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FatMax 2007. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5.

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Presentation on theme: "FatMax 2007. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5."— Presentation transcript:

1 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Data, Information & Knowledge 1

2 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Data Data are raw facts and figures that on their own have no meaning These can be any alphanumeric characters i.e. text, numbers, symbols Note the “are” bit above? What does this mean?

3 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Data Examples Yes, Yes, No, Yes, No, Yes, No, Yes 42, 63, 96, 74, 56, , None of the above data sets have any meaning until they are given a CONTEXT and PROCESSED into a useable form

4 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Data Into Information To achieve its aims the organisation will need to process data into information. Data needs to be turned into meaningful information and presented in its most useful format Data must be processed in a context in order to give it meaning

5 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Information Data that has been processed within a context to give it meaning OR Data that has been processed into a form that gives it meaning

6 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Examples In the next 3 examples explain how the data could be processed to give it meaning What information can then be derived from the data? Suggested answers are given at the end of this presentation

7 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Example 1 Yes, Yes, No, Yes, No, Yes, No, Yes, No, Yes, Yes Raw Data Context Responses to the market research question – “Would you buy brand x at price y?” Information ??? Processing

8 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Example 2 Raw Data Context Information 42, 63, 96, 74, 56, 86 Jayne’s scores in the six AS/A2 ICT modules ??? Processing

9 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Example 3 Raw Data Context Information , The previous and current readings of a customer’s gas meter ??? Processing

10 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Exam Tip You’ll nearly always be asked to give examples of data processed into information Don’t use: Traffic lights Dates of birth

11 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Knowledge Knowledge is the understanding of rules needed to interpret information “…the capability of understanding the relationship between pieces of information and what to actually do with the information” Debbie Jones –

12 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Knowledge Examples Using the 3 previous examples: A Marketing Manager could use this information to decide whether or not to raise or lower price y Jayne’s teacher could analyse the results to determine whether it would be worth her re-sitting a module Looking at the pattern of the customer’s previous gas bills may identify that the figure is abnormally low and they are fiddling the gas meter!!!

13 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Knowledge Workers Knowledge workers have specialist knowledge that makes them “experts” Based on formal and informal rules they have learned through training and experience Examples include doctors, managers, librarians, scientists…

14 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Expert Systems Because many rules are based on probabilities computers can be programmed with “subject knowledge” to mimic the role of experts One of the most common uses of expert systems is in medicine The ONCOLOG system shown here analyses patient data to provide a reference for doctors, and help for the choice, prescription and follow-up of chemotherapy

15 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Summary InformationDataContextMeaning =++ Processing Data – raw facts and figures Information – data that has been processed (in a context) to give it meaning

16 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Revision Tasks Use the Teach-ICT mini site to make your own notes on the differences between data, knowledge and information Try questions 1-6 on this worksheet

17 FatMax Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 LicenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License Suggested answers to examples Example 1 We could add up the yes and no responses and calculate the percentage of customers who would buy product X at price Y. The information could be presented as a chart to make it easier to understand. Example 2 Adding Jayne’s scores would give us a mark out of 600 that could then be converted to an A level grade. Alternatively we could convert the individual module results into grades. Example 3 By subtracting the second value from the first we can work out how many units of gas the consumer has used. This can then be multiplied by the price per unit to determine the customer’s gas bill.


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