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Skid Steer Comparisons Mark Novak 2007 National AgrAbility Workshop.

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Presentation on theme: "Skid Steer Comparisons Mark Novak 2007 National AgrAbility Workshop."— Presentation transcript:

1 Skid Steer Comparisons Mark Novak 2007 National AgrAbility Workshop

2 Skid Steer Comparisons Today’s Presentation Today’s Presentation Classroom Classroom Some slides and discussion about skid steers Some slides and discussion about skid steers Outdoor –> hands on Outdoor –> hands on Complete skid steer comparison tool data gathering sheet Complete skid steer comparison tool data gathering sheet

3 Skid Steer Comparisons Classroom Classroom History History Definition/Uses Definition/Uses Safety Safety Features Features Manufacturers Manufacturers Web sites Web sites Marketing Marketing Attachments Attachments Discuss skid steer data gathering sheet Discuss skid steer data gathering sheet

4 Skid Steer Comparisons Outdoor Outdoor Have four skid steer models Have four skid steer models Break into groups Break into groups Take some measurements and fill out skid steer data gathering tool Take some measurements and fill out skid steer data gathering tool No driving No driving Turn data gathering tool results at end of session Turn data gathering tool results at end of session

5 Skid Steer Comparisons History History 1 st product was three-wheeled loader used to clean turkey barns in early 1950s 1 st product was three-wheeled loader used to clean turkey barns in early 1950s Original rights sold to E.G. Melrose Co. Original rights sold to E.G. Melrose Co. In 1958, the “Bobcat skid-steer” loader was introduced by the Melrose Co. In 1958, the “Bobcat skid-steer” loader was introduced by the Melrose Co. Change direction quickly Change direction quickly Turn within its own wheelbase Turn within its own wheelbase In 1995, Ingersol Rand bought Bobcat In 1995, Ingersol Rand bought Bobcat

6 Skid Steer Comparisons History History Today Bobcat Co. is a business unit of Ingersoll Rand Today Bobcat Co. is a business unit of Ingersoll Rand Many companies have developed their own skid steer loaders for agricultural and construction equipment use Many companies have developed their own skid steer loaders for agricultural and construction equipment use

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8 Skid Steer Comparisons Definition/Uses: Definition/Uses: Skid steer, skid loader, skid-steer loader, etc. is a rigid frame, engine-powered machine with lift arms used to attach a wide variety of labor-saving tools and attachments. Skid steer, skid loader, skid-steer loader, etc. is a rigid frame, engine-powered machine with lift arms used to attach a wide variety of labor-saving tools and attachments. The term “bobcat” is sometimes used as a generic term for skid-steer loaders. The term “bobcat” is sometimes used as a generic term for skid-steer loaders. Four-wheel drive vehicles, with the left drive wheels independent of the right drive wheels, so that wheel speed and rotation determine direction of the loader and allow the loader to turn within its own tracks Four-wheel drive vehicles, with the left drive wheels independent of the right drive wheels, so that wheel speed and rotation determine direction of the loader and allow the loader to turn within its own tracks

9 Skid Steer Comparisons Uses Uses The safe operation of skid steer loaders can address limitations including: The safe operation of skid steer loaders can address limitations including: Lifting Lifting Carrying Carrying Pushing Pushing Pulling Pulling Use of only one hand Use of only one hand Walking Walking Reaching and bending Reaching and bending

10 Skid Steer Comparisons Safety Safety Web is full of great resources on skid steer loader safety and safe operation Web is full of great resources on skid steer loader safety and safe operation

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13 Skid Steer Comparisons Safety Hazards (short list): Safety Hazards (short list): Loader or loaded front mounted buckets, roll over, tilt back and onto operator Loader or loaded front mounted buckets, roll over, tilt back and onto operator Lots of control levers in a tight space, easy to bump unintended Lots of control levers in a tight space, easy to bump unintended Lift arms close to operator’s area Lift arms close to operator’s area Pinch, shear and crush points close to the operator’s area Pinch, shear and crush points close to the operator’s area Entry and exit over the attachment and past operator’s controls Entry and exit over the attachment and past operator’s controls

14 Skid Steer Comparisons Safety Features Safety Features FOPS/ROPS (falling object protection, roll over protection) FOPS/ROPS (falling object protection, roll over protection) Safety belt and/or restraint bar Safety belt and/or restraint bar Lift arm lockouts or lift arm supports Lift arm lockouts or lift arm supports Seat interlocks Seat interlocks Back up sirens Back up sirens Read the operator instructions Read the operator instructions

