Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Equipping Your English Learners for Academic Success Building Receptive and Expressive Language.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Equipping Your English Learners for Academic Success Building Receptive and Expressive Language."— Presentation transcript:

1 Equipping Your English Learners for Academic Success Building Receptive and Expressive Language

2 22 Norms  Be respectful of one another Cell phones off or on vibrate Avoid side conversations (jot notes instead?) Ask “we” questions. Save “me” questions.  Keep the focus on teaching and learning; that which is within our sphere of influence  Be a learner - actively participate in readings, discussions and activities

3 33 Participation Processes  Parking Lot questions will be addressed after breaks and at the end of day  During discussion time, please focus attention on the given task first, then discuss related topics of interest.  At the signal, please finish your sentence but refrain from starting a new paragraph

4 4 Thinking About My English Learners…  My Turn, Your Turn Letter off A-B-A-B at your table. Remember your letter.  Person A turns the first frame into a question.  Person B completes the frame.  Frames are on the following slide Use previous learning from the E.L. Series and your experience as reference points. Continue with the same process, switching roles for each bullet.

5 5 Reflections… 1. To best support English Learners based on their background and level of English use, we need to know _______ and ________. (Day 1 & 2) 2. A few strategies to scaffold content learning for English learners include_______, _______, and ______. (Day 2) 3. I have had the most success with my English learners when ____________. 4. A challenge I have had in supporting my English learners with their language growth includes ______.

6 66 Outcomes for the Day Answer the Questions:  How do I maximize English Language learning in both ELD and content standard instruction?  What language structures need to be taught and how do I teach them?

7 Looking At Our English Learners

8 Research Driven Questions Teachers Should Ask Last time we asked:  What will I do to establish and communicate learning goals, and celebrate success?  What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge? This time we will focus on the question:  What will I do to engage my English Learners? The Art and Science of Teaching Marzano, 2007

9 Language Learning Need to be explicit with our language instruction so that we can help prevent…

10

11 11 Instructional Blueprint for English Learners  This blueprint describes two instructional purposes: 1. Systematic ELD (for proficiency level) 2. English language for content learning (for grade level)  Please read the Blueprint for English Learner Instruction.  As you read, highlight key phrases for table sharing to follow. E.L. Achieve: A Focused Approach

12 Instructional Blueprint for English Learners Comprehensible delivery of content instruction: Utilizes instructional strategies and techniques to make content comprehensible (e.g. SIOP, GLAD, SDAIE, etc.) Maximizes teachable moments throughout the entire instructional day for both content and language E.L. Achieve: A Focused Approach

13 Instructional Blueprint for English Learners Comprehensible delivery of content instruction: Utilizes instructional strategies and techniques to make content comprehensible (e.g. SIOP, GLAD, SDAIE, etc.) Maximizes teachable moments throughout the entire instructional day for both content and language E.L. Achieve: A Focused Approach

14 Instructional Blueprint for English Learners Comprehensible delivery of content instruction: Utilizes instructional strategies and techniques to make content comprehensible (e.g. SIOP, GLAD, SDAIE, etc.) Maximizes teachable moments throughout the entire instructional day for both content and language E.L. Achieve: A Focused Approach

15 15 Talking Stick Instructional Blueprint: Talking Stick Consider the reading you just completed and the information that followed. In groups of 3 or 4, select a Talking Stick. 1st round – The Instructional Blueprint made me think about ____. 2nd round –I’m noticing that when it comes to learning a language, students _____because___. Continue using the frames above until the signal.

16 Language to Develop a Solid Language Foundation

17 17 When focusing on ELD… we have the opportunity to teach English learners the language they …  did not learn before entering school,  will not be taught in any other content area, and  need to be able to use every day. E.L. Achieve: A Focused Approach

18

19 ELD Matrix of Grammatical Forms Scope and sequence of grammatical knowledge across proficiency levels E.L. Achieve: A Focused Approach

20 20 Scope & Sequence of Language Skills ELD Matrix of Grammatical Forms  Describing actions & states of being: VERBS  Naming people, places & things: NOUNS & ARTICLES  Re-naming people, places & things: PRONOUNS  Connecting ideas: PREPOSITIONS  Connecting ideas: CONJUNCTIONS  Describing what kind, how many, how much, which one: ADJECTIVES  Describing when, where, how, why: ADVERBS

21 21 ELD Matrix of Grammatical Forms Layout of Tool:  Note proficiency levels across the top.  Note parts of speech along the left side. Getting to know this tool:  Skim entire ELD Matrix.  Read one level “vertically”.  Read one part of speech “horizontally”.

22 Enjoy a 10 minute break

23 23 Small Group Activity ELD Matrix Sort  You will work in groups of 3 or 4  Sort the cards by level of English proficiency using the ELD Matrix of Grammatical Forms as a resource  Now, group the samples by part of speech  Finally, generate one more example for each of the levels.

24 24 What’s Grammar Got to Do With It?  Internalized knowledge of grammatical forms Is essential to language proficiency Equips us with tools to communicate our thinking

25 25 Putting Grammar in its Place However, just as the ability to: Decode ≠ Reading, Grammatical knowledge ≠ Language. It greases the wheels for us to be able to communicate ideas. Functions First! But remember… Functions First! E.L. Achieve: A Focused Approach

26 26 Language Functions Functions are the purposes for communicating orally and in writing.

