clinic and/or had never worked with an interpreter before?

28 28 Thought question 2 Could any of these situations have been avoided or minimized by including certain information in your introduction or pre-meeting with the client(s)?

29 29 Thought question 3 How might the interpreter not “block” communication? Keep in mind that the statement “That’s not my role.” is not an effective response. What are better options?

30 30 Homework for 9/22/04 Read the following articles: – Vásquez pp – The Interpreting Process pp – General Issues pp Write one thought question for each article (due next week). Have a good week!


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