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16 Skid Steer Comparisons Features Features Rigid frame Rigid frame Operation (left independent of right) Operation (left independent of right) Mostly diesel motors Mostly diesel motors FOPS/ROPS (all new designs) FOPS/ROPS (all new designs) Cab, some enclosed with heat, AC, etc. Cab, some enclosed with heat, AC, etc. One or two lift arms One or two lift arms Auxiliary hydraulics Auxiliary hydraulics

17 Skid Steer Comparisons Features Features Turn within their own wheel base Turn within their own wheel base Most have hydrostatic (variable) speed transmissions Most have hydrostatic (variable) speed transmissions Low center of gravity (by design) Low center of gravity (by design) Most offer hand/foot control, or dual hand only control for operation Most offer hand/foot control, or dual hand only control for operation Some also offer T-bar hand control and joystick controls Some also offer T-bar hand control and joystick controls

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19 Skid Steer Comparisons Features Features Wheels versus tracks Wheels versus tracks

20 Skid Steer Comparisons Manufacturers Manufacturers Some estimates say there are as many as 40 companies that “label or sell” skid steer loaders Some estimates say there are as many as 40 companies that “label or sell” skid steer loaders Some of the more common names of skid steer loader companies in the United States: Some of the more common names of skid steer loader companies in the United States: Bobcat John Deere Gehl JCB Mustang New Holland CaseIH

21 Skid Steer Comparisons Manufacturers Manufacturers Web sites Web sites

22 Skid Steer Comparisons Manufacturers Manufacturers Examples of Skid Steer Loaders marketing brochures Examples of Skid Steer Loaders marketing brochures

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25 Skid Steer Comparisons Attachments: Attachments: Skid steer attachment list is almost endless and continues to grow Skid steer attachment list is almost endless and continues to grow Most attachments have specific purpose (e.g., post hole digger, walk-way sweeper, etc.) Most attachments have specific purpose (e.g., post hole digger, walk-way sweeper, etc.) Newer skid steers include the hydraulic capability to operate these attachments, while older skid steers may not Newer skid steers include the hydraulic capability to operate these attachments, while older skid steers may not

26 Skid Steer Comparisons Attachments Attachments Some of the more popular (even standard) attachments are: Some of the more popular (even standard) attachments are: Bucket (different styles) Bucket (different styles) Forks (for pallet moving) Forks (for pallet moving) Blades (snow, dirt, etc.) Blades (snow, dirt, etc.) Brooms (snow, dirt, etc.) Brooms (snow, dirt, etc.) Jack hammer (for construction/demolition) Jack hammer (for construction/demolition)

27 Skid Steer Comparisons Attachments Attachments At At counted about 60 kinds of attachments, some of the less well know might be: Brush mowers Brush mowers Log splitters Log splitters Post pounders Post pounders Rock saw Rock saw Tree shears Tree shears

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29 Skid Steer Comparisons Why did we develop the skid steer comparison tool data gathering sheet Why did we develop the skid steer comparison tool data gathering sheet Look at skid steer features that maybe important to farmers and ranchers with a disability Look at skid steer features that maybe important to farmers and ranchers with a disability As we’ve seen, this information is not typically found in standard marketing brochure (i.e., number and placement of hand holds/hand rails, etc.) As we’ve seen, this information is not typically found in standard marketing brochure (i.e., number and placement of hand holds/hand rails, etc.)

30 Skid Steer Comparisons What does the Skid Steer Comparison Tool Data Gathering Sheet look like? What does the Skid Steer Comparison Tool Data Gathering Sheet look like? 7 pages long 7 pages long First 3 pages have 13 questions First 3 pages have 13 questions Last 4 pages have sample pictures to assist with data collection Last 4 pages have sample pictures to assist with data collection Requires tape measure, pencil/pen, and clipboard Requires tape measure, pencil/pen, and clipboard Suggest including a digital camera Suggest including a digital camera Requires about 15 minutes to complete Requires about 15 minutes to complete

31 Skid Steer Comparisons Other Features Important to AgAbility Other Features Important to AgAbility Are there places to safely step Are there places to safely step Are there multiple hand holds/hand rails Are there multiple hand holds/hand rails What are the operator’s opening (doorway or door width and height) minimum and maximum What are the operator’s opening (doorway or door width and height) minimum and maximum What kind of foot room is allowed What kind of foot room is allowed What kind of issues might arise accessing the common service areas (e.g., filling with fuel, checking oil levels, etc.) What kind of issues might arise accessing the common service areas (e.g., filling with fuel, checking oil levels, etc.)