27 27 Language Functions Different language functions require different grammatical forms:  Retelling calls for verbs and verb phrases  Describing where something is located calls for prepositional phrases  Telling about a person or thing calls for nouns and pronouns

28 ELD: Prominent Language Functions Interpersonal Communication Express needs and make requests Contribute ideas and opinions to a discussion Negotiate solutions Express Action & Time Relationships Discuss or create a plan Retell actions and events Ask for, give and follow multi- step directions Describe, Compare, Contrast Describe physical characteristics Describe location of objects in space Express Cause & Effect, Predict, Infer Cause and effect for actions Make predictions and inferences about actions and events

29 Language to Share Content Knowledge Receptive which leads to Expressive

30 Content Learning: Dominant Language Functions  Language functions commonly found in content standards, include: Identification and explanation (includes description, definition) Cause and effect relationships Compare and contrast attributes or actions Prediction and inference Express sequence and time relationships Summary and generalization

31 Cause and Effect: Signal Words Topic: Charges What causes a negatively charged balloon to stick to a neutral wall? This happens because there is another way to separate charges. The balloon’s negative charges repel negative charges in the wall. The wall’s negative charges move away a little. They are now separated from the wall’s positive charges. The balloon’s negative charges are then attracted to the wall’s positive charges. The balloon sticks to the wall. Harcourt School Publisher: California Science; grade 4 Interactive Science Reader

32 Cause and Effect: Signal Words & Phrases Topic: Charges What causes a negatively charged balloon to stick to a neutral wall? This happens because there is another way to separate charges. The balloon’s negative charges repel negative charges in the wall. The wall’s negative charges move away a little. They are now separated from the wall’s positive charges. The balloon’s negative charges are then attracted to the wall’s positive charges. The balloon sticks to the wall. Harcourt School Publisher: California Science; grade 4 Interactive Science Reader

33 Vocabulary to teach  The topic determines the vocabulary you need to teach. Topic: Charges What causes a negatively charged balloon to stick to a neutral wall? This happens because there is another way to separate charges. The balloon’s negative charges repel negative charges in the wall. The wall’s negative charges move away a little. They are now separated from the wall’s positive charges. The balloon’s negative charges are then attracted to the wall’s positive charges. The balloon sticks to the wall.

34 Your Turn…  Peruse the Dominant Function Content paragraphs and choose several to look for signal words based on a function with a partner. Circle the signal words  What might be some important vocabulary to teach? Underline the vocabulary  If you brought your materials, look at upcoming passages to identify the language function, signal words and important vocabulary to teach. If not, use the CST Release Test Questions.

35 Connection : Language Function Signal Words B/EI – is going to, will, I think I – think, believe, probably, predict, might EA/A – most likely, certainly, doubt, based on, Predict/HypothesizeSequence B/EI – first, second, next, then, last, I – To get started, from there, continue to, to finish EA/A – initially, eventually, to begin/conclude the process, Explain through classification B/EI – have, are, are called, is used to I – described as, is part of, is related to, is used for EA/A – characterized by, utilized for, identified by, employed as, features,

36 Signal Words are not enough…  Students need sentence frames to provide structure for responses that focus on accuracy. To get started, we ____. After that, we ____. From there, we _____. Finally, ____. When ____ is added to _____, it ______. _____ is _______, however, _____ is ______. Both _____ and _____ are able to ______.  Your turn…  Use the Thumbnail Look at Common Functions to create a few frames for expressive language students will need to use in an upcoming situation.

37 Starters vs. Frames Sentence Starters and Sentences Frames are not the same…

38 Sentence Starters do not provide sufficient structure for accurate responses  Prompt How does your best friend get to school?  Sentence Starter My best friend __________________.  Sentence Frame My best friend ______s to school Verb Bank: (present tense +s) walks rides her bike gets a ride

39 Simple Sentence Starters can be turned into Sentence Frames  Sentence Starters require students to already know how to accurately complete the sentence  Sentence Frames add essential grammatical support so students can produce a competent response in the appropriate register.

40 Response Frames Language Function: Prediction  I predict that the character _______ will ________ (base verb: study, leave) or will be ______ (adjective: upset, excited)  I made this prediction because she/he ________ (past tense verb: tried, bought) Source of example: Kate Kinsella

41 Enjoy an hour for lunch

42 Structured Oral Language Practice Student Participation and Practice

43 Structured Oral Language Practice  Provides students the opportunity to: Internalize new vocabulary and sentence structures Develop fluent accuracy Build confidence in using English  Provides teachers ongoing monitoring of student progress.  Provides students the opportunity to: Internalize new vocabulary and sentence structures Develop fluent accuracy Build confidence in using English  Provides teachers ongoing monitoring of student progress.

44 Find Someone Who Language Practice Strategies  With a partner other than that at your table, meet to: Have your partner describe ONE of the strategies. You jot down the gist of the strategy in the box. Finish by writing down your partners name. Continue the process with new partners until you hear the chime.

45 Head to the Computer Lab

46 Pulling it all together  With a partner, consider today’s focus on building receptive and expressive language. In what ways will you support the learning of English in upcoming lessons? Be prepared to share your thoughts.

47 Day 3 Evaluation Reflect on Day 3 Learning (http://estaffroom.sccoe.org)http://estaffroom.sccoe.org Thank you for spending the day with us!


Download ppt "Equipping Your English Learners for Academic Success Building Receptive and Expressive Language."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google