Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Partnerships to Promote Health and Prevent Disease through Physical Activity Roseann M. Lyle, PhD Lakshmi Josyula Professor, Public Health PhD Candidate.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Partnerships to Promote Health and Prevent Disease through Physical Activity Roseann M. Lyle, PhD Lakshmi Josyula Professor, Public Health PhD Candidate."— Presentation transcript:

1 Partnerships to Promote Health and Prevent Disease through Physical Activity Roseann M. Lyle, PhD Lakshmi Josyula Professor, Public Health PhD Candidate Purdue University Health and Kinesiology Department

2 Outline National Blueprint/Coalition for Living Well after 50 Greater Lafayette Survey of Exercise Related Patterns Healthcare provider physical activity prescription intervention Future recommendations

3 RESEARCH WORK PLACE Barriers HOME/ COMMUNITY MEDICAL SYSTEMS MARKETING PUBLIC POLICY

4 Physical Inactivity Source: NIA, 2000 Fewer than 50% of older adults ever receive a suggestion to exercise from their physicians

5 Home and Community Strategies Provide funding and implement PA programs for older adults through existing community facilitiesProvide funding and implement PA programs for older adults through existing community facilities Establish partnerships among health, aging, urban/community planning, transportation, environmental groups, recreation, social service, and the private sector. Encourage these groups to work together to define, create, promote and sustain communities that support lifelong PAEstablish partnerships among health, aging, urban/community planning, transportation, environmental groups, recreation, social service, and the private sector. Encourage these groups to work together to define, create, promote and sustain communities that support lifelong PA

6 Health Departments Aging Organizations Physician Groups Researchers Activity Experts Parks & Recreation Transportation Hospital Systems City Government Faith Communities Service Organizations Community Centers Advocates Fitness Centers Neighborhood Associations Volunteers Policy Makers Employers Health Plans

7 Greater Lafayette Survey of Exercise-related Patterns & Needs of Older Adults Tippecanoe County Initial community needs assessment Indiana State Department of Health Hyner G, Lyle R, McKenzie S, Seehafer R, Sipe C & Hurley K.

8 Cardiovascular Exercise NO = 38.5% Yes = 61.5% Types Brisk walkingBrisk walking RunningRunning BikingBiking HikingHiking SwimmingSwimming RowingRowing MachinesMachines

9 Body Mass Index BMI Weight Status Below 18.5 Underweight 18.5 – 24.9 Normal 25.0 – 29.9 Overweight 30.0 and Above Obese BMI=24

10 Health Related Medical Advice 37% reported that in the last year their doctor had advised them to “exercise more” and “reduce fat in their diet”. Has your Dr. ever… Helped plan PA? NO = 84%Helped plan PA? NO = 84% Provided exercise info? NO = 82%Provided exercise info? NO = 82% Given you a referral for PA? NO = 88%Given you a referral for PA? NO = 88% Followed up on progress? NO = 86%Followed up on progress? NO = 86%

11 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY QUESTIONS 2005 In the last 12 months, did you talk with a doctor or other health provider about your level of exercise or physical activity? In the last 12 months, did a doctor or other health provider advise you to start, increase, or maintain your level of exercise or physical activity? For example, in order to improve your health, your doctor may advise you to start taking the stairs, increase walking from 10 to 20 minutes every day, or to maintain your current exercise program.

12 Activity Can Decrease Costs Activity Can Decrease Costs Medical Care Costs: $ 24,438,646 Workers Comp Costs: $ 476,208 Lost Productivity costs: $ 129,280,746 Total Costs: $ 154,195,600 If as little as 5% of inactive people in Tippecanoe County became physically active, it could save an estimated $7,709,780/year If as little as 5% of inactive people in Tippecanoe County became physically active, it could save an estimated $7,709,780/year Physical Inactivity Cost Calculator http://www.ecu.edu/picostcalc/

13 Harnessing the primary care setting… Healthcare provider physical activity prescription intervention –Design –Status Inferences Possibilities

14 Bulletin “ The USPSTF found insufficient evidence to determine whether counseling patients in primary care settings to promote physical activity leads to sustained increases in physical activity among adult patients.” “ The USPSTF found insufficient evidence to determine whether counseling patients in primary care settings to promote physical activity leads to sustained increases in physical activity among adult patients.” (http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/3rduspstf/physactivity/physactrr.pdf) (http://www.ahrq.gov/clinic/3rduspstf/physactivity/physactrr.pdf)

15 Influential initiatives “Americans in Motion” - American Academy of Family Physicians Encourage “fitness role models”. Utilize and enhance “family physicians’ unique ability to promote fitness within their communities”. “Exercise is Medicine” - American College of Sports Medicine “We're trying to get every physician to prescribe exercise at every visit.” President Robert E. Sallis, M.D., FACSM

16 RationaleRationale –Inadequately active population (CDC, 2006) –Credibility (and access) of healthcare providers (Active for Life® National Program Office, 2004; Sattler & Doniek, 1997; USDHHS, 2002; Jimmy & Martin, 2004) –Inadequate counseling regarding physical activity (Cohen, Davis, and Mikkelsen, 2004) ObjectiveObjective –Examine the impact of healthcare providers’ recommendations of physical activity on patients’ physical activity levels Healthcare provider physical activity prescription intervention

17 Participants, methods and materials –Adult patients on preventive care visits Proposed N = 450Proposed N = 450 –Assessments Self-report (questionnaires) and fitness testingSelf-report (questionnaires) and fitness testing –Timeline: 6 months6 months –Interventions PrescriptionPrescription Prescription + Thera- Band® Exercise ToolkitPrescription + Thera- Band® Exercise Toolkit Prescription + Active Living GuidePrescription + Active Living Guide

18 Barriers For providersFor providers –Lack of reimbursement and time (Ainsworth & Youmans, 2002; Manson et al, 2004) –Inadequate knowledge of physical activity recommendations and resources ( (Walsh, Swangard, Davis, and Mc Phee, 1999) –Lack of confidence in impact on patients (Guo, Gottlieb, Smith, Huang, and Huang, 2002) For administrative personnelFor administrative personnel –More work –No compensation

19 Barriers For researchersFor researchers –Constrained access to participants Mailing through officesMailing through offices Time lagTime lag –Limited funds Reliance on volunteersReliance on volunteers (Weak) incentive of lucky draw(Weak) incentive of lucky draw For patients For patients “Junk mail” “Junk mail” Low priority –slips through Low priority –slips through “No pay – no play” “No pay – no play” Reluctance to take on Reluctance to take on “ any more” “ any more” (Un)healthy fear of “exercise”, even “physical activity” (Un)healthy fear of “exercise”, even “physical activity”

20 –Reimbursement to providers –Education and provision of resources to providers –Improved access to participant populations for researchers –Funding for research and participant-compensation Solutions?

21 Future Possibilities Health Communication –Best messages Economics –Incentive approach Health and Kinesiology –Exercise programs Biomedical Engineering –Monitoring devices Institutional Review Board –Most efficient design Insurance –Reimbursement to providers –Incentives for clients Community Exercise Facilities –Discounts

22 THANK YOU Roseann M. Lyle, PhD Lakshmi Josyula Professor, Public Health PhD Candidate Purdue University Health and Kinesiology Department


Download ppt "Partnerships to Promote Health and Prevent Disease through Physical Activity Roseann M. Lyle, PhD Lakshmi Josyula Professor, Public Health PhD Candidate."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google