32 Skid Steer Comparison Tool Data Gathering Sheet Skid steer manufacturers produce very detailed marketing brochures which you can review to compare one brand of skid steer against another. The marketing brochures include everything from basic machine measurements, turning radius, engine size, hydraulic flow, attachment capability, operating controls available (hand only, hand and foot, etc.) and whether the cab (ROPS/FOPS) is totally enclosed to allow it to be heated and cooled. Armed with this information, if a user is interested in purchasing or recommending a skid steer they will have most of the information necessary to make an informed decision. Skid steer manufacturers produce very detailed marketing brochures which you can review to compare one brand of skid steer against another. The marketing brochures include everything from basic machine measurements, turning radius, engine size, hydraulic flow, attachment capability, operating controls available (hand only, hand and foot, etc.) and whether the cab (ROPS/FOPS) is totally enclosed to allow it to be heated and cooled. Armed with this information, if a user is interested in purchasing or recommending a skid steer they will have most of the information necessary to make an informed decision. Almost all makes and models of skid steer require the operator to be able to climb into the skid steer from the front of the machine in order to operate it. Therefore, the few questions gathered below are notes about the availability of hand holds, steps, and some general measurements which may affect an individual’s ability to climb into and out of a skid steer, or do maintenance. Also, even with hand holds and steps, skid steers in general are not easy to access and may not be the proper machine for individuals with severe mobility limitations. (Please see the attached pictures for assistance with the questions and where/how to perform the measurements below.) Almost all makes and models of skid steer require the operator to be able to climb into the skid steer from the front of the machine in order to operate it. Therefore, the few questions gathered below are notes about the availability of hand holds, steps, and some general measurements which may affect an individual’s ability to climb into and out of a skid steer, or do maintenance. Also, even with hand holds and steps, skid steers in general are not easy to access and may not be the proper machine for individuals with severe mobility limitations. (Please see the attached pictures for assistance with the questions and where/how to perform the measurements below.) Skid Steer Data Entry: Skid Steer Data Entry: Skid Steer Manufacturer: ___________Model: ___________ Date: __________ Skid Steer Manufacturer: ___________Model: ___________ Date: __________ 1. Do you enter the skid steer from the front? ____ yes, ___ no 1. Do you enter the skid steer from the front? ____ yes, ___ no (if yes, go to question #3) (if yes, go to question #3) 2. Do you enter the skid steer from the side? ____ yes, ___ no 2. Do you enter the skid steer from the side? ____ yes, ___ no (if yes, go to question # 4) (if yes, go to question # 4) 3. If there is a bucket attached to the skid steer that you must step over to enter the skid steer, how high must you step (top of the bucket)? ___ inches 3. If there is a bucket attached to the skid steer that you must step over to enter the skid steer, how high must you step (top of the bucket)? ___ inches (Note: When recommending a skid steer, be sure you understand “all” the different types of attachments [not just a bucket] that a farmer/rancher might wish to use and thus you may have to step over to enter and exit the operator’s area. If one of these attachments makes entering or exiting the skid steer even more difficult when attached, this may help you decide to use a manual versus an automatic attachment mounting system. With an automatic mounting system, it should be easier to remove [and re-connect] any attachments, and without the attachments it may be easier for the farmer/rancher to enter/exit the operator’s area.) (Note: When recommending a skid steer, be sure you understand “all” the different types of attachments [not just a bucket] that a farmer/rancher might wish to use and thus you may have to step over to enter and exit the operator’s area. If one of these attachments makes entering or exiting the skid steer even more difficult when attached, this may help you decide to use a manual versus an automatic attachment mounting system. With an automatic mounting system, it should be easier to remove [and re-connect] any attachments, and without the attachments it may be easier for the farmer/rancher to enter/exit the operator’s area.)

33 5. Measure from the ground to here, the bottom of the doorway opening the operator must step across to enter the skid steer operator’s area. 4b. With or without the bucket attached, this would be an example of a second step or platform, on the side or front of the skid steer measured from the ground. 3. Measure from the ground to here, this is the first step if the bucket is attached. 4a. If the bucket was not attached, measure from the ground to here would be the first step.

34 9. Three sets of hand holds, one inside and two outside the ROPS/FOPS (located on both sides). 8. Doorway height. 7. Maximum doorway width. 6. Minimum doorway width is here, due to inside design of the door.

35 10. Notice the entrance and exit door latches, describe each.

36 11. Area to measure for operator’s feet. 11a. Width area for feet, front to back. 11b. Width area for feet, side to side.

37 Skid Steer Comparisons Pictures of things you may wish to look for if you are thinking about purchasing a skid steer loader… Pictures of things you may wish to look for if you are thinking about purchasing a skid steer loader…

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51 References A 100-Year March of Progress: AEM & ASABE. By James H. Ebbinghaus. Web sites:


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