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Part 3: A Blueprint for Thoughtful Questioning The goal for this session is to move our work on four-style questioning deeper by examining the criteria.

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Presentation on theme: "Part 3: A Blueprint for Thoughtful Questioning The goal for this session is to move our work on four-style questioning deeper by examining the criteria."— Presentation transcript:

1 Part 3: A Blueprint for Thoughtful Questioning The goal for this session is to move our work on four-style questioning deeper by examining the criteria for thoughtful questions and applying our learning to the development of extended lessons and units. Copyright © 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

2 In this session you will:  Learn what makes a question thoughtful.  Explore the “blueprint” for designing lessons and units that place thoughtful questions at the center of learning.  Examine and discuss a set of blueprints designed by teachers at various grade levels and content areas.  Design your own lesson or unit using the blueprint model. Copyright © 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

3 What was the purpose of the activity? How well did the questioning tool help to achieve that purpose? Did the teacher explain/model the process? How did students respond? How well were the four styles of questions represented? How would you characterize students’ level of engagement during the activity? What signs of deep comprehension did you observe? Now that you have tried a questioning tool out for yourself and have observed one of your peers using a questioning tool, it’s time to share what you’ve learned. Copyright © 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

4 Share your own thoughts on your activity What goals did you set out to achieve? What steps did you take? What was hard for you? What came naturally? What worked about the activity and what just wouldn’t work? What three tips would you give yourself to make your activity work better next time? Copyright © 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

5 What Makes a Question Thoughtful? Have a clear instructional purpose Focus on critical content Address various learning situations Invite diverse styles of thinking Clearly identify the product or kind of response students will develop Often need to be set up Copyright © 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

6 Classroom Excerpt 1 Purpose Content Situation Style(s) Product Setup To have students generate ideas for settling disputes Arguments and settling disputes Discussions Interpersonal Understanding List of techniques for dissolving arguments Story of two friends Uses prior knowledge of own arguments Copyright © 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

7 Classroom Excerpt 2 Purpose Content Situation Style(s) Product Setup To have students use fractions related to real world situations Fractions and real-world application Homework Mastery Understanding Explanation in journal Fractional analysis of grocery list Use of family grocery list and cost to use fractions Copyright © 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

8 Classroom Excerpt 3 Purpose Content Situation Style(s) Product Setup To have students write a short essay to show their understanding negative or positive feedback Negative or positive feedback Essay Diagram Interpersonal Understanding Self-Expressive Diagram Essay Giving an example of negative or positive feedback Copyright © 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

9 Classroom Excerpt 4 Purpose Content Situation Style(s) Product Setup To have students show their understanding of Civil War through an interview skill Civil War Interview skills Discussion Note cards Interpersonal Understanding Self-Expressive Interview Hypothetical situation Copyright © 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

10 Questions: The Stuff That Great Lessons and Units Are Made of How is a lesson or unit like a home? Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

11 “Blueprint” for designing Lessons and Units Foyer Where we activate students’ prior knowledge and arouse student interest (Knowledge Anticipation) Library Where we provide information and ideas through lecture, readings, or viewings (Knowledge Acquisition) Kitchen Where students cook up a product that demonstrates what they know (Knowledge Application) Workshop Where students rehearse and practice what they are learning (Practicing and Processing New Knowledge) Porch Where students lean back, reflect, generalize, and question what they have learned (Reflection) Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

12 The Model Lesson: Inference at Bat Goal 1.2: Students make sense of the variety of materials they read. Core Content Standards RD-E02.0.7: Identify the organizational pattern in a text. RD-E02.0.8: Identify main ideas and details that support them. RD-E02.0.9: Make predictions and draw conclusions based on what is read. RD-E : Connect the content of a passage to students’ lives and/or real- world issues. Goal 1.11: Students write using appropriate forms, conventions, and styles to communicate ideas and information to different audiences for different purposes. Core Content Standards WR-E-1.3: Literary writing artfully communicates with the reader about the human condition. Literary forms in the portfolio include poems, short stories, and scripts. Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

13 What do I want students to know (facts, details, summaries)? What attitudes or habits of mind do I want my students to develop? What do I want students to understand (big ideas, concepts, and generalizations)? What skills do I want students to develop? The Model Lesson: Inference at Bat  What happens in the poem  How the poem “works” (rhyme scheme, form, etc.)  That authors use clues to express unstated ideas (inference)  That personal attitudes and performance are related Making inferences and supporting them with evidence Writing narrative poetry Appreciation for narrative poetry Learning how to adjust their own attitude to improve personal performance Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

14 Foyer How might attitudes affect your performance? What signs or clues might reveal your attitudes? Library As you listen to the poem, close your eyes and try to imagine what is happening. Then, as you read it, ask yourself: What clues point to Casey’s attitude? Kitchen What would Casey say in his post-game interview? Write a final stanza to the poem that provides clues to Casey’s attitude. Workshop Can you retell the poem in seven sentences? Is Casey’s attitude responsible for his failure? Collect evidence that supports or refutes. Porch What’s an attitude you have that you’d like to change? What clues might show that your attitude is improving? The Model Lesson: Inference at Bat Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

15 Bill’s Blueprint for “Casey at the Bat” Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

16 Blueprint for Native Americans and pilgrims Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

17 Blueprint for long division Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

18 Blueprint for Vietnam War: The War Powers Act and The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

19 Foyer …activate prior knowledge and arouse interest? Library …help students attend to key information? Kitchen …help students apply their learning? Workshop …help students rehearse and extend learning? Porch …help students reflect on learning? ThoughtWork: Before the Next Session What questions did the teacher ask to… Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press

20 ThoughtWork: Before the Next Session Collecting Artifacts for Part Four Remember to continue collecting your artifacts that will demonstrate progress toward your two goals. Artifacts might include: Classroom observation (your own or a fellow teacher’s observations) Pre- and post-test scores Sample student work Assignments or lesson plans Student surveys or questionnaires (capturing students’ reactions and reflections) Video or audio clips from your classroom Entries from your personal reflection journal A case study of a particular student or group of students Copyright 2007 Thoughtful Education Press